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Help me about dual booting


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#1 theinvulnerable

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 06:47 PM

Can i Dual boot same operating system on same volume?

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#2 Andrew

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 08:03 PM

Erm... I'm not entirely sure what you're asking, but I'll give it a whirl :thumbsup:

I'm assuming that you want to have two instances of the same operating system installed on your computer, both occupying the same logical volume of your hard drive.

I know that it's possible to have multiple kernels installed on the same partition under Linux, a setup wherein you choose which kernel you want to use at bootup. As for Windows... I don't know. Windows is a lot less modular that Linux is. One cannot simply create multiple copies of ntoskrnl.exe and expect NTLDR to know what to do about it.

It maybe possible, however... gimme a sec to think on it...

Ok, I think I've got it!

Warning: I've never done this. In fact, I have no idea whether this will actually work at all. This is something I just pulled out of my.. um.. brain two minutes ago and could potentially hose your system. Proceed with caution (and backups, of course) in place.

1. Install Windows as normal.
2. Boot into a LinuxLiveCD that supports reading and writing NTFS partitions. Mount the C: drive (should be hda1 or sda1)
3. Create a new folder at the root of the C: drive called WINDOWS1
4. Copy everything win the C:\WINDOWS folder over into the C:\WINDOWS1 folder. You should now have two folders, WINDOWS and WINDOWS1 with exactly the same contents.
5. Still in Linux, open the boot.ini file. You should see something like this:

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect

6. Add a second Operating Systems entry, duplicating the line already there except changing the part WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" to WINDOWS1="Microsoft Windows XP Professional 1":

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS1="Microsoft Windows XP Professional 1" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect


7. Reboot. If this actually works, then you should get a boot menu asking which one to boot. If it doesn't work... then I have no idea what will happen.


Further thoughts:

If this does work, then you will have two instances of Windows on the same partition. This could potentially make for some interesting collissions between the two since Windows always assumes that it's alone on a computer. For example, there will be only one C:\Program Files directory shared between the two Windowses. THis means that while a program may be installed under one Windows instance, it won't be installed under the other one unless you run the installer in both instances. This can be managed by making sure to install applications twice and into the same directory. This will overwrite the existing installation files with exactly the same files but will allow both instances to have the proper registry entries.

Other problems may occur at the filesystem level resulting in data corruption, but I consider that to be a remote possibility.

Is there any particular reason you don't want to create a second partition for your second Windows instance?

Edited by Amazing Andrew, 03 August 2009 - 08:18 PM.
tpyo


#3 hamluis

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 08:28 PM

It's possible to have two installs of XP on the same partition...but it not something that is recommended and this usually occurs when a user is attempting a repair install...but winds up with two installs of the same O/S on the same partition.

XP FAQ, Two XP Installs On Same Partition - http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/xpfaq.html#20

This is not considered dual-booting, since dual-booting normally is conceived of as two diferent operating systems.

Example: XP Home and XP Pro are two different O/Ses...installing each of them on a system would be considered a dual-boot.

Louis

#4 theinvulnerable

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 11:44 PM

Same volume? Sorry,what i mean is two partitioned space in my one hard drive whose installed by same operating system like what i did yesterday. i installed xp on other partitioned space that i created and then i installed once again the same windows xp cd that i used to installed the other on the second partitioned space. And i got bunch of error and blues screen. But what about installing same operating system but using different cd and different product key?

#5 hamluis

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 10:16 AM

I've never tried what you suggest...it makes no sense to me to install the same operating system on one system.

But...as long as they are on separate hard drives, it seems to me that it should be possible.

I've never installed on the same hard drive...too risky, for my tastes and I have an excess number of hard drives. But, as long as each is installed on a primary partition, it seems possible. I don't put my faith in one hard drive for anything.

If I wanted to install the same O/S on a system, I would just clone the existing O/S partition to another drive.

I cannot give you any better info than that.

Louis




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