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SNMP heating up - new unique problem...!


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#1 sunandoghosh

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Posted 17 July 2005 - 11:24 PM

SNMP heating up - new unique problem...!!!

Hey wonderful people here,

A new problem....??????? and faced for first time....

PROBLEM:

Presently desktop having SNMP of 220 Volts (most probably) but the entire machine gets very heated too soon.

The engineer saw and said that change SNMP to 350 Volts.

My system configuration:

P4 3 Ghz
512 MB RAM
80 SATA HDD
CD/DVD combo
inkjet printer

MY QUESTION

I actually fail to undrstand so much technical issues like volt etc...so

CAN ANYONE PLEASE SAY WHETHER I REALLY NEED TO CHANGE SNMP FROM PRESENT 220 volts to enginner suggested 350 volts...????????

Any idea / suggestion / advice...????

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#2 dc3

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 02:38 AM

Is the SNMP your referring to this: Short for Simple Network Management Protocol, a set of protocols for managing complex networks. The first versions of SNMP were developed in the early 80s. SNMP works by sending messages, called protocol data units (PDUs), to different parts of a network. SNMP-compliant devices, called agents, store data about themselves in Management Information Bases (MIBs) and return this data to the SNMP requesters. If it is, I'm really lost as far as understanding any relationship between that and any volgate over 12V. If you are talking about your line voltage in relationship to your PSU, then you need to be sure that the voltage switch on the PSU is on the 230V or 220V range as your line voltage appears to be 230V @ 50Hz. Where are you located please?

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