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Should most, if not all mother boards be able to us 56k driver?


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#1 CalusBlade

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 02:53 PM

I am leaning towards buying a new computer. I picked out a computer (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883103197) and this one comes with 56k. but my cousins says I can get a better computer for the same price, hes just not sure if it has a 56k slot. When I do buy it, will it come pre-made? What I mean is, the mother board is already inside the Skin or what ever you call it. The CD/DVD/Floppy drives, hard drivers and any other drivers already have the wires plugged in (the power supply). All I really know how to do is slide in the 56k(if its needed), sound card (if its needed), and video card. If not, I'm sure they come with instructions. How hard is it to understand? Will they come with tags, telling me to connect to what? Also, where is the fan specs?

I rather not blow up a new computer I just bough.

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Oh and some may have seen the other post similar to this. My budget for a computer dropped due to the risk in tuition. I believe it was 700, now its about 400-500. I rather keep it as low as possible. Also, is warranty worth it? Most people say warranty is never really worth it.

Edited by CalusBlade, 23 June 2009 - 03:20 PM.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 03:46 PM

It all depends on where you buy the system...as opposed to buying components or what is called a barebones system...regarding the question of assembly and ease of use.

For the average user, not interested in assembling/connecting anything on a system (other than a power cord, a mouse, a keyboard, and a monitor)...a system purchased will come with an operating system installed, all drivers installed...ready to run right out of the boxes.

A modem, which is the device requiring a possible "56k driver", is totally unnecessary on any system that connects to the Internet using cable or DSL. A modem exists for the connection required to a telephone line (how the modem transmits/receives data).

There are many vendors that sell systems such as I have described. Newegg is among them but...that's not their bread-and-butter...so I would not buy a computer system from Newegg, based on the premise that I can get better value for my dollars...from someone who sells lots of computers to persons just like me (just want it to work).

I've been doing a lot of comparisons on such over the last 4 days or so...I intend to send my brother a system and he's 850 miles away, so I won't assemble it and personally deliver it.

What I find is that Walmart and Dell seem to offer these kinds of systems at the lowest prices (and with Windows XP)...but the user must accept the fact that these types of systems are going to be prepackaged with software/features that the user might not necessarily want.

I just took a look at the system you specified...and the price looks pretty good, in my world. But...that price doesn't include shipping ($20-30 dollars at some vendors, more at others) nor does it include possible sales tax. I just did a quick "checkout" and I would pay $25 for shipping to my location in central TX, while I would not pay sales taxes. With my $10 discount, that system would cost me $415.

Without a monitor.

It also comes with Vista Home Premium...when Vista is about to recede into the past and Microsoft has a new Windows version which will be released with 6 months (best guess). For users who are used to XP, there seems little point in becoming used to Vista...unless a user just happens to like Vista the same way that I like XP. So, I opt to look for a system with XP (either version) installed, for my lazy brother :blink:.

The best package deals (monitor, system) I found were

Dell Inspiron 531 (with 17" monitor), $508 total. With XP, not Vista. Dell thinks their 17" monitors are worth $160.

Compaq CQ2103WM-B Desktop w/ Intel Atom Processor PC with HP 17" LCD Monitor Bundle. $398 list, no shipping fees, sales tax, total of $431. XP Home.

Sooo...I'll probably go with the Compaq/Walmart. That's how I decide these things.

If this system was for me...or if I lived in close proximity to my brother...I'd just buy a barebones system or build one and use one of my XP licenses (I have about 10 legal licenses in my name) and install software which I think he'll need.

Happy hunting :wacko:.

Louis

Edited by hamluis, 23 June 2009 - 05:10 PM.


#3 CalusBlade

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 10:14 PM

But what about how if is when you get it? Is it already wired up or you need to do it yourself? Does it have instructions? As I said I rather not blow up a new computer. Also I do game form time to time. I tend to multitask in those "wait style games" sometime like gunbound or shattered galaxy. Just sit there and wait your turn, when its not study notes, read chapters, etc. . .and yes me with helps me study. . .strangely. . .

#4 hamluis

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Posted 24 June 2009 - 11:44 AM

A system in a box...generally comes with 3 components: the system, the keyboard, the mouse, the power cord.

A user must connect the keyboard and mouse to the computer, following the directions provided (extremely easy, unless you are color-blind).

A user mist connect the monitor to the motherboard...there's only one connector on the back of the system that can possibly work.

A user must connect the power cord to the system and electrical outlet.

Then push the button on the monitor to give it power...push the power button on the systme...Windows boots and appears onscreen.

Instructions are provided with the unit, as well as an owner's manual (which should be put in a safe place and...read before attempting anything with the computer.

Louis




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