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Best backup methodology?


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#1 DnDer

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 03:06 PM

I've seen a lot of topics about data recovery lately... So it got me thinking.

Do you just back up your documents and files? Do you create restore points to go back to? External hard drives? Maybe a mirrored RAID for your home tower? Off-site backup (ala mozy, carbonite)? How about periodically cloning your drive to a second HD (instead of constantly running two in a mirror)?

How do you back up? And what's usually the most effective way to prevent/recover from catastrophic failure?

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#2 Swordie

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 03:23 PM

Most people back up on External Hard Drives or Flash Drives, and or DVD's. If you use your computer on a standard use, there isn't really a way to prevent failure, neither is there really a way to recover from a failure without buying a new hard drive.

I personally don't back up my information on a External Hard Drive simply because I don't have the funding for it, but if I was suddenly awarded 100 dollars, I'd go invest in a 1TB External Hard Drive. Flash Drives just don't hold enough to back up EVERYTHING unless you have quite a few of them.
Who said I couldn't have everything?

#3 RTCTech1

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 04:01 PM

I agree with the external Hard Drive bit, easy to use, gets the job done.

You mentioned companies like Carbonite. What they do in general is good, allows you to choose what you back up, access it from anywhere, and make changes. MOST of these companies will store multiple copies in the event of a disaster (Carbonite DOES NOT... yet). Look into someone like GeekSquad or Norton, they have options that are affordable and worth the effort.

There are also software alternatives. Acronis is a wonderful program that allows you to back up individual files as well as make mirror images of your OS.

And, to add to the external hard drive portion, some hard drives like Maxtor come with data back up software and a little button on the front allowing you to back up in just a touch (Hence Maxtor's "One touch Backup").

Hope this helps!

#4 DnDer

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 04:10 PM

I'm just collecting data.

I back up my documents and things to a hard-working little maxtor. I have also cloned my hard drive on a second hd inside my tower (after my workstation at work had a hardware failure that even knoppix couldn't mount for data recovery, and cloning was the only thing that saved my hard drive there), but I've been thinking of setting up a raid, since I've seen how awesome it's been at work when we've had a failed drive (seriously! just pull it out and drop one in while the machine is running and keep working - how awesome is that?!) on the server.

#5 Swordie

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 04:17 PM

Honestly, I don't like those applications that "back up" your information. If your backing up a large amount of information, they take forever. I would just stick to the External Hard Drive, moderate expense, ease of use, and simplistic.
Who said I couldn't have everything?

#6 hamluis

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 04:19 PM

I currently backup my system partition/drive, using one of the precursors of today's Ghost.

But...next month (when I plan to use Windows 7 more), I will just clone the system partition to another hard drive. I have an excess number of hard drives from previous installs and pre-SATA. They work just fine for storage.

I'm kind of against external hard drives...I don't like putting all eggs in a big basket that probably has introduced another tentative point of failure into the system backup equation.

<<And what's usually the most effective way to prevent/recover from catastrophic failure?>>

Well...what's the easiest way to recover from a flat tire as one is driving through West Texas at 11 p.m.?

Answer: Have a spare that works. The methods for doing such are variable...but that is the intended result of each.

Louis

#7 Swordie

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 04:21 PM

True, External Hard Drives are likely to fail themselves one day.. This is why I really want to wait until SSD's are dramatically cheaper, and those are really the thing. They don't fail for a good 100K Cycles.. Which is quite alot of cycles as long as you don't read and write off them and just use them as storage.. Sadly, SSD's are only at 256 GB, so we're going to have to wait.
Who said I couldn't have everything?

#8 hamluis

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 08:15 AM

Well...there's nothing that says that today's hard drives...cannot be removed from the system when they are used literally as nothing but file cabinets.

In fact...as hard drives get faster, that's probably (IMO) the best function for older/PATA hard drives.

I use my smaller PATA drives as system partitions/drives...but I use my SATA hard drives for continuous computer usage...while using my larger PATA hard drives (up to 500GB) for nothing but storage of backups/archives.

Louis

#9 Swordie

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 09:09 PM

External Hard Drives can be said as having a extra folder full of stuff, but you can easily lose the folder aswell..

I might just get a 500 GB PATA and load them onto it.. Or I could buy lots of DVD's..
Who said I couldn't have everything?




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