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XP NOBOOTS AND OTHERS


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#1 ~overkill~

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 05:51 PM

Most of the no boot problems are probably the same as I just experienced. Some sites for xp hotfix are incomplete. Key files missing from components screw the entire system up. Make sure that the hotfix items are certified or get sp2 by paying money. Otherwise you will lose your system

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#2 Enthusiast

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 08:19 PM

Most of the no boot problems are probably the same as I just experienced. Some sites for xp hotfix are incomplete. Key files missing from components screw the entire system up. Make sure that the hotfix items are certified or get sp2 by paying money. Otherwise you will lose your system

You do not need to pay for SP 2.

Microsoft will send you an SP 2 cd free of charge.

Safer computing starts with Windows XP Service Pack 2, a free upgrade
Windows XP SP2 brings users the latest security updates and innovations from Microsoft. Here's how to get it.
http://www.microsoft.com/smallbusiness/pro...ice-pack-2.mspx

Steps to take before installing
Once it has been determined the system passes muster, additional steps must be taken to make certain the SP2 installation goes as smoothly as possible. These chores are important to make sure you don't compromise the effectiveness of the update, or worse.
These are the steps you are advised to take:
1. Back up all your data.
2. Check out the Web site of your hardware manufacturer to see if SP2-related hardware updates are available for download.
3. Purge your system of all spyware and adware you may have accumulated.
http://www.microsoft.com/smallbusiness/res...ows_xp_sp2.mspx


Major hardware manufacturers supporting SP2
The other two key housekeeping items checking for updates by hardware manufacturers and ridding your system of spyware and adware won't prevent disasters so much as they'll allow you to get the most out of the SP2 update.
Major PC makers such as Hewlett-Packard, Dell and Gateway take pains to make certain their products are in sync with major operating system upgrades. They do this by updating their drivers to accommodate SP2 and other upgrades.
It behooves you, then, to visit your manufacturer's Web site and check for driver updates related to Windows XP SP2. If an update is available, download it, because it has been designed to make your system function more smoothly in concert with SP2.
Spyware can derail the upgrade
How well a system functions is also directly related to the presence of spyware and adware on a computer.
Boyd, who has helped dozens of small-business users download SP2, says most of the problems he's encountered to date have to do with users unknowingly collecting spyware or adware. Spyware/adware is software from companies (often triggering pop-up ads) that users inadvertently get stuck with based on Web sites visited and other factors. It can "dramatically degrade the performance of a machine," Boyd says, and can also dramatically degrade the effectiveness of SP2.
After spyware has gained access to your computer via the Internet, it typically writes code directly to your PC's registry, which is a kind of command central from which a machine's operations are directed. This isn't always as sinister as it seems. Often, the freeware knowingly downloaded by users includes a proviso in its licensing agreement claiming the right to write code to the downloading computer's registry. The more code that's dropped into the registry, the slower the computer functions.
"If you've got 4,000 to 5,000 corrupt registry hacks and they all start at once," Boyd says, "all of a sudden a really good computer gets bogged down and begins to act like hardware that's five to 10 years old."
How to get rid of spyware
It's easy to know if you've been infected. A reduction of your PC's operating speed, a profusion of pop-ups, and a home page that keeps getting hijacked are telltale signs of a spyware or adware infection. But there's an even simpler test. Says Boyd: "If you're using the computer on the Internet, you've got it." Period.
So, yes, you've probably got it. How do you get rid of it?
A number of solutions to locate and remove spyware are available today, many of them free. Check out Microsoft's Windows AntiSpyware. One reason the Microsoft offering is an intriguing option is the fact that it offers real-time protection. That is, it alerts users whenever unsolicited attempts are being made to write to the computer's registry. The user can then either accept or reject the offering.
After you've purged your system of spyware and adware and followed these other steps, you're ready to download the Windows XP SP2 update. If you encounter difficulties or have questions, call 888-SP2-HELP for assistance.
http://www.microsoft.com/smallbusiness/res...ows_xp_sp2.mspx




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