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Antivirus Pro 2010 (I think)


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#1 hpNYC

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Posted 06 September 2009 - 12:14 PM

Greetings. I've been having trouble with variants of this virus for the last few months. I usually am able to get rid of the problem, but it seems to keep coming back. Also each time it comes back, it is a little nastier and more difficult to treat. This time, I turn to you for help as I am completely at a loss.

The symptoms:
1. Can't run or rename malwarebytes
2. Can only get on internet explorer if I load within 2 seconds of system startup
3. Various other programs won't run at all
4. Task manager won't run
5. I downloaded a process killer, but sometimes when I delete svhost.exe it forces a reboot of my computer.
6. I'm not sure which processes to kill (they are not named something obvious like "windows antivirus 2010.exe"
7. I can't seem to run in safe mode with networking. Everytime I try I get a blue screen that forces a reboot

Any help would be so appreciated. Feel free to private message me at Removed

thanks,

Jeff

Edited by The weatherman, 06 September 2009 - 01:27 PM.
Removed email address to protect the member from spambots~Tw


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#2 hpNYC

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 12:05 PM

Hey there. Thanks for providing help on these forums. Looks like it's been busy of late, but I'd appreciate your thoughts on the following questions:

1) If one has a particularly malicious version of antivirus pro (e.g. can't run programs, can't run regedit, can't run in safe mode) is there a good chance they have a rootkit and will need to reformat?

2) If I were to buy a new computer, would I be able to transfer data/pictures from my infected PC to an external HD (e.g. mybook) and not worry about infecting my new pc/mac?

3) How different/unique are the strains of this virus? Seems to me like everyone has some variant and I'm surprised there's not a sticky at the top that addresses some of the common ones.

4) Is this virus becoming more malicious over time? Seems like I've had other versions that were milder in the past (i.e. i could run a simple program like mbam and i'd have the problem "solved" in a few minutes).

5) Why new stories on this in the mass market media? These viruses can be crippling. Even to people who have enough computer skills to research the topics properly. I can't imagine how computer illiterate people deal with these issues. I'm assuming they just buy a new PC or hand over a lot of cash to the geeksquad to try to fix the problem (which is likely a reformat/reinstall.

I posted a question yesterday about my particular problem and look forward to your response. Thanks again for providing this invaluable service.

Best,

Jeff

#3 boopme

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 03:13 PM

Hello and welcome ,I merged the 2 topics together as we will address it here and avoid other replies at the the other topic.

1) If one has a particularly malicious version of antivirus pro (e.g. can't run programs, can't run regedit, can't run in safe mode) is there a good chance they have a rootkit and will need to reformat?
A very good chance

2) If I were to buy a new computer, would I be able to transfer data/pictures from my infected PC to an external HD (e.g. mybook) and not worry about infecting my new pc/mac?
Yes this can be done.
2 guidelines/rules when backing up

1) Backup all your important data files, pictures, music, work etc... and save it onto an external hard-drive. These files usually include .doc, .txt, .mp3, .jpg etc...
2) Do not backup any executables files or any window files. These include .exe/.scr/.htm/.html/.xml/.zip/.rar files as they may contain traces of malware. Also, .html or .htm files that are webpages should also be avoided.

3) How different/unique are the strains of this virus? Seems to me like everyone has some variant and I'm surprised there's not a sticky at the top that addresses some of the common ones.

Some new variants of rootkits in the wild right now that will require custom scripts to remove the infection, the process must be completed by HJT team member.

4) Is this virus becoming more malicious over time? Seems like I've had other versions that were milder in the past (i.e. i could run a simple program like mbam and i'd have the problem "solved" in a few minutes).
see answer to #3

5) Why new stories on this in the mass market media? These viruses can be crippling. Even to people who have enough computer skills to research the topics properly. I can't imagine how computer illiterate people deal with these issues. I'm assuming they just buy a new PC or hand over a lot of cash to the geeksquad to try to fix the problem (which is likely a reformat/reinstall.
Fortunately we can remove these thru the HJT team.. Or actually a Reformat and Reinstall of your Operating system will fix this. So buying new is not needed.


I will post both instructions.
To run HJT/DDS.
Please follow this guide. Preparation Guide For Use Before Using Hijackthis. Then go here HijackThis Logs and Virus/Trojan/Spyware/Malware Removal ,click New Topic,give it a relevant Title and post that complete log.

Let me know if it went OK.



Reformatting

Not an unwise decision to make. In some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to your system that it cannot be completely cleaned or repaired. Wiping your drive, reformatting, and performing a clean install of the OS or doing a factory restore removes everything and is the safest action but I cannot make that decision for you.

Reformatting a hard disk deletes all data. If you decide to reformat, you can back up all your important documents, data files and photos. The safest practice is not to backup any autorun.ini or .exe files because they may be infected. Some types of malware may disguise itself by adding and hiding its extension to the existing extension of files so be sure you take a close look at the full name. After reformatting, as a precaution, make sure you scan these files with your anti-virus prior to copying them back to your hard drive.



Further reading:
Rootkits, backdoor Trojans, Botnets, and IRC Bots are very dangerous because they compromise system integrity by making changes that allow it to by used by the attacker for malicious purposes. Rootkits are used by Trojans to conceal its presence (hide from view) in order to prevent detection of an attacker's software and make removal more difficult. Many rootkits can hook into the Windows 32-bit kernel, and patch several APIs to hide new registry keys and files they install. They can disable your anti-virus and security tools to prevent detection and removal. Remote attackers use backdoors as a means of accessing and taking control of a computer that bypasses security mechanisms. This type of exploit allows them to steal sensitive information like passwords, personal and financial data which is send back to the hacker. To learn more about these types of infections, you can refer to:

What danger is presented by rootkits?
Rootkits and how to combat them
r00tkit Analysis: What Is A Rootkit

If your computer was used for online banking, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it, you should disconnect from the Internet until your system is cleaned. All passwords should be changed immediately to include those used for banking, email, eBay, paypal and online forums. You should consider them to be compromised and change each password using a clean computer, not the infected one. If not, an attacker may get the new passwords and transaction information. If using a router, you need to reset it with a strong logon/password so the malware cannot gain control before connect again. Banking and credit card institutions should be notified of the possible security breach. Because your computer was compromised please read:

How Do I Handle Possible Identify Theft, Internet Fraud and CC Fraud?
What Should I Do If I've Become A Victim Of Identity Theft?
Identity Theft Victims Guide - What to do


Although the infection has been identified and may be removed, your PC has likely been compromised and there is no way to be sure the computer can ever be trusted again. It is dangerous and incorrect to assume the computer is secure even if the malware appears to have been removed. In some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to your system that it cannot be completely cleaned or repaired so you can never be sure that you have completely removed a rootkit. The malware may leave so many remnants behind that security tools cannot find them. Tools that claim to be able to remove rootkits cannot guarantee that all traces of it will be removed. Many experts in the security community believe that once infected with this type of malware, the best course of action is to wipe the drive clean, reformat and reinstall the OS. Please read:

When should I re-format? How should I reinstall?
Help: I Got Hacked. Now What Do I Do?
Where to draw the line? When to recommend a format and reinstall?


Should you decide not to follow that advice, we will do our best to help clean the computer of any infections but we cannot guarantee it to be trustworthy or that the removal will be successful. Some infections are difficult to remove completely because of their morphing characteristics which allows the malware to regenerate itself. Sometimes there is another hidden piece of malware which has not been detected by your security tools that protects malicious files and registry keys (which have been detected) so they cannot be permanently deleted. Disinfection will probably require the use of more powerful tools than we recommend in this forum. Before that can be done you will need you to create and post a DDS/HijackThis log for further investigation. Let me know how you wish to proceed.

The best proceedure is a low level format. This completely wipes the drive. Then reinstall the OS.
Use the free version of Active@ KillDisk.
Or Darik's Boot And Nuke

The best sources of Information on this are
Reformatting Windows XP
Michael Stevens Tech

Of course also feel free to ask anything on this in the XP forum. They'd be glad to help.

==============================

2 guidelines/rules when backing up

1) Backup all your important data files, pictures, music, work etc... and save it onto an external hard-drive. These files usually include .doc, .txt, .mp3, .jpg etc...
2) Do not backup any executables files or any window files. These include .exe/.scr/.htm/.html/.xml/.zip/.rar files as they may contain traces of malware. Also, .html or .htm files that are webpages should also be avoided.

Download Belarc Advisor - builds a detailed profile of your installed software and hardware, including Microsoft Hotfixes, and displays the results in your Web browser.
Run it and then print out the results, they may be handy.

Since we don't know exactly which infections we're dealing with here, we should take some precautions before we attempt to move files from the infected machine. Run the following on your clean computer, and make sure you insert your flash drives at the prompt.
Download and Run FlashDisinfector

Please download Flash_Disinfector.exe by sUBs and save it to your desktop.
  • Double-click Flash_Disinfector.exe to run it and follow any prompts that may appear.
  • The utility may ask you to insert your flash drive and/or other removable drives. Please do so and allow the utility to clean up those drives as well.
  • Hold down the Shift key when inserting the drive until Windows detects it to keep autorun.inf from executing if it is present.
  • Wait until it has finished scanning and then exit the program.
  • Reboot your computer when done.
Note: As part of its routine, Flash_Disinfector will create a hidden folder named autorun.inf in each partition and every USB drive that was plugged in when you ran it. Do not delete this folder...it will help protect your drives from future infection by keeping the autorun file from being installed on the root drive and running other malicious files.


Reinstall Windows Vista
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