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wrong path or false positive, spybot s&d system internal


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#1 theinvulnerable

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 05:09 AM

Please help me to fix this entry, what should i do, ignore or delete?
As you can see, it tells that cmmgr32.exe is on wrong path? Then, where should it be? When i query this on my computer, i found it in C:\WINDOWS\system32. It is cmmgr32 a question mark icon and it is Help File.

And what about table30.exe? I can't find it in my pc, even if i search including in hidden files and folders.





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#2 joseibarra

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 08:21 AM

When you install/uninstall programs sometimes the process will leave behind traces in the registry that they really probably should not.

The fact that you can't find the files bears this out - the entry Spybot found is in the registry pointing to a file/path that does not exist.

Adobe products are a big culprit, and setup.exe and table30 are a couple from Adobe. Well, setup.exe is pretty general, but Adobe will often leave it in the registry.

The CLSID (all those letters and numbers) with your msiexec and the additional detailed information from Spybot also point to Adobe products, right?. The installation of some Adobe thing left those entries behind, the installation failed leaving them behind, they were not uninstalled cleanly, etc.

I am not 100% on the cmmgr32.exe. It is not on my computers here and reading says it is a Microsoft Connection Manager that may be used for dialup connections or something... Whatever it is, the folder or path associated with it in your registry is pointing to something that probably does not exist (can you find cmmgr32.exe on your system?).

I have let Spybot clean these up before with no problem. They aren't going to be able to do anything anyway if they are pointing off into space somewhere.

My vote - if excellent hygiene is a goal, let Spybot take care of it.

The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates.


#3 theinvulnerable

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 09:21 AM

When you install/uninstall programs sometimes the process will leave behind traces in the registry that they really probably should not.

The fact that you can't find the files bears this out - the entry Spybot found is in the registry pointing to a file/path that does not exist.

Adobe products are a big culprit, and setup.exe and table30 are a couple from Adobe. Well, setup.exe is pretty general, but Adobe will often leave it in the registry.

The CLSID (all those letters and numbers) with your msiexec and the additional detailed information from Spybot also point to Adobe products, right?. The installation of some Adobe thing left those entries behind, the installation failed leaving them behind, they were not uninstalled cleanly, etc.

I am not 100% on the cmmgr32.exe. It is not on my computers here and reading says it is a Microsoft Connection Manager that may be used for dialup connections or something... Whatever it is, the folder or path associated with it in your registry is pointing to something that probably does not exist (can you find cmmgr32.exe on your system?).

I have let Spybot clean these up before with no problem. They aren't going to be able to do anything anyway if they are pointing off into space somewhere.

My vote - if excellent hygiene is a goal, let Spybot take care of it.


I found cmmgr32 in C:\WINDOWS\system32. And i don't know if it is executable file, but when i looked at it on properties of this file. It is described as follows:
Type of file: Help File
Open with: Windows Winhlp32 Stub

And your right i have many adobe product installed right now. And one time i uninstalled some of this product and re-installed again. Because I want to get the most updated or latest product of adobe products. And another reason is when i deleted the useraccount that installing or the first owner useraccount of some of this adobe product, because of unstability issues in all of my icons in desktop and start menu entry was no more GUI. So i was forced to delete it, then i configured my other admin user account to get the ownership of all the file of in C:\Program Files to make some other installed program work.

And what do you mean let the spybot s&d clean these up? Did you mean should i delete those entries? Because there is three option can do on that. No.1 is delete, no.2 is to ignore and the last is to move on new path.

Please kindly clarify... thanks.

#4 joseibarra

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 09:40 AM

I think you found the cmmgr32.hlp file - which is indeed a (boring) help file, and if you read it it deals with dial up connections, and you have not executable to go with it.

Your Spybot is talking about cmmgr32.exe which is an executable file referenced in your registry and there is no cmmgr32.exe executable file on your system, so let Spybot delete it.

I would let Spybot delete the other Adobe residue things also.

The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates.





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