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Partitioning during install


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#1 Wibbit

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 03:06 PM

Hello,

I'm at the start of a clean install of Windows XP on new hard disk.

The Setup instructions took me to partitioning of the drive. It's a 240Gb so I've gone for a partition of 120Gb. This is where I'll install XP.

But will the rest of the drive space, the unpartitioned space, be usable once XP has loaded? Do I have to create a second partition that is the size of the remaining space? Or can I do all this later through XP, and not suffer any consequence?

Anyone know?

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 03:17 PM

I suggest that you create a much smaller partition for XP, critical updates, and programs...no larger than 30GB at the most (I use 20GB).

There is no advantage whatever of having Windows installed on an extremely large partition...and there are distinct disadvantages when it comes to partition/system maintenance.

Once XP is installed, you can create additional partitions out of any remaining disk space...using either Disk Management or 3d-party drive/partition management tools, such as Easeus Partition Master - http://www.partition-tool.com/easeus-parti...g-partition.htm .

Louis

#3 Wibbit

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 03:28 PM

Thanks for the reply.

So unpartitioned space can be saved to and read from by XP.

I wanted a bigger Windows space as my last drive had 30Gb and I'd filled nearly 20Gb. I need loads of programs, and My docs, My pics, etc quickly fill up. I want the other half of the disk to use for audio. Are you saying that a choice of 120 will negatively affect the computer?

#4 Wibbit

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 04:08 PM

I've been doing some checking and Cubase and Photoshop both recommend that they're installed in Windows' Program folder. With all the VSTs and plugins, those two alone can amount to a few gig.

So I'm working on the logic that if I keep adding memory intensive software I'm going to need a big primary partition or else I'll run out of room. Or am I barking up the wrong tree?

But now you've got me worried.

Can some folk post how big their primary partitions are?

#5 Andrew

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 04:24 PM

<--Primary Partition = 20GB :thumbsup:

#6 hamluis

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 04:41 PM

Cubase and Photoshop...themselves aren't that large.

It's the files they work with that can be large and those are data files (graphics images), which have no business at all on anyone's C: partition.

"Memory-intensive" has nothing to do, literally, with hard drive space. Unlesss one infers that the program is memory-intensive because the data files which it works with...are so large or can be so large.

If you go back and review the suggestions for using Photoshop and most other memory-intensive graphics/video editors...you'll find that they suggest 2 things: a separate large hard drive solely for data files to be used (a scratch pad/drive) and as much memory as can be afforded/supported.

<<So unpartitioned space can be saved to and read from by XP.>>

Is that what I said?

Louis

#7 Wibbit

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 08:22 PM

Thanks for the replies to both.



Hamluis: <<Is that what I said?>>

It's what I originally asked! It's what this thread is about.

I understand you to have said that once XP is is loaded, I can access this unpartitioned part of the drive (even though I may have to format it first). I don't have to make the remaining unpartitioned space into one partition during install.

I don't know much about computers, obviously. If I'm not understanding properly please explain.

I went for a 50Gb primary partition in the end.

#8 hamluis

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 09:11 PM

Formatting is important...it's what allows Windows to use the space on a hard drive.

Unformatted space on a hard drive is like having money in a foreign bank when you live in the U.S...it's nice to know that you have it, but it's of no immediate value/use in your daily life...until you move it to this country and convert it into the currency that governs here.

If you look at the link I provided and read up on Disk Management, you would understand formatting and partitions better.

Disk Management - http://www.theeldergeek.com/disk_management.htm

Louis

#9 Wibbit

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 12:45 PM

Thanks for the links -- I've learned a lot. And as with any effective learning, I'm a step further but I now have more questions than when I started.

Formatting happens when I partition. I did have to turn the 'unpartitioned' space into partitions. I chose two primary partitions. As far as I can tell there's no technical reason why I shouldn't have partitioned the whole drive during install, instead of doing the other partitions later. I'm not aware of any technical reasons why doing it later is bad either. So, for anyone reading this who is stuck as I was, it seems it just doesn't matter.

How a hard drive is set up is clearly a contentious thing. I'll be doing a lot more research on this.

Thanks to all who posted.




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