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The amazing invisible network connection!


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#1 Ravahan

Ravahan

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Posted 12 July 2009 - 04:54 AM

Hello, thanks for looking. I anticipate this post being rather long...

System:
Microsoft Windows XP
Professional
Version 2002
Service Pack 3

Computer:
AMD Athlon™ Processor
3500+
2.21GHz, 2.00 GB of RAM

To make a long story short, due to a recent power surge taking out equipment I'm on my backup router, which means only three ports. I have two computers and a PS2 which regularly use the internet and a VoIP device which the manufacturer has said is incapable of IP Passthrough or co-existing on the same IP range as another router (it will just reboot itself when it discovers one and change its range by one up or down). After a bit of deliberation, I decided I'd just make use of the extra onboard NIC card by bridging the connection and plugging it in there. This is a very simple thing, I think to myself... And when I open Network Connections, the secondary connection is gone.

The primary card is Marvell Yukon, the secondary is an nForce, they're both bundled on an ASUS board. If its relevant, I can dig up the model numbers. I know with 100% certainty that I had a Local Area Connection icon for this once upon a time. I remember disabling it because I got tired of it informing me that a cable was unplugged.

I can connect through both ethernet jacks, only the Marvell shows in Network Connections, but both show in device manager. The only odd thing about the nForce interface is that it always shows the IP in IPv6 format. The nForce adapter and interface both show up in Netsh, but bridging is disabled. The nForce adapter shows up as a long string of letters and numbers which I suppose is some kind of address that I'm not familiar with. I was unable to rename it with the "netsh interface set interface name" command, though I recieved no error message. I tested and was able to rename the other interface with the same command structure, just to verify I wasn't looney, and then did one purposefully messed up so I could make sure it would give an error if the interface name wasn't right, and it did.

Things I have tried;
-Everything in the MS KB article on the subject found here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/825826
-Disabled both adapters in BIOS and tried enabling them one at a time, nForce adapter first. Both adapters dissapeared, and the nForce adapter would not show a network connection even when it was the only NIC in the device manager
-Reset winsock for good measure
-Reset IPv6 settings in Netsh
-Manually installed the device through the add new hardware wizard
-Tried to bridge through the netsh interface, but the command is disabled. Told me to do it in Network Connections :flowers:
-Updated drivers to the most recent version
-NIC card does not show in any wizards except the "Add New Hardware" wizard when I've uninstalled it.
-System Restore is disabled.
-Computer does not automaticly divine my intentions when I plug the VoIP device into the other adapter and bridge it for me :thumbsup:
-Enabled Wireless AutoConfig service
-sfc /scannow

I tried messing around with the advanced settings in the NIC Device Manager menu, but I honestly don't know what most of them do. On the card with the invisible connection I have the following options and settings currently selected.

Checksum Offload - Enabled
Flow Control - Disabled
Jumbo Frame Payload Size - 1500 (Std frame)
Low Power State Link Speed - Enable
Network Address - Not Present
Optimize For - CPU
Segmentation Offload - Enable
Duplex Settings - Autonegotiation
VLAN & Priority - Disable VLAN&Priority
VLAN ID - 1
Wake on Magic Packet - Enable
Wake on Pattern - Enable
WakeOnLAN From PowerOff - Enable


C _linenums:0'><strong class='bbc'>C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator>ipconfig/all</strong>Windows IP Configuration        Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : amdpc        Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :        Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Unknown        IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No        WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : NoEthernet adapter {033B6DCB-46A1-48AE-88BA-F1B7C368A622}:        Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : NVIDIA nForce Networking Controller- Packet Scheduler Miniport        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-13-D4-D1-AC-E3Ethernet adapter LAN Connection:        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Marvell Yukon 88E8001/8003/8010 PCIGigabit Ethernet Controller        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-13-D4-D1-B4-4F        Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.15.50        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::213:d4ff:fed1:b44f%7        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.15.3        DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 68.87.68.166                                            68.87.74.166                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::1%2                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::2%2                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::3%2Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF        Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::ffff:ffff:fffd%6        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :        NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : DisabledTunnel adapter Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : C0-A8-0F-32        Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::5efe:192.168.15.50%2        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :        DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%2                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::2%2                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::3%2        NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled

The first on this list is the nForce card's invisible interface
C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator>netsh interface show interfaceAdmin State    State          Type             Interface Name-------------------------------------------------------------------------Enabled                       Dedicated        {033B6DCB-46A1-48AE-88BA-F1B7C3A622}Enabled                       Dedicated        Wireless Network Connection 3Enabled                       Dedicated        1394 ConnectionEnabled                       Dedicated        LAN ConnectionEnabled                       Dedicated        Wireless Network ConnectionEnabled                       Internal         InternalEnabled                       Loopback         Loopback

I'm currently hooked into the Marvell card, but the connection works just fine in the other ethernet port. If you guys can think of ANYTHING other than an OS reinstall, I'm happy to try it out. The goal here is to bridge the connection, if there's a way to do that with it invisible then awesome. I know this was lengthy, thanks for reading through. I hope I've included all the relevant information. If you need anything else, let me know please.

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#2 Ravahan

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Posted 13 July 2009 - 04:58 AM

Can anyone think of a way that you could purposefully hide an icon in the Network Connections? Perhaps working in reverse would do it... Or maybe a different way than right-clicking icons to bridge a connection? Any kind of app that might help?

I'd imagine that the icons for those connections are represented somewhere in the registry-- Is anyone knowledgable enough about registry tinkering to give me an idea of how I might try writing a key for it? I did try the keys listed in the KB article, however that wasn't device specific and I imagine that article was written for working with a single card, or a NIC and a modem or something. I did try making a shortcut for the nForce card by putting in what I assume is some kind of device address in the "target" field. Its what was in the shortcut for the Marvell card's connection (except different hex numbers for different devices, of course), so I thought it might work, but it said that the "target could not be found".

I do use Registry Booster 2009, and I wonder if it could've deleted a key for this connection at some point. Its the only thing I can think of that makes sense for why its become invisible, though I know sometimes logic doesn't apply to computers.

I'm sure this is fixable, just gotta figure out the right thing to do here. I wish I were more knowledgable with the registry :thumbsup:




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