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Computer Keeps Restarting after a certain time frame


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#1 mekap04

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 05:25 PM

I am having problems with my computer restarting out of nowhere. Sometimes when it restarts, it goes all the way through but sometimes it gets stuck and doesn't restart but the power light is still on. I just recently took it in to get repaired and they put in a new power supply. everything was working until that happened. Afterwards, it started with the random reboots/shutdown. Sometimes it would last for 5 minutes before it reboot and sometimes after about 4 hours, it would reboot so its random. could anyone possibly tell me what could cause this. I sent my computer back to the shop to check and they said it ran for them the whole time it was there. Keep in mind I only brought the box/harddrive part of the computer (the main thing). No other cables or parts.

Other info

i checked for dust and cleaned
i also switched outlets to see if it was the outlets
i ran my antivirus and nothing was there

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#2 MilesAhead

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 05:40 PM

Find a tutorial how to check error logs in XP. See if you get any clues. If the system doesn't hard lock, but just reboots, chances are something is causing an error(on non-recoverable error the system will reboot automatically.) I would also do some memory diagnostics. You may have errors that won't hard lock the machine, but if the memory is erratic then it may trigger some checksum to tell the machine data is hosed so it reboots(some parity error or some crap.)

Chances are if the dudes doing the work on the machine put in a defective part, you would hard lock. But it's tough to say. Maybe they messed up some BIOS setting or something.

Edited by MilesAhead, 04 July 2009 - 05:41 PM.

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#3 mekap04

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 05:43 PM

Find a tutorial how to check error logs in XP. See if you get any clues. If the system doesn't hard lock, but just reboots, chances are something is causing an error(on non-recoverable error the system will reboot automatically.) I would also do some memory diagnostics. You may have errors that won't hard lock the machine, but if the memory is erratic then it may trigger some checksum to tell the machine data is hosed so it reboots(some parity error or some crap.)

Chances are if the dudes doing the work on the machine put in a defective part, you would hard lock. But it's tough to say. Maybe they messed up some BIOS setting or something.

Hmm, when i checked with the sis sandra software, it did say that my bios may be inaccurate, What I don't understand is the guy that put in the power supply said that it ran for them when they checked it again and it didn't reboot on them. That's why I am so confused. I did have some errors when I checked the system log but I don't understand them. Should I post them?

#4 hamluis

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 07:28 PM

<>

Well...I would not consider SSS as a reliable diagnostic tool, since many of the situations they report to users...are predicated on some mythical average of the systems which have previously used SSS.

A working BIOS is a good BIOS :thumbsup:.

The errors (not informational items, not warnings) that exist on the System tab of Event Viewer...can you post all details of the last 3?

You can double-click on the line item to see the detail for any line item in EV.

How To Use Event Viewer - http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/40108/how-to-use-event-viewer/

Louis

#5 mekap04

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 09:22 PM

<>

Well...I would not consider SSS as a reliable diagnostic tool, since many of the situations they report to users...are predicated on some mythical average of the systems which have previously used SSS.

A working BIOS is a good BIOS :thumbsup:.

The errors (not informational items, not warnings) that exist on the System tab of Event Viewer...can you post all details of the last 3?

You can double-click on the line item to see the detail for any line item in EV.

How To Use Event Viewer - http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/40108/how-to-use-event-viewer/

Louis

TCP/IP has reached the security limit imposed on the number of concurrent (incomplete) TCP connect attempts.

The TCP/IP stack in Windows XP with Service Pack 2 (SP2) installed limits the number of concurrent, incomplete outbound TCP connection attempts. When the limit is reached, subsequent connection attempts are put in a queue and resolved at a fixed rate so that there are only a limited number of connections in the incomplete state. During normal operation, when programs are connecting to available hosts at valid IP addresses, no limit is imposed on the number of connections in the incomplete state. When the number of incomplete connections exceeds the limit, for example, as a result of programs connecting to IP addresses that are not valid, connection-rate limitations are invoked, and this event is logged.

Establishing connection–rate limitations helps to limit the speed at which malicious programs, such as viruses and worms, spread to uninfected computers. Malicious programs often attempt to reach uninfected computers by opening simultaneous connections to random IP addresses. Most of these random addresses result in failed connections, so a burst of such activity on a computer is a signal that it may have been infected by a malicious program.

Connection-rate limitations may cause certain security tools, such as port scanners, to run more slowly.

The following boot-start or system-start driver(s) failed to load: %1

The specified drivers did not load correctly. The driver might not be in the expected location.

DCOM got error "%%%1" attempting to start the service %2 with arguments "%3" in order to run the server:
%4


The Component Object Model (COM) infrastructure could not start the named Windows NT service.

#6 hamluis

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Posted 05 July 2009 - 10:38 AM

The TCP/IP error is small potatoes.

Did you double-click on the line items for the detail of those other two? I've never seen EV errors noted that way, usually the actual driver is mentioned.

I also don't see the Event ID or Source data for those errors, so you did not post the details I requested.

Louis




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