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RAID 1 problems


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#1 Stephen W

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Posted 07 August 2009 - 12:06 PM

I've had this PC for 10 weeks or so. I ordered a new custom machine with 4 Disks (2 Pairs in RAID 1) for reliability and to avoid losing my system and data should one of my disks fail. The 1st array is for the OS and installed programs and the second array is for my data.
Yesterday when I switched on my machine I got the message that the 1st array status was critical and it suggested that 1 disk was not responding or had failed. The screen went black and the machine would not boot.
I had a look in the BIOS at the boot settings and found listed under boot devices the following:
RAID array 2
RAID array 3
Single Disk 1
So I selected Single Disk 1 as the boot device and the machine started up and I was able to get into Windows. Under Computer I could see the operational data array as D:\ but I could also see both disks from the failed array as C:\ and H:\. This suggests to me that neither of the disks has actually failed but that the RAID array has somehow become corrupted and needs to be rebuilt.
In the BIOS/RAID setup options there is no option to rebuild an array and my motherboard manual also does not give information on rebuilding an array - only creating one in the first place.

I called the company who I ordered the machine from as I got a free 3 year warrantee with the machine. They were very unhelpful and told me to search the internet for a fix! And I dont really want to have to ship my machine back to them as firstly it will take a long time and secondly I am sure they will wipe my OS and restore the machine to base which is exactly what I was trying to avoid in getting a machine with RAID 1 setup in the first place. So I've been searching the internet without alot of success. What I did find was a program called AMD RAIDXpert. This has showed me that Drive on Port 1 is assigned to 'JBOD' which I believe means that is the disk I am booting to as 'Single Disk 1'. Drive on Port 3 is assigned to Raid 1 LD 1. Whilst both disks show up as having 150.03GB capacity, the disk on Raid 1 LD 1 has only assigned 149.97GB. The disk on JBOD has assigned the full 150.03GB. So I am wondering if maybe one disk has picked up a bad sector or some such thing which has effectively made the disks different sizes and resulted in the corruption on the RAID 1 array??????

If someone can try to help me out with this I'd really appreciate it as I work from this PC every day and really need it fixed and to know my RAID 1 is giving me a reliable backup!

My system spec is as follows:
OS: Vista 64 Bit
Motherboard: Asus M4A79T Deluxe
Chipset: AMD 790FX/ SB750
RAM: 4GB DDR3 1600MHz
Hard Drives: 2x 150GB WD Velociraptor 10,000rpm in RAID 1 (This is the failed OS array)
2x 500GB 7200rpm Drives in RAID 1 (for Data)
Graphics Card: ATI Radeon HD 4870 1GB

I think that may be all the info required? I will be pleased to send any more info or screenshots (even if I have to make them with a camera!) etc at request.

Thank you in advance to anybody that tries to help me. You don't know how much it means to me.

Edited by hamluis, 09 May 2011 - 07:48 AM.
Moved from Vista to Tips & Tricks.


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#2 Stephen W

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Posted 08 August 2009 - 05:42 PM

OK nobody has replied to me yet but I feel I am making some progress. I found this posted on another problem regarding a very similar (exact same) problem to my own:
START

Issue: AMD RaidXpert Service gives an Raid 1 (or 5, as reported in other forum) array "error" stating a single disk failure. One of the two drives (or may be more in your case, but if that's the case you are beyond screwed) in the Raid 1 array becomes a JBOD standalone drive, basically detached from the array for whatever reason. The drive is still listed as healthy and SMART scan does not show any issue either. It is simply "assigned as JBOD" under "Logical Drive View" in RaidXpert.

OR, you really have a dead drive, and you have inserted a new drive. But even after you have initialized it, the Rebuild tab is still greyed out.

The "reasonable" procedure, by intuition, since there is no manual, is to start RaidXpert in the browser (username and password by default are both "admin"), go to the "Logical Drive View" and do a "Rebuild". The problem is, the "Rebuild" tab is greyed out and unusable. You can only see the failed array listed as "Critical", one of the two drives (in my case) is still mounted as part of the Raid 1 array, but the other drive is now JBOD. This can also happen if the drive is new. It is simply "assigned" as a JBOD. And the "Rebuild" tab is still greyed out.

You basically cannot rebuild.

This problem has been reported on many forums and no one has provided a step-by-step solution. The AMD Help with the software is inaccurate and unhelpful.

Solution: Make sure that you have boot into the remaining Raid 1 drive and NOT the JBOD drive if the array was your system drive. This can be double-checked by going into the BIOS during POST and you should make sure that in the Boot sequence you are booting through the Raid array. If the array is not your system drive, this precaution is not necessary.

Start RaidXpert in Windows. After you have logged into RaidXpert, click "Logical Drive View" under "AMD RAIDXpert" -> "Logical Drive View". You can check the serial number of the working drive and the "JBOD" drive under Physical Drive View, you will see which drive has been assigned to the array and which one is assigned as JBOD. If you are using the new drive, you should see that its serial number is associated with the JBOD assignment. Make a note of that, and make sure you are not replacing the wrong drive.

Under "Logical Drive View", and to the right of the screen you will see "Delete" as a usable tab. Click on it. Do not worry, nothing will happen yet.

Under the "Delete" tab, you will find check boxes next to each one of your array and JBOD drive. Check the JBOD drive and click "Submit". You will see two warning messages telling you that the data in the JBOD disk will be erased. If this is your new drive, no problem, just hit "Ok". And the drive would disappear from the "Logical Drive View". If this was one of the two system drives, this is your last chance to make sure that this is not the drive you have booted into. If you are sure, hit "Ok", and the drive would disappear from the "Logical Drive View".

Once that's done, the Rebuild tab would appear. You can also see under "Physical Drive View" that this drive is no longer assigned, and is therefore "Spare and free" and can be used for Rebuilding.

Now hit "Rebuild" and the process will begin. And you are set.

END.

Now that all makes sense to me but the bit I am having trouble with I have highlighted in bold. My PC will not boot if I select 'RAID array 2' as the boot drive and will only boot if I select 'Single Disk 1'. So I am not sure if the disk I am booting into is the JBOD assigned disk or not. I think it is. And that is a problem as that means if I delete the JBOD disk using RAIDXpert as instructed then I may very well wipe out my OS and no longer be able to boot up.
I could prove this one way or the other if there is some way in windows to find the serial number of the disk I have booted into. Can anyone tell me how to find a Hard Drive serial number in Windows Vista for Drive C? Is it possible?

#3 Stephen W

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Posted 09 August 2009 - 07:06 AM

I managed to fix my problem and rebuild my Raid array using the solution described above. The biggest problem I had was that I could not work out if I was booting into the Disk assigned to the Raid 1 array or assigned to JBOD. In the end I unplugged each drive individually and tried to boot into each. Only 1 would boot at all and that drive was assigned to Raid 1 in RaidXpert (but was listed as 'Single Disk 1' in BIOS) so I was pretty sure I was booting into the disk needed. So I deleted the JBOD drive in RaidXpert as instructed and sure enough I was able to select rebuild and it was fixed in less than an hour.

Hopefully this thread will help someone else with the same problem.

#4 DoubleRam

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 09:44 AM

Hi Folks - New to this BB so I am saying hi!

However, I have a fix for the AMD RaidXpert issue which does not require you to delete your Raid setup.

1) As posted, verify which drive is your data drive. It should be pretty easy because it will be the only drive in your raid view. Or follow the instructions above to find the drive you have your data on.
2) Reboot and go into your raid bios (<CTRL>-F) for my board but your's may differ.
3) Now I'm going from memory - should have written it down.
4) Go to Raid view I believe this is Number 1.
5) you should see your raid drive and your single drive
6) Define a new raid (don't remember which control sequence it is but, it's at the bottom of your screen)
7) Your single drive should appear as the only drive available.
8) In the options make the drive "raid ready"
9) Select it as assigned
10) Give it a name
11) Verify your settings
13) Don't initialize the drive
14) Reboot
15) In Windoze open the Raidxpert page.
16) Under Spare drives you will now have the "create" option available.
17) Click Create
18) Select the drive you marked as "raid-ready" (this should be the only drive)
19) Click Go
20) Your Raid 1 or Raid 5/10 should automatically see this drive as available and start rebuilding the drive system.
21) if not you can hit rebuild under the logical drive view once you select your raid drive.

The key is with a new system, the Raid Bios sees a new drive as a single drive which is not part of any raid system. This is kind of a safe guard, you don't want the system to take any drive you plug in as the new spare. So - as I said the key is to make your new drive "Raid-Ready" so that the raid system knows this drive is it's spare and can rebuild your Raid system.

Let me know if you have any questions. This problem took me 2+ days to figure out running around BB- but This board gave me the right hint to go the "Raid-Ready" idea because I needed a spare drive not a single drive.

DMT

#5 Richard Timney

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Posted 08 May 2011 - 05:36 PM

I fixed my problem using combination of Stephen W and Doubleram...both steps are correct. I had to use combination of their steps to get around the drawback of ATI RaidXpert.

ASUS M4A88T:

1. I had 2 RAID1 drives that on a previous system had worked fine.
2. I connected them together to a new system and the RAID Bios only showed RAID1 array as critical.
3. Inside the RAID1 details page, it only listed one of the previous RAID drives, and the other as ??????-Missing, although the other was connected.
4. From the main RAID page, it did correctly detect the other drive, but did not show it as part of any JBOD or RAID.

Now copying the steps from Doubleram:

1) As posted, verify which drive is your data drive. It should be pretty easy because it will be the only drive in your raid view. Or follow the instructions above to find the drive you have your data on.
2) Reboot and go into your raid bios (<CTRL>-F) for my board but your's may differ.
3) Now I'm going from memory - should have written it down.
4) Go to Raid view I believe this is Number 1.
5) you should see your raid drive and your single drive
6) Define a new raid (don't remember which control sequence it is but, it's at the bottom of your screen)
7) Your single drive should appear as the only drive available. (....IN my case, several other drives also appeared but only select the one that should be part of the RAID array).
8) In the options make the drive "raid ready"
9) Select it as assigned
10) Give it a name
11) Verify your settings
13) Don't initialize the drive
14) Reboot
15) In Windoze open the Raidxpert page.

Now as mentioned in Stephen W's post, went into RAIDxpert, and selected DELETE, and only selected the RAID READY drive (do not select any other drive or you will lose data).

Once this "Raid Ready" drive was "deleted", I could now click on the "Logical Drive" link, and select the "Critical Raid Array" and nwo the Rebuild button was visible.

Clicking this started the rebuild automatically without asking which disk to mirror. It simply assumed (correctly) that the drive that was part of the critical RAID1 array should be the master drive.

Only thing in RaidXpert, you need to click Information again and then reclick REBUILD to see the progress.

#6 pjohann

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Posted 16 December 2011 - 07:20 PM

Hello gals & guys, - I’m new here as well …

… and I’d like to add some remarks to “DoubleRam’s” and “Stephen W’s” comments on how to rebuild a RAID array based on AMD’s SouthBridge chip sets: series 700, 800, 900.

Firstly two comments on RAIDXpert in general:

  • If the slightest data inconsistency occurs the RAID array will go instantly out of service (dis-arrays). This can happen any time and is the more likely the bigger the HDD is! It doesn’t necessarily mean that tone of the two HDDs went bad. It might be just a very seldom read/write error on one of the disks. So, before you discard the dropped HDD check it for errors (checkdisk) and first try to rebuild the array with the same disk!
  • The RAIDXpert manual provides no instruction at all on how to re-array a broken logical drive (LD). I don’t understand why especially this very frequent occurrence isn’t covered, - stupid !!!

Secondly: here comes the solution:

As mentioned under § 2 above; first try to rebuild with the dropped HDD.

  • Re-boot the system
  • On request hit the <ctrl-f> buttons to enter AMD’s ‘FastBuild Utility’
  • Hit first the key <1> entering ‘View Drive Assignments’ and to see all the working- as well as the critical LDs, let's call it LD(x); you’ll see also the dropped HDD either as ‘single disk’, or ‘free’ disk in the list.
  • Press <esc> to leave this menu chapter and go to ‘Define LD’ by hitting <2>.
  • Select any free LD # for set-up, # = y for instance.
  • In the ‘Define LD Menu’ select the ‘RAID READY’ entry; rest you can normally keep at the default values.
  • On the same screen below under ‘Drive Assignments’ select the ‘free’- or ‘single disk’ and change the ‘Assignment’ from entry ‘N’ to ‘Y’ = YES !
  • by doing this you’ve created an additional LD consisting of on ‘RAID READY’ disk only …
  • Save your changes by hitting several times <ctrl Y>. Entering ‘View Drive Assignments’ you could check again whether your adjustments were registered by the tool. If: yes -> re-boot the system.
  • You could stop the boot process after the BIOS’ HDD check by pressing <Pause>; you should be able to see again all the working arrays, the array which went critical showing “1x2 RAID(x)” blinking. – And the newly created LD(y) displaying as “1+0 RAID_READY” -> all fine so far …
  • Under Windows you start the ‘RAIDXpert’ utility.
  • You click ‘Logical Drive View’ on the left side of the screen.
  • On the right side click the ‘Delete’ tab! Don’t worry: nothing will be deleted yet!
  • But the view changes and will provide the ‘Logical Drive Overview’ with boxes under the ‘Select’ headline to tick mark.
  • Tick mark your just created new LD(y) which must show ‘RAID_READY’, click ‘Submit’. Your LD(y) disappears from the ‘Logical Drive Overview’.
  • Go back to the ‘AMD RAIDXpert’ tree to left screen side, highlight the critical “! RAID 1 LD(x)” logical drive and – magic – you’ll notice the green highlighted ‘Rebuild’ tab to the left.
  • Congratulations, done: now it’s the HD controller’s job to finish the work; - ‘Rebuild’ starts running showing the progress bar slowly moving.
  • Rebuild speed: ca. 400GB/h (on my GigaByte main board) …


#7 Nime

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:33 AM

My very fast & system alive solution (AMD RaidXpert -web admin- should be installed):

Confirmation part: We need to confirm the disk that will be deleted
* At web admin panel (http://pcname:25902/amd/) : Find the serial numbers of disks under Physical Drive View then find their port numbers. Match the pyscical disks and RAID/JBOD disks using port numbers.
* At PC case: Find the target disk from serial number. Usually JBOD is the dropped RAID disk. Unplug the SATA cable.
* Test the files, OS, system stability. If everything is OK re-plug the disk.

Rebuild part:
* Click Logical Drive View > Delete and select JBOD at exact port. Confirm & Delete.

That's it. Now RAID is being rebuilt. Check the progress status at the Events.

Edited by Nime, 23 January 2013 - 10:40 AM.





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