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moving old hard disk to new desktop


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#1 ardyess

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Posted 21 June 2009 - 10:10 PM

I believe that my motherboard crashed in my old desktop, so I bought myself another desktop. They both operate on Windows XP. Of course my old desktop had been password protected upon entering windows, and I set up the new desktop with the same ID and password. I placed the old hard disk drive into the new desktop, and the new desktop easily recognized the old disk, and the old disk became the E drive in the new desktop. Some of my programs are easily accessible in the new desktop, however, when I try to open some documents, (especially those in My Documents, etc.), I get a message that says I donít have access to these and they are protected.
Any ideas as to how I can inexpensively access my files on the old hard disk and do away with the password protection that existed on the old drive? Any assistance is appreciated. :thumbsup:

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#2 Andrew

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 05:19 AM

Hey there ardyess, welcome to BC! :thumbsup:

You probably just need to take ownership of the files: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308421

Edited by Amazing Andrew, 22 June 2009 - 05:20 AM.


#3 hamluis

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 09:52 AM

FWIW: The password protection on the old drive...has no impact.

As AA suggested, you need to take ownership of the files which are currently in My Docs on the old drive...then just move them to wherever you want.

This is a routine situation, applying to situations just like yours.

Louis

#4 fairjoeblue

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 10:06 AM

I thought it is against the BC rules to supply info on how to circumvent ANY security ?

Telling somebody how to access password protected files is circumventing security. correct ?

When I post how to go around a password I get emails telling me I'm breaking the rules & to quit it.
Does BC have a double standard ?

[fixed a typo]

Edited by fairjoeblue, 22 June 2009 - 10:07 AM.

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#5 hamluis

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 10:20 AM

I think you misunderstand.

The old drive is password-protected, actually it's the boot access to the drive which is password-protected...which is of no import at all unless it's the boot partition/drive.

There is no way to password-protect a hard drive (all files) that I know of (other than possible encryption)...unless that drive is the boot partition/drive. Any user can take a boot drive and make it a secondary/tertiary, etc. drive. XP assigns it a new drive letter, sees it as another drive with bootable characteristics. It matters not to XP or anyone else...if any drive other than the boot drive...is bootable...so files are accessible.

As I stated...typically, users who try to access files from a system where the boot drive is NOT used as a boot drive...can do so, with the exception of the My Documents group of folders (and maybe Docs & Settings). This is a normal function of XP, MS came up with the "taking ownership" concept...to void user frustration when encountering this.

Louis

Edited by hamluis, 22 June 2009 - 04:01 PM.


#6 fairjoeblue

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 12:14 PM

I don't missunderstand at all .

You have a person that wants to lnow how to circumvent security to gain access to files .

You told them how to do that.


"The old drive is password-protected, actually it's the boot access to the drive which password-protected...which is of no import at all unless it's the boot partition/drive."

If a person installs a "old" HD as a slave & can't access files or folders on it because they are PASSWORD PROTECTED & you tell the person how to access the files/folders you are telling them how to circumvent security any way you slice it.

I am not accusing the OP of anything , nor am I insinuating anything.
The simple fact is a person could have a stolen unit, put the HD in thiers as a slave, & ask how to access the password protected files/folders .

There is no way around that telling somebody how to access password protected files/folders is telling them how to circumvent security.
Saying it's OK because the person said it's there old HD doesn't make it OK.

I'm not going to be chewed out for telling somebody how to go around a password & then hear it's OK when somebody else does it.
If a rule is for 1 it should be for all.
Exceptions shouldn't be allowed , period .

Edited by fairjoeblue, 22 June 2009 - 12:21 PM.

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#7 Andrew

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 12:46 PM

This is not a case of bypassing a password. NTFS uses Access Control Lists to define which users are permitted to access a particular file or folder and what level of access such a user has. These ACL's are based on a unique numeric identifier rather than on the alphanumeric username. Thus, even when using the same username one is still prevented from accessing the files.

The process of taking ownership does not bypass any passwords or additional protections. If a file or folder is encrypted, either through the built-in NTFS encryption or a third party tool, then taking ownership will not remove said encryption.

ACL's are NOT intended as a security measure in the sense of protecting a file or folder from nefarious or unauthorized access at all times in any circumstances. ACL's are intended to prevent the accidental or intentional damage to critical files in a live system. The default ACL's on the Documents and Settings folder prevents a user from accidentally deleting all the contents therein, affecting not only their documents and settings but those of every user of the computer.

Instructing someone on how to take ownership of a file or folder is by no means a breach of Bleeping Computer's policies, nor is there a double standard in the enforcement thereof. This procedure is little different from telling a Linux user to run chmod 777 on a file. It is publicly documented information, published by the designer of the system for the use of all users.

#8 ardyess

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 01:04 PM

Hello everyone,

Thanks for the welcome

Amazing Andrew, hamluis and fairjoeblue, thanks for your responses. I did not mean to cause a stir about password protect. Itís quite possible that I misstated the nature of the problem. I had assumed that it was a question of overriding a password. Actually, a couple of friends of mine whom I consider quite knowledgeable about computers mentioned the password protect and all sorts of complicated and expensive solutions to this situation.

I work at home and have only my computer with an internet connection to the rest of the world. I do writing and research to earn $$$, and obviously there is lots and lots of data on my old hard drive. And what drove me nuts was that some programs, e.g. I use Lotus, and loaded Lotus into the new computer - and all of the old Lotus files were readily accessible.

And since I am the administrator the new computer, and in possession of the old hard drive, I would assume that I have ownership of all of the files. I'm hoping there are no violations of any sort with my situation.

Anyway, I clicked on to the above link, followed the instructions, and viola!! I NOW HAVE ACCESS TO MY FILES!!

I ready to go dancing in the streets.


Many many thanks for your help. This was just so easy when you know where to look.

#9 Andrew

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 01:15 PM

Hello everyone,

Hi!

Thanks for the welcome

Your welcome :flowers:

I did not mean to cause a stir about password protect.

We live on turmoil. At least I do.

It's quite possible that I misstated the nature of the problem.

Yes, but that's what we're here for! If you knew the nature of the problem to begin with, you probably wouldn't have needed our help, and I would be here talking to myself!

And since I am the administrator the new computer, and in possession of the old hard drive, I would assume that I have ownership of all of the files. I'm hoping there are no violations of any sort with my situation.

Not true. There are files and folders which, by default, even the Administrator doesn't not posses. This is a Good Thing, so don't fuss too much. :thumbsup:

Anyway, I clicked on to the above link, followed the instructions, and viola!! I NOW HAVE ACCESS TO MY FILES!!

Yay!

I ready to go dancing in the streets.

I shall dance as well, if you don't mind.

Many many thanks for your help. This was just so easy when you know where to look.

It has been said that the greatest knowledge there is is to know where to look.

#10 fairjoeblue

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 01:31 PM

ardyess, Your're not causing a stir, I am.

There seems to be a double standard going here with other users trying to justify ignoring a forum rule.
They have posted how to access files/folders on a HD that was password protected & seem to think it's ok simply because the drive was installed as a slave instead of being booted.

Telling a person how to "take possession" of files to access them on a password protected HD is telling someone how to circumvent security no matter how the others try to justify it.

I rescue enough files/folders off of HD's to know that unless the OS [Windows] is password protected anything on it can be accessed without having to circumvent the security.

I fail to comprehend how going around a password on a drive installed as a slave to access files/folders is any different then telling somebody how to go around a password to start windows & access the very same files/folders.
Either way it is telling somebody how to circumvent security which is against the rules.

Edited by fairjoeblue, 22 June 2009 - 01:34 PM.

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#11 harrythook

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 02:58 PM

There seems to be a double standard going here with other users trying to justify ignoring a forum rule.

I really don't understand where you get double standard from. There are standards in place for our visitors, and there are standards in place for our senior staff. If you believe that both apply to you, your sadly mistaken.

Telling a person how to "take possession" of files to access them on a password protected HD is telling someone how to circumvent security no matter how the others try to justify it.

There is a large difference from someone recovering files from their personal property, rather than "stealing" information from a drive that was acquired by unlawful means. Although you may believe that the information posted was against the TOS here, the method used is available in a MS paper and available to anybody on the web. In Amazing Andrew's opinion the information was valid to post in this circumstance, and I would stand behind that decision.

I fail to comprehend how going around a password on a drive installed as a slave to access files/folders is any different then telling somebody how to go around a password to start windows & access the very same files/folders.

Look at the scenario. If you want to help someone crack a system its against the rules. Helping someone recover data/programs from a failed system is not.
In reality, if a person has the desire and knowledge to be able to steal a HD, install it in another system and then attempt to recover information from it do you really think they would be posting for advice in here? We have amateurs ask all the time about circumventing security measures, and the moderators are trained in detecting this. If it is deemed to be fraudulent, the posts are removed.

ardyess, if your issue is resolved I will close this thread.
fairjoeblue, if you need further clarification on this I will be more than happy to help you out.

Harry

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#12 ardyess

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 04:07 PM

thank you everyone, the problem is solved.

If I may add, I am the legal possessor of all of the stuff here, and all I wanted to recover is the files that I generated.

With that said, this file may be closed. Problem solved, simple and easy

#13 Andrew

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 04:11 PM

Good to hear.

Closed per harrythook




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