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Am I being spyed on? nestat -na


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#1 Mozz1234

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 10:59 AM

I was searching the web earlier to see if I could find out if someone is spying on me. Through this web-page I learned about using netstat -na to see if someone is using or viewing my computer. When I run it a screen pops up for a second and then goes away. What can this mean, and what should I do?

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 11:59 AM

How are you trying to use (run) it?

You can use netstat, a command-line tool that displays network connections, from a command prompt to obtain Local/Foreign Addresses, PID and listening state.
  • netstat /? lists all available parameters that can be used.
  • netstat -a lists all active TCP connections and the TCP and UDP ports on which the computer is listening.
  • netstat -b lists all active TCP connections, Foreign Address, State and process ID (PID) for each connection.
  • netstat -n lists active TCP connections. Addresses and port numbers are expressed numerically and no attempt is made to determine names.
  • netstat -o lists active TCP connections and includes the process ID (PID) for each connection. You can find the application based on the PID on the Processes tab in Windows Task Manager. This parameter can be combined with -a, -n, and -p (example: netstat -ano).

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#3 Mozz1234

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 12:08 PM

I use it in the Run box, I click start > Run > write in the command click OK and then a box flashes across the screen, but to fast for me to read, then it is gone.

#4 Mozz1234

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 12:09 PM

If I run MSconfig the box with the info. about that stays open.

Edited by Mozz1234, 30 June 2009 - 12:10 PM.


#5 quietman7

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 12:17 PM

Use if from a command prompt.
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#6 Mozz1234

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 12:27 PM

That worked. :thumbsup:

I see a few things pop up, even when I closed all my internet connections. How do I know if I'm being spied on, and if I am what can I do?

#7 quietman7

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 12:34 PM

You have to investigate and monitor your Firewall activity, network traffic, ports, etc. If you don't know much abou Firewalls, read Understanding and Using Firewalls.

There are third party utilities that will allow you to manage, block, and view detailed listings of all TCP and UDP endpoints on your system, including local/remote addresses, state of TCP connections and the process that opened the port:
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#8 groovicus

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 01:59 PM

As a cautionary tale, before you decide to go about blocking ports and such, ask first. Would be a shame if you suddenly lost connectivity.




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