Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

wireless broadband that requires Windows Live, WHY?


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 Eagle7

Eagle7

  • Members
  • 267 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 02 September 2009 - 06:20 PM

Hi Folks,

Our rural area FINALLY has wireless broadband access via our local phone company, Qwest - but only up to 1.5 Mbps. The advert for it states that the use of Windows Live is required, or MSN premium. Since I know so little about wireless to begin with, I thought I'd ask you guys before I call them and see what they say. Apparently, Macs can use this service if they browse on Firefox, but it won't work with Safari. I hope to have a Mac someday. In the meantime, I'm using Win XP SP3, and once my other computer is hooked up it has Xandros on it, a flavor of Linux I believe.

What's a person supposed to do that would rather not bother with Microsoft stuff? Why would I have to use MS software to get/maintain a wireless connection? The only other wireless service we have in our area, we personally cannot get line of sight to their tower. Satellite is cost prohibitive. Any ideas out there? Thanks in advance.

Eagle7

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Romeo29

Romeo29

    Learning To Bleep


  • Members
  • 3,194 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:127.0.0.1
  • Local time:03:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 08:23 AM

Here is your advertisement : http://www.qwest.com/residential/internet/...ummary-1_5.html

It does not say Windows Live is required. It says the package includes Windows Live, which means you would get it for free.

You'll also get Windows Live™ which includes:

*
Windows Live™ OneCare™
FREE security and performance service ($49.95 value)
*
Family Safety
choose the web content your children see
*
Photo Gallery
share your photos and videos
*
Windows Live™ Toolbar
one-click access to Windows Live services



BTW, 1.5 MB/s for $20 a month is great :thumbsup: 1.5 MB/s is good enough for daily usage of internet.

#3 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,259 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:01:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 09:01 AM

What Romeo said :thumbsup:

Fun fact: The page referenced, touting Microsoft products is hosted on a Linux server. :flowers:

Edited by Amazing Andrew, 04 September 2009 - 09:02 AM.


#4 Queen-Evie

Queen-Evie

    Official Bleepin' G.R.I.T.S. (and proud of it)


  • Staff Emeritus
  • 16,485 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:My own little corner of the universe (somewhere in Alabama). It's OK, they know me here
  • Local time:03:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 11:26 AM

Here is your advertisement : http://www.qwest.com/residential/internet/...ummary-1_5.html
It does not say Windows Live is required. It says the package includes Windows Live, which means you would get it for free.


Most likely you will be able to choose whether or not to install the "extras" on your system.
Most ISP's partner with various security and other program vendors which will allow customers of the ISP to install
the programs without having to purchase them.

If you don't want the product, don't install it.

#5 Romeo29

Romeo29

    Learning To Bleep


  • Members
  • 3,194 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:127.0.0.1
  • Local time:03:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 01:08 PM

What Romeo said :flowers:

Fun fact: The page referenced, touting Microsoft products is hosted on a Linux server. :inlove:


MS products are for selling, Linux is for using :thumbsup:
Hey! Qwest internet is highly advised, brilliant people there :trumpet:

#6 Eagle7

Eagle7
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 267 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 02:12 PM

Here is your advertisement : http://www.qwest.com/residential/internet/...ummary-1_5.html

It does not say Windows Live is required. It says the package includes Windows Live, which means you would get it for free.


Hi,

Here's what I'm seeing:


Online Offer! Special 12-Month Pricing!
Get this special pricing online when you order Qwest High-Speed Internet® with basic phone service.Offer is available on orders of 1.5 Mbps speed tier or higher and requires Windows Live™.

I'm going to call them in a bit and see what they say. Thanks.

#7 Eagle7

Eagle7
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 267 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 02:13 PM

What Romeo said :flowers:

Fun fact: The page referenced, touting Microsoft products is hosted on a Linux server. :inlove:


MS products are for selling, Linux is for using :thumbsup:
Hey! Qwest internet is highly advised, brilliant people there :trumpet:



Awesome! Do as I say, not as I do, huh? Thanks for the funny.

#8 Eagle7

Eagle7
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 267 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 04:19 PM

Okay folks,

I did just order Qwest's DSL service after confirming with a guy in Tech Support that the MS software is not required. Then WHY did they put that in print, I wonder??

Being brand new to DSL and wireless at that, can someone point me in the right direction to study up on anything I should know, like configuring this new modem for the best security possible? Thanks so much.

#9 Tisiphone

Tisiphone

  • Members
  • 8 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Chicago
  • Local time:03:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 04:24 PM

Being brand new to DSL and wireless at that, can someone point me in the right direction to study up on anything I should know, like configuring this new modem for the best security possible? Thanks so much.


It totally depends on the modem type and manufacturer. A lot of them are extremely dumb.

I assume with multiple computers you'll be purchasing a router as well; if the modem has limited access or few security options, I'd suggest setting up firewall rules on the router, instead.

Edit: Are you getting wireless broadband or DSL?

Edited by Tisiphone, 04 September 2009 - 04:26 PM.


#10 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,259 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:01:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 04:25 PM

Modems don't usually come with any sort of security baked in at all. You will want to put either a router or hardware firewall between your computer and the modem. Routers are pretty cheap nowadays and almost always include a firewall built in. I like Linksys 54G routers because they support OpenWRT.

#11 Eagle7

Eagle7
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 267 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 04:54 PM

Being brand new to DSL and wireless at that, can someone point me in the right direction to study up on anything I should know, like configuring this new modem for the best security possible? Thanks so much.


It totally depends on the modem type and manufacturer. A lot of them are extremely dumb.

I assume with multiple computers you'll be purchasing a router as well; if the modem has limited access or few security options, I'd suggest setting up firewall rules on the router, instead.

Edit: Are you getting wireless broadband or DSL?


Okay, I've had one computer on dial up forever, but do have a 2nd older computer I'd like to hook up wirelessly, so this is the "modem" that Qwest is telling me to use:

Sorry, I can't seem to copy/paste their picture of it. But, here's their description. I might now more on the specs when I receive a copy of the order in my email shortly. I asked about the security of it and was told it includes "encryption and other ... for security." Does that sound about right?

Wireless Modem
Connect up to 5 computers
Advanced Modem

* Wireless Internet connectivity for up to 5 computers
* WiFi Certified and compatible with all 802.11b and 802.11g devices
* Wireless security always on (unless modified)
* Supports Microsoft®Windows® 98SE, Windows 2000, Windows ME, Windows XP, Windows Vista™, Mac® OS-X

Best I can tell, Qwest is referring to this service as "Wireless DSL". Make sense?

#12 Eagle7

Eagle7
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 267 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 04:59 PM

Modems don't usually come with any sort of security baked in at all. You will want to put either a router or hardware firewall between your computer and the modem. Routers are pretty cheap nowadays and almost always include a firewall built in. I like Linksys 54G routers because they support OpenWRT.


Currently, one of my puters is XP Home SP3, and the other is going to be some flavor of Linux. Do I need a router that says it will specifically support Linux or will the others like the one you mention above support both? Will I need the Linux supporting one if only one of my puters runs Linux, and will it support both Windows and Linux? Thanks? Oh, and in this wireless case, does the above router act as a modem, too?

#13 Tisiphone

Tisiphone

  • Members
  • 8 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Chicago
  • Local time:03:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 05:46 PM

Currently, one of my puters is XP Home SP3, and the other is going to be some flavor of Linux. Do I need a router that says it will specifically support Linux or will the others like the one you mention above support both? Will I need the Linux supporting one if only one of my puters runs Linux, and will it support both Windows and Linux? Thanks? Oh, and in this wireless case, does the above router act as a modem, too?


Almost any home-use router simply uses a web interface, so a web browser. The Windows software disks that Netgear and Linksys give you, for example, are just an animated "plug in cable here" walkthrough, and batch scripts that configure some very basic Windows network settings. (On all the ones I've set up, the instructions have been on paper, too).

It sounds like the thing that Qwest is giving you is a hybrid wireless receiver and router, though. That's great, as long as it has some sort of built in security options. If it doesn't, or you have no access to the device settings, I would still put in an intermediate router or firewall. Software firewalls just aren't as reliable. Its a big change going from a dial up connection to an always-on internet connection.

With a manufacturer or model number of their magic black box, there might be more to go on.

"Wireless DSL" is really a misnomer, but I can see why Qwest is using it (for simplicity's sake and comparison in speed).

Edited by Tisiphone, 04 September 2009 - 05:47 PM.


#14 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,259 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:01:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 05:50 PM

Routers are operating system agnostic. All modern operating systems have network stacks that conform to the TCP/IP suite, ethernet, and the 802.11 wireless networking protocols.

What that means in plain English is that Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, BSD, or whatever operating system you can think of can all use the same router and all routers are (insofar as supporting any OS is concerned) created equally.

The Linksys 54G routers I mentioned are also wifi access points. Many consumer grade routers these days are also wifi routers. You'll pretty much have no trouble at all setting up a mixed host network with any wireless-capable router on the market. I'd avoid D-Link and Belkin, though, as they're products (IMVHO) suck.

#15 Eagle7

Eagle7
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 267 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:50 PM

Posted 04 September 2009 - 06:35 PM

It sounds like the thing that Qwest is giving you is a hybrid wireless receiver and router, though. That's great, as long as it has some sort of built in security options. If it doesn't, or you have no access to the device settings, I would still put in an intermediate router or firewall. Software firewalls just aren't as reliable. Its a big change going from a dial up connection to an always-on internet connection.

With a manufacturer or model number of their magic black box, there might be more to go on.

"Wireless DSL" is really a misnomer, but I can see why Qwest is using it (for simplicity's sake and comparison in speed).


Okay, I just learned from a Qwest tech that it will be a Motorola ADSL 3347 that I'll be receiving. He figures it'll be compatible with any OS. He also said it was configurable for security based on the strength of my password. Sound about right? I will pay strict attention to that when it arrives as I want to make my computer as safe as I can. Thanks for your info, much appreciated.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users