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Do I need an additional Firewall software


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#1 rsa101

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 10:12 PM

My PC at work has a Kaspersky AV which I think has its own Firewall. I am just wondering if I need to get another firewall that would stop network hacking on my side? I am just concerned because lately I've been seeing incoming attempts to attack my PC and others as well. Can you recommend anything that could be done or more so an open source or free since the office is not keen on buying the licensed software. We are on a tight budget and computer softwares are just not a priority right now.

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#2 Chris S.

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 09:12 AM

Hi RSA,

Running multiple firewalls may cause application issues or intermittent connection problems. Kapersky does have a two-way firewall, just make sure your software updated.

Comodo firewall is another free solution if you decide to switch: http://www.comodo.com/home/internet-security/firewall.php. Keep in mind that most free solutions are licensed for personal use.

Running multiple software firewalls is unnecessary for typical home computers. Using two firewalls on the same connection could cause issues with connectivity to the Internet or other unexpected behavior. One firewall, whether it's the Windows Firewall or a different software firewall, can provide substantial protection for your computer. (Source)


-Chris

#3 rsa101

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 09:52 AM

Thanks for that info

#4 tos226

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 07:29 PM

rsa101,
Kaspersky AV is unlikely to include a firewall, but since you have it and I do not, you should check Kaspersky website for details. When I had their AV it did not have a firewall.
Kasperskly suite includes a firewall.
I think you need to show details about "incoming attempts". From where? What ports? read the logs. They might be from the LAN at work.
Does the work setup include a firewall? Are you talking what to setup at work or on your computer?

At work, often the main servers have a firewall, and then the desktops, individual workstations, have their own firewall. It is not at all clear from the question here what the situation is so a discussion of having or not having multiple firewalls might be premature.

#5 quietman7

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 12:00 PM

Using two software firewalls on a single computer could cause issues with connectivity to the Internet or other unexpected behavior. Further, running multiple software firewalls can cause conflicts that are hard to identify and troubleshoot. Only one of the firewalls can receive the packets over the network and process them. Sometimes you may even have a conflict that causes neither firewall to protect your connection. However, you can use a hardware firewall (a router) and a software firewall (Kerio or ZoneAlarm) in conjunction.

A hardware firewall is really a software firewall running on a dedicated piece of hardware or specialized device (routers, broadband gateways) that sits between a modem and a computer or network. A hardware firewall is based on "Network Address Translation" (NAT) which hides your computer from the Internet or NAT plus "Stateful Packet Inspection" (SPI). It can provide a strong degree of protection from most forms of attacks coming from the outside (incoming traffic). Hardware firewalls are easy to configure and can protect every machine on a local or home network. A hardware firewall typically uses packet filtering to examine the header of a packet to determine its source and destination addresses. This information is compared to a set of predefined or user-created rules that determine whether the packet is allowed (forwarded) or denied (dropped) on particular ports. They tend to treat any kind of traffic traveling from the local network out to the Internet as safe which can be a security risk.

With a software firewall you have customized control and can specify which applications are allowed to communicate (outgoing traffic) over the Internet from your computer. Programs that are not explicitly allowed to do so are either blocked or else the user is prompted for confirmation before the traffic is allowed to pass. Software firewalls generally offer the best measure of protection against Trojans and worms but they are harder to configure and must share resources with other running processes which can decrease system performance. Many software firewalls have user defined controls for setting up safe file and printer sharing and to block unsafe applications from running on your system.Choosing a firewall is a matter of personal preference, your technical ability/experience, features offered, the amount of resources utilized, how it may affect system performance and what will work best for your system. A particular firewall that works well for one person may not work as well for another. There is no universal "one size fits all" solution that works for everyone. You may need to experiment and find the one most suitable for your use.
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#6 Heafy

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 04:02 PM

Using two software firewalls on a single computer could cause issues with connectivity to the Internet or other unexpected behavior. Further, running multiple software firewalls can cause conflicts that are hard to identify and troubleshoot. Only one of the firewalls can receive the packets over the network and process them. Sometimes you may even have a conflict that causes neither firewall to protect your connection. However, you can use a hardware firewall (a router) and a software firewall (Kerio or ZoneAlarm) in conjunction.

A hardware firewall is really a software firewall running on a dedicated piece of hardware or specialized device (routers, broadband gateways) that sits between a modem and a computer or network. A hardware firewall is based on "Network Address Translation" (NAT) which hides your computer from the Internet or NAT plus "Stateful Packet Inspection" (SPI). It can provide a strong degree of protection from most forms of attacks coming from the outside (incoming traffic). Hardware firewalls are easy to configure and can protect every machine on a local or home network. A hardware firewall typically uses packet filtering to examine the header of a packet to determine its source and destination addresses. This information is compared to a set of predefined or user-created rules that determine whether the packet is allowed (forwarded) or denied (dropped) on particular ports. They tend to treat any kind of traffic traveling from the local network out to the Internet as safe which can be a security risk.

With a software firewall you have customized control and can specify which applications are allowed to communicate (outgoing traffic) over the Internet from your computer. Programs that are not explicitly allowed to do so are either blocked or else the user is prompted for confirmation before the traffic is allowed to pass. Software firewalls generally offer the best measure of protection against Trojans and worms but they are harder to configure and must share resources with other running processes which can decrease system performance. Many software firewalls have user defined controls for setting up safe file and printer sharing and to block unsafe applications from running on your system.

Choosing a firewall is a matter of personal preference, your technical ability/experience, features offered, the amount of resources utilized, how it may affect system performance and what will work best for your system. A particular firewall that works well for one person may not work as well for another. There is no universal "one size fits all" solution that works for everyone. You may need to experiment and find the one most suitable for your use.

In other words you should not run two different firewalls turn one off and use the better one.
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#7 tos226

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 09:27 PM

In other words you should not run two different firewalls turn one off and use the better one.

Re: " turn one off and use the better one". I disagree. Turning off a firewall normally leads to disasters of not being able to uninstall, or if not uninstalled, to conflicts with other firewalls. Even uninstalling is sometimes not sufficient, since traces might remain.
To get rid of a firewall, use Uninstall from the firewall's menu, or use clean uninstallers from the firewall manufacturer's website. Any attempts to disable, stop service, add/remove etc usually cause problems.




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