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Does a router affect internet speed?


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14 replies to this topic

#1 JackieP

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 07:46 PM

Hopefully I can ask for help with this.

I have Comcast and the speed is supposed to be 6Mbps. My internet connection has been slow lately. I have a wired D-link EBR 2310 router. Comcast tells me that a router can interfere with internet speed. Is that true? My OS is Windows XP Pro, use Firefox and I'm using a Dell laptop.

I did a speed test on speed.io:

Results from http://www.speed.io
(Copied on 2009-09-03 20:38:29)
Download: 3972 Kbit/s
Upload : 1421 kbit/s
Connects : 857 conn/min
Ping: 100 ms

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 04:26 PM

Whomever told you that...you probably ought never to ask for advice again.

Connection speed will always vary...based on many factors such as time connected, system overload, equipment used by ISP, network saturation due to neighborhood, and so on.

But I've never heard of the router as being one of the many factors.

http://ezinearticles.com/?Why-is-my-Reside...?&id=145690

BTW: You left out a key word when quoting that speed Comcast mentioned...maximum. You might ask them when you can reasonably expect to see that rate...the answer will be "never".

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#3 cpumelter

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Posted 06 September 2009 - 07:26 AM

I have Comcast and the same router as you; I am supposed to have 10Mbps down, & I registered just over 6 at that site. Go Comcast... :thumbsup:

#4 ThunderZ

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Posted 06 September 2009 - 08:06 AM

@ JackieP & Cpumelter.

What Louis said. If you read the fine print you will most likely see the words "up to" xxMbps somewhere in there.

#5 cpumelter

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 06:18 AM

Thunder, you are correct...I know when I have talked to Comcast tech in the past, they tell me that is considered a max speed, not sustained...

#6 Daniel326

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 05:48 PM

if you want call comcast and have them come out and check that you are at full connection. They checked mine and seen that they had old equiptment and they changed it out. It's just a call away and you pay for the service so they should come out.

#7 Animal

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 10:30 PM

To answer your question, no, a properly configured and fully operational router will not be a cause for bandwidth issues. Configured improperly or having operational issues, it is possible.

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#8 the_patriot11

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 11:09 PM

most routers are designed to handle at least 100 mb bandwidth, so 6 will not strain it, unless you have like over 100 computers all using it, in which case I suspect several things, A: your a genious for getting 100 computers hooked up to a normal router and B: the router is the least of your worries. Unless the router is not working right, there should be no reason that router would be slowing you down. The actual internet connection will bottleneck you more then the router.

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#9 pcar

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 07:25 AM

No way your router is a problem. The tech was... uninformed.

My Comcast speeds vary a lot (download 10-15Mb/s. upload ~5-8Mb/s) depending on the time of day and where the servers are located. This site has a bunch of servers all over the country.

http://www.speakeasy.net/speedtest/

Good Luck

#10 sleepwalker

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 12:14 AM

Try this test site it compares your results with the average from your provider and all of North America and the world speedtest.net

#11 JackieP

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Posted 25 July 2012 - 06:38 PM

Try this test site it compares your results with the average from your provider and all of North America and the world speedtest.net


Thanks!

#12 LOVEMYPC

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 11:07 AM

HI,I have COMCAST as well and they told if could afford it i could get up to 12mps,but may be i am losing it in my old
age,but no matter what is coming down the line to the back side of your PC i would think you can only use what your PC
will be able to use.
To me it is like hooking up a 4"fire hose to a 1"garden hose you will only get what the 1" garden hose will allow to the
the connection to the back side cable hook up is this a fair assumption,THANK'S

#13 rotor123

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:40 PM

I'll put it this way I had a cheap generic router, When I replaced it with a brand name router with Gigabit ports my throughput went up.

My take on it is that a slow CPU and limited memory in the router can make a difference in speed. Especially with several users.

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#14 hamluis

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 12:07 PM

<<I had a cheap generic router, When I replaced it with a brand name router with Gigabit ports...>>

Well...that makes sense when you move from a non-Gigabit router...to one with Gigabit capability :).

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080506210145AAHyvEg

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#15 creplogle

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 01:51 PM

Not entirely true.  I had a similar problem and it turned out it was related to QOS settings in my router. My upstream bandwidth was set too low. I found a post that suggested I set the upstream setting to 40,000 and I went from .72 Mbps, which is what I had before my upgrade from 1Mbps to 10Mbps up. After I changed my upstream to the suggested 40,000 I got right around 10 Mbps! However, when changed QOS and set the upstream to Auto, instead of Manual which is where the 40,000 setting was, I got a little better upload, but my download increased 10Mbps or so to around 64 Mbps. I pay for 100 Mbps down / 10 Mbps up. I'm with Suddenlink in a rural area. 

 

So double check you have QOS enabled and try increasing your upstream bandwidth.






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