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BSOD on startup


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#1 acornman37

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 03:56 PM

Hi all,

My PC gives me a BSOD upon every startup. The windows loading screen starts up and before it finishes, it crashes. I've tried all safe mode configs and none work.

Here's the background. Sometime this morning I was minding my own business, and I got a message that said "some files that are required for windows XP to run properly have been replaced with unrecognizable versions. To maintain system stability, windows must restore the original versions of these files. Insert windows XP home edition CD now". I don't have a CD, so I just left it there stupidly. Spyware Search and Destroy told me that a file called msword95.exe was attempting to put itself into my startup folder. I kept on denying it, and ran Malwarebyte's Anti Malware to check for trojans. It detected 8 of them, and I clicked remove. I was prompted to restart to complete the removal, and when I rebooted, it crashed. Now I can't get into windows.

Reformatting windows would be my very last option because I have lots of un-backed up data. :thumbsup:

I read somewhere that I can use a Windows XP CD to restore the Master Boot Drive files (which are probably corrupted at the moment), which will allow me to boot properly. Is this a good idea?

I also have the option to obtain a second harddrive, replace my current one, set my current one as a slave to the new one, and transfer my data over. This should work if it were only the startup files that were corrupted.

Does anyone advise any particular course of action here? Any words of wisdom? Thanks.

Edited by The weatherman, 11 August 2009 - 04:49 PM.
Moved from XP to a more appropriate forum. Tw


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#2 Budapest

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 06:28 PM

Insert the Windows XP CD into the CD drive, and then restart the computer. Click to select any options that are required to start the computer from the CD drive if you are prompted. When the "Welcome to Setup" screen appears, press R to start the Recovery Console. If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot computer, select the installation that you must access from the Recovery Console. When you are prompted, type the Administrator password. If the administrator password is blank, just press ENTER.

Type: chkdsk /r

It's important to have a space before the "/".

To exit the Recovery Console and restart the computer, type exit at the command prompt, and then press ENTER.
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#3 acornman37

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Posted 15 August 2009 - 10:23 PM

Thanks for the reply.

Before I execute this, what does this command actually do? Will it recover the boot drives, scan the drives, solve the problem completely...?

#4 Budapest

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 03:05 AM

Chkdsk (Chkdsk.exe) is a command-line tool that checks volumes for problems. The tool then tries to repair any that it finds. For example, Chkdsk can repair problems related to bad sectors, lost clusters, cross-linked files, and directory errors. To use Chkdsk, you must log on as an administrator or as a member of the Administrators group.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315265
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#5 acornman37

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 12:45 PM

Ok, I followed your instruction, and after inputting the chkdsk /r , I got this message:

"The volume appears to contain one or more unrecoverable problems."

#6 Budapest

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 04:22 PM

Sounds like your hard drive may be failing. What is the make and model number of your computer?
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#7 acornman37

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 07:14 PM

I built the computer myself using retail components.

I don't believe the harddrive is dead or anything because as I said in the first post, I received some malware and file corruption warnings just prior to the crashing.

#8 Budapest

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 07:15 PM

What make of hard drive do you have?
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#9 acornman37

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 08:23 PM

Mine is a Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 ST3400620AS 400GB hard drive.

Do you know anything about a software called TestDisk? Is it reputable?
http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk

#10 Budapest

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 08:28 PM

I've never heard of TestDisk (which doesn't mean it's not good).

Try running a diagnostic test on the drive using SeaTools for DOS:

http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/support/downloads/seatools/
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#11 acornman37

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 11:14 PM

I ran the "Long Test" and it passed. Here is the resulting log:

"Device 0 is Seagate Device ST3400620AS 5QG0CR78 On Generic PCI ATA
Max Native Address 781422767
Device is 48 Bit Addressed - Number of LBAs 781420654 (400.087 GB)
This drive Supports Security Features
SMART IS Suported and ENABLED
SMART Has NOT Been Tripped
DST Is Supported
Logging Feature Set Is Supported
POH 2397 Current Temp 33

Started Long Test 8/16/2009 @ 22:14.21
Long Test PASSED 8/16/2009 @ 0:03.43"

#12 Budapest

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 11:20 PM

Boot back into the Recovery Console and type this command:

fixboot

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documen...t.mspx?mfr=true
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#13 acornman37

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 11:46 AM

After putting "fixboot" into the command prompt, I get a message:

"FIXBOOT cannot find the system drive, or the drive specified is not valid."

#14 Budapest

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 05:09 PM

Here's another command you can try from the Recovery Console:

fixmbr

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documen...r.mspx?mfr=true
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#15 acornman37

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 06:26 PM

Hmm, I'm a little hesitant to run that command because of what's been said here:

http://www.tech-archive.net/Archive/WinXP/...8/msg02261.html

It says running FIXMBR while a virus or something of that nature is present may damage the partition tables.




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