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Looking to get into programming


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15 replies to this topic

#1 KamakaZ

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 06:24 PM

Hi guys/girls,

I've been searching this forum (and have seen the amount of posts asking "how to learn...") but still i find myself adding to the collection...

I've been keen on getting into programming for a while now but haven't found the time, until now. As i have seen from the other posts there are a HUGE amount of languages! I guess my question is, for a beginner like me, where should i start and also, i'm guessing certain languages are used for specific tasks? Such as Java for simple games or something... So i'm wondering if someone could sorta give a quick description of what some common languages are used for?

If someone wouldn't mind giving me a kick start, that'd be great :thumbsup:

Well... I'm off to googling it again...

Thanks in advance,

Kam

Edited by KamakaZ, 10 August 2009 - 06:26 PM.

There's no place like 127.0.0.1
There are 10 types of people in the world, those that can read binary, and those who can't.


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#2 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 06:38 PM

Well you've just ignited the age old flame war :thumbsup:

I'd start with Visual Basic -- it stinks but it does a good job of getting you used to programming and is more readable than competing languages. Java and C# are more -- "Big Boy" languages once you're comfortable.

Finally, something like C gives you unparalleled access to hardware -- but at the expense of functionality that C#, Java, and VisualBasic.NET provide for you.

Most languages are general purpose -- you can use them for a number of different things. The only "specialty" of which I am aware is that a program written in Java can run unmodified on alternate operating systems.

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Twitter - My statements do not establish the official position of Microsoft Corporation, and are my own personal opinion. (But you already knew that, right?)
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#3 KamakaZ

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 06:46 PM

A while back i did start on visual basic, good to know i was heading in the right direction! I will get back on the horse then :thumbsup:

So different languages can be used to do the same thing? (sorry this is kinda confusing even myself!) I guess what i'm trying to say, with web design, you have your basic HTML for begginers, then you can get creative with php, asp and databases. See php maybe be better suited for one task rather than asp, (i think i can understand that), it's not like that with programming?

you mention Visual Basic and VisualBasic.NET, any difference between the two?

Thanks Billy3

EDIT: Next question is, what program do i use to program in Visual Basic? Visual Basic 2008 Express Edition?

Edited by KamakaZ, 10 August 2009 - 07:03 PM.

There's no place like 127.0.0.1
There are 10 types of people in the world, those that can read binary, and those who can't.


#4 groovicus

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 07:50 PM

Yes, different languages can be used to do the same thing. Some are more suited for some tasks than others, but at their core all languages do the same things. Php and Asp do the same thing; one is open source, and one is part of the Microsift stack.

Just pick a language and learn it. Billy prefers VB for a learner language; I prefer Java or C#, and they are equally readable. C is a good language, but very different from Java, VB, or C#. And just for clarification, HTML is not a programming language, nor is CSS.

#5 KamakaZ

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 08:13 PM

I know php and asp do the same thing, that was what i was kinda pointing out... but the languages (structure wise) are different. I agree HTML and CSS are NOT a programming language.

Still, where to start... Java, C#, VB? Then, what do i use to compile the program?

There's no place like 127.0.0.1
There are 10 types of people in the world, those that can read binary, and those who can't.


#6 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 08:15 PM

*Bill puts teacher hat on......

Well.. what does google tell you? :thumbsup:

Billy3
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#7 KamakaZ

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 08:17 PM

Sorry Billy3, which part are you meaning?

There's no place like 127.0.0.1
There are 10 types of people in the world, those that can read binary, and those who can't.


#8 KamakaZ

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 08:34 PM

I've been reading up on the three i mentioned above... i think i'm going to give java a crack, as it can be embeded into webpages which may come in handy :thumbsup:

There's no place like 127.0.0.1
There are 10 types of people in the world, those that can read binary, and those who can't.


#9 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 08:41 PM

Still, where to start... Java, C#, VB? Then, what do i use to compile the program?

Well.. what does google tell you? :thumbsup:


Twitter - My statements do not establish the official position of Microsoft Corporation, and are my own personal opinion. (But you already knew that, right?)
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#10 groovicus

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 08:57 PM

i think i'm going to give java a crack

I think you may have misunderstood something, because Java can not be embedded in a web page, nor can any other language except javascript. Java can be embedded in the page that creates the webpage, as can any other number of languages, but all that a browser understands is HTML, CSS, and Javascript.

#11 KamakaZ

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 08:59 PM

Aha... ok so for java programming, google tells me i need:

- The Java Development Kit (JDK) for Java SE 6.
- NetBeans IDE
- Java EE SDK

*off to download Netbeans :thumbsup:

There's no place like 127.0.0.1
There are 10 types of people in the world, those that can read binary, and those who can't.


#12 groovicus

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 09:35 PM

Let me know if you have any problems.....

#13 KamakaZ

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 10:00 PM

Major web browsers soon incorporated the ability to run Java applets within web pages, and Java quickly became popular.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_(programming_language)


Thanks guys :thumbsup:

There's no place like 127.0.0.1
There are 10 types of people in the world, those that can read binary, and those who can't.


#14 DemiReticent

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 02:38 PM

You can do just about anything with all of the BIG languages with more or less difficulty. Although Java doesn't have nearly the kind of low level access that C derivatives do. Java is more about user interaction than system interaction.

Languages don't really become specialized until you reach the high-level languages. Python isn't exactly specialized for any task but it is designed to be quick, easy, and intuitive. I wouldn't recommend starting there if you've never programmed before though because it might be difficult to grasp without programming knowledge in a more structured language.

AutoHotkey for example is designed to script macros and makes writing simple GUI-type apps very easy. I used it to program a drop-down menu to hold my shortcuts so I could clean up my desktop and use it more as a temp holding area for whatever I'm working on that I haven't yet filed away.

#15 BubbaT

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 12:17 AM

Look at my post in this thread:
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/246959/i-want-to-learn-to-program/
It is not 100% what I would say to you but it is about 97%.




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