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Computer shuts down after 10 seconds


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#1 sizzlefrizzle

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 07:26 PM

Hi, my computer turns off after about 10 seconds after pressing the power button.
If i try to power up again ( after it turns off)i get nothing, so i have to turn off the switch in the back and wait a few seconds.
After waiting it does turn on for 10 seconds and shuts down again.
I'm thinking power supply ?
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Hope I'm in the right place.
Joe

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#2 Jove

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 10:44 PM

Not sure this will help, but it may be useful, . .

The power button light located on the front of the computer illuminates and blinks or remains solid to indicate different states:

If the power light is green and the computer is not responding, see "Diagnostic Lights."


If the power light is blinking green, the computer is in standby mode. Press a key on the keyboard, move the mouse, or press the power button to resume normal operation.


If the power light is off, the computer is either turned off or is not receiving power.


Reseat the power cable into both the power connector on the back of the computer and the electrical outlet.


If the computer is plugged into a power strip, ensure that the power strip is plugged into an electrical outlet and that the power strip is turned on. Also bypass power protection devices, power strips, and power extension cables to verify that the computer turns on properly.


Ensure that the electrical outlet is working by testing it with another device, such as a lamp.


Ensure that the main power cable and front panel cable are securely connected to the system board.


If the power light is blinking amber, the computer is receiving electrical power, but an internal power problem might exist.


Ensure that the voltage selection switch is set to match the AC power at your location (if applicable).


If the power light is steady amber, a device might be malfunctioning or incorrectly installed.


Remove and then reinstall the memory modules.


Remove and then reinstall any cards.


Remove and then reinstall the graphics card, if applicable.


Ensure that the processor power cable is securely connected to the system board.


Eliminate interference. Some possible causes of interference are:


Power, keyboard, and mouse extension cables


Too many devices on a power strip


Multiple power strips connected to the same electrical outlet

When you don't have to worry about your computer anymore, you can start
living again !

vrwqzc.gif
Success is a result, not a goal. . . . Flaubert


#3 sizzlefrizzle

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 06:12 AM

I've checked all connections, everything seems fine.
I moved the computer to different outlets and nothing has changed.
The computer is a p4 that"s about 5 years old.
The light stays red.
I removed the hard drive and and scanned it for viruses on another computer,
one Trojan was found and Quarantined.
At first it would stay on longer but not long enough to use f8 or delete to get to bios settings.
Now it's not even getting to the reading of the drives.
Is there a way to check the power supply with a volt meter?
I will try reinstalling the cards and let you know.

Edited by sizzlefrizzle, 09 September 2009 - 06:16 AM.


#4 sizzlefrizzle

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 08:25 AM

Ok i have it running not sure what it was.
I can get to the bios menu what should i look for or change.
It won't go into Windows and f8 isn't working to get to safe mode.
Any suggestions??

#5 Jove

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 09:41 AM

Best I can tell you at this point is to go through the check list I posted, then, check in your pc manual for the method of getting into the safe mode, the bios is something you should be real sure of before you change anything, there is always the chance you may change a setting and lock yourself out or not know what you have changed.

But if you think that's it, than wait or google for advice.

Have you checked for clogged fans and so on, take a temperature check !

Good Luck !

P.S.
I read your previous answer, seems like you are on to it, possibly use another V-Scanner or two ! Could have been the card, might have been the V ?
Hard to tell when you have done multiple things, to correct without checking, each.

Edited by Jove, 09 September 2009 - 09:45 AM.

When you don't have to worry about your computer anymore, you can start
living again !

vrwqzc.gif
Success is a result, not a goal. . . . Flaubert


#6 Jove

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 09:48 AM

Check Radio Shack they have one or two inexpensive devices that may check the power.

Not positive but there is a Dr. Power, I have used it to check power but can not recall which I checked, I think it checks multiple sources.

When you don't have to worry about your computer anymore, you can start
living again !

vrwqzc.gif
Success is a result, not a goal. . . . Flaubert


#7 sizzlefrizzle

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 09:49 AM

Now windows just won't boot, i get these last five lines....
verifying dmi data pool
boot from cd
boot from cd
disk boot failure...please insert boot disk and press enter
Don't have a boot disk of course so not sure what to do
I'm going to do more searching. :thumbsup:

#8 ThunderZ

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 10:18 AM

Do you have a CD or DVD in an optical drive?

Did the hard drive show up in the BIOS?

When you replaced the hard drive did you make sure to hook up both cables?

If not then the message may be a sign of hard drive failure.

Edited by ThunderZ, 09 September 2009 - 10:21 AM.


#9 sizzlefrizzle

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 10:22 AM

Do you have a CD or DVD in an optical drive? no

Did the hard drive show up in the BIOS? yes

When you replaced the hard drive did you make sure to hook up both cables? yes

If not then the message may be a sign of hard drive failure.

The hard drive worked on the other computer so i don't think so.
Joe

Edited by sizzlefrizzle, 09 September 2009 - 10:24 AM.


#10 Jove

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 10:41 AM

I believe I have seen the Hard drive begin to fail and it may take a course where it works then it doesn't, . .



Try the safe mode for that HD on the other PC, . . . ?

When you don't have to worry about your computer anymore, you can start
living again !

vrwqzc.gif
Success is a result, not a goal. . . . Flaubert


#11 sizzlefrizzle

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 10:44 AM

Well i just found the problem by reading a post on another forum.
I'm posting this because someone else might have the same problem
First the computer shutting off after 10 seconds i believe was from some dirty power i was
getting from my outlets in my basement (not 100% sure)
Second when i took out my hard drive to connect to another computer i changed the pin.
When i put it back in my computer i put the pin on master which in this post below is a problem

.....The only time I've seen that error is when i was using a WesterDigital HD and i had the jumper settings on it set to Master with no other Hard Drive on my system. Even though this is correct (or good enough) on most all other HDs, Western Digital has caused problems for me set up this way. If i you only have one hard drive and it's a Western Digital, you do not need a Hard Drive jumper. If you have two hard drives, then you will need to set the jumper(s) appropriately. This comment comes from my experience with 4 Western Digital Hard drives ranging from 80Gb and up.



Thanks to everyone who responded to my post.
Joe :thumbsup:

#12 ThunderZ

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 10:47 AM

When the PC says "disk boot failure...please insert boot disk and press enter" it means it can not find the hard drive. This is either a mechanical failure or corrupt MBR.

Testing PS with VOM

Just saw your fix.
Strange it boot`d at all with improper jumper settings.

Edited by ThunderZ, 09 September 2009 - 10:48 AM.





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