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computer trying to communicate with IANA


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#1 pliny

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 09:40 PM

Could someone please help with this problem.
I have just installed outpost firewall that is asking me to block or allow unknown program which is trying to connect to ip address 192.88.99.1 which is in Galway, Ireland. Can't get much understandable info from google! Here is an old posting http://forums.speedguide.net/archive/index.php/t-25891.html which concerna me. Bit out there but would love some feedback from u pundits here. Am still a newbie to this so if u can minimise the tech jargon i would truly appreciate.

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#2 ThunderZ

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 10:27 PM

Whois says THIS about the IP.

IANA Located in Marina del Rey, California, U.S.A.

Did not read the post at Speedguide.

#3 pliny

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Posted 06 September 2009 - 01:34 AM

Not to be rude but it is that post at speedguide that has me here to ask what you buffs can illuminate me with. Because it all means zilch to me. Just want to know why my computer is communicating withthis foriegn address?

#4 ThunderZ

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Posted 06 September 2009 - 07:52 AM

Not enough info in the post and nothing proven.

Where are you getting Galway, Ireland?
I did a tracert for 192.88.99.1 It does appear to leave the U.S from New York after multiple hops within the U.S. The final IP prior to 192.88.99.1 is 130.244.218.141 which comes back to;

OrgName: RIPE Network Coordination Centre
OrgID: RIPE
Address: P.O. Box 10096
City: Amsterdam
StateProv:
PostalCode: 1001EB
Country: NL


Would not be overly concerned. There are constant "probes" always happening on the Internet. Most are purely for commercial reasons.
Having said that, I am far from an expert but am not going to take the time to trace every ping\probe that hit`s my network or that of others.

Get yourself a good router, configure it properly and do`t lose any sleep over it.

#5 tos226

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 04:05 PM

IANA issues IP addresses to domains. Totally legitimate.

Outpost, when it sees unknown application is asking you whether to permit connection or running or both.
You have to decide whether the program is known to you and unknown YET to Outpost, if Outpost is in learning mode or Rule advice mode.
If the program is really unknown, block it. You can even block it if it's known and see what happens.
Also make sure you distinguish, in Outpost, whether it asks if to connect or if to run, as the two dialogs look very similar.

I just glanced at the first 2-3 posts in the speedguide thread. It's 9 years old, not much there really.

Sometimes computer has to find the IP address even of a local PC. It might endup at IANA to query their servers.
IANA will return active domain names or BLACKHOLE, which means the address is unreachable from the internet, such as computers inside protected company networks (usually 10.x.x.x range), your own PC behind a router (usually 192,168.x.x range), and several other such ranges.

Then again, if you have some dirt on the computer, Outpost might well be correct in flagging whatever it is that's calling out. If you can't be bothered figuring out what it is, just BLOCK it. Scan the computer with a good antivirus, perhaps it'll see something.




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