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Upgrade of CPU


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#1 tb75252

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 02:07 PM

I have this very old computer that I would like to upgrade just for fun, but I am by no means an expert.

The motherboard is a Tyan Trinity 400 (model # S1854). It has a socket 370 in the FC-PGA package. It currently has a Pentium III 800 MHz installed.
A friend of mine has a used Pentium III 1100 MHz chip but according to this link:
http://www.tyan.com/archive/support/html/c...ii_celeron.html
Tyan does not recommend a Pentium III chip higher than 1000 MHz.

So, what happens if I try to install a Pentium III 1100 MHz?? I guess I could just try and see what happens, but I sure would like to avoid the smell of burnt electronic parts in my house...

Thanks.
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tb

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 03:41 PM

My logic would be the same that I apply to overclocking: The manufacturer tells you "Do this at your own risk" and they mean exactly that.

If you're not prepared to handle that challenge...pay attention to official advisements.

Louis

#3 tb75252

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 04:25 PM

Thanks, Louis.
What do you guys think the worst scenario would be if I attempt to install the CPU? I don't think that the motherboard would fry, right?
--
tb

#4 fairjoeblue

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 05:44 PM

A P3 or celeron 1.1GHz [1100MHz] should be a "Tualatin" CPU.
The Tualatin was the last of the socket 570 & forerunner of the socket 423 Pentium 4 Willamette.

If you piy it on the motherboard & the motherboard doesn't run Tualatin CPU's the worse that will happen is it simply won't come on.
No damage will be done.
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#5 tb75252

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 05:51 PM

Well, the CPU I am talking about is the one described here:
http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Pentium-III/...1100256%29.html

I am not much of an expert, but it would seem that it is described as a Pentium III Coppermine in the FC-PGA package. I could be wrong, though...
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tb

#6 fairjoeblue

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 06:08 PM

OK, It's been so long I forgot they made a Coppermine over 1GHz.

It still won't hurt anything to try it.
The worse that can happen is it simply doesn't start.
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#7 tb75252

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Posted 25 July 2009 - 11:51 AM

I installed the Pentium III 1100 MHz (Coppermine core) and everything seems to be working fine. At boot up, the BIOS correctly reports that I have a Pentium III 1100 MHz installed, that the bus speed is 100 MHz, and that the clock multiplier is 11.

Speaking of clock multiplier: According to the motherboard manual, the maximum multiplier that can be set with the jumpers is 9. Therefore, one must assume that the chip is working with that multiplier, correct?
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tb

#8 fairjoeblue

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Posted 25 July 2009 - 12:40 PM

"the motherboard manual, the maximum multiplier that can be set with the jumpers is 9."

The operative words are "set with the jumpers" .

Your unit is set to automatically detect the CPU so it is using a 11 multiplier since you didn't set it with jumpers.
Had you set it to the max of 9 with the jumpers it would be running at 900MHz since it has a 100MHz bus.

Since it is working you could go in the BIOS & set the bus to 133 & overclock it to 1463MHZ [1.46GHz] :thumbsup:
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#9 tb75252

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Posted 25 July 2009 - 11:41 PM

Apparently, there is no way to change the speed of the FSB to 133 MHz... The BIOS is made by Award (Award Modular BIOS v. 4.51PG) and there is nothing in there that I could find in terms of changing the bus speed. There also is no jumper on the motherboard that I am aware of for that kind of thing.

As a matter of fact, the manual states that the bus speed is autodetermined by the CPU. I guess this Tyan Trinity 400 (model S1854) was not created with overclocking in mind...

So... unless somebody on this board knows of some trick to get around this obstacle, I am afraid I've reached the end of the road!
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tb

#10 fairjoeblue

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Posted 25 July 2009 - 11:53 PM

"Configuration of the S1854 is accomplished through a set of BIOS options and jumpers. The sole function of these jumpers is to set the processor's clock multiplier; a fairly inconsequential detail considering Intel processor's have been ignoring the user-chosen clock multiplier for years. In the BIOS, the "Chipset Features Setup" menu contains a function for adjusting the main bus frequency between to any of the following speeds: 66Mhz, 75Mhz, 83Mhz, 95Mhz, 100Mhz, 112Mhz, 117Mhz, 124Mhz, 133Mhz, 138Mhz, 140Mhz, and 150Mhz"
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#11 tb75252

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 02:34 AM

Thanks for the tip. I did find a function called "CPU Clock/Spread Spectrum" under "Chipset Features Setup". It does have two settings of interest: "133MHz/Off" and "133MHz/On". Either one, when selected, renders the PC unbootable... After a moment of panic, I cleared the CMOS settings via the jumper and now the PC boots up again. The default setting for the "CPU Clock/Spread Spectrum" is "Default" and that allows the PC to boot up.

I did not try to set any other bus speed (such as 112, 117, 124 MHz) because I am afraid to kill the PC and also because I suspect that for things to work out with overclocking there might be another function that needs to be manually set in conjunction with the "CPU Clock/Speed Spectrum" function.

Did you get the information on how to overclock the S1854 on the web? I'd be interested in reading the whole article. Perhaps they go into step-by-step details on how to do it...
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tb




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