Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

What went wrong?


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 funnytim

funnytim

  • Members
  • 624 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:11:54 AM

Posted 22 May 2009 - 12:48 AM

Hi everyone,

So a while back (maybe a year or so ago?) I was doing some upgrading to my old PC. Its specs & hardware are:

ECS K7SEM Motherboard (socket 462)
AMD Athlon XP 1600+
384MB SDRAM
WD 40GB HD
ATI Radeon 9550 AGP video card
US Robotics 56K dialup modem
Integrated LAN
DVD/CD writer.

Running Windows XP.

My friend gave me his old 512MB SDRam , pulled from his working computer. After checking to make sure they were compatible (ie. both SDRam, and the same pin # (i think pin 168?)), I closed everything and started up the computer.

Then, everything went wrong. The computer refused to boot, with what I remembered with a Black Screen. Taking out the extra ram I added (and thus reverting back to previous state) didn't help at all.After pulling a dial-up modem from the system, the computer booted up and I was able to go into the OS and log in, etc. However, the problems weren't over there as the computer still had random freezing and locking, forcing me to do a hard reboot.
After some troubleshooting, which included reinstalling the OS, testing the HD, and changing the PSU, my friend (another one) was able to get a same compatible AMD CPU (socket 462, don't know the exact model), and after putting that onto the system, it has so far been working OK. So this seems to indicate that it was the CPU's fault? The PSU's readings also indicated it was going.

I have since put in back the dial-up modem into the very same computer, and it seems to work fine. However, I have not tested the ram that I originally tried to add to it.


Even though this problem has more or less been solved, after a year I still don't quite know: What exactly went wrong? Adding ram shouldn't have caused the CPU to have problems. I don't think the PSU would have caused that either, but I'm not sure.

If anyone has any theories as to what may have gone wrong, I'd appreciate it! Please let me know if more details are needed.

Thanks!

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 fairjoeblue

fairjoeblue

  • Members
  • 1,594 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA
  • Local time:01:54 PM

Posted 22 May 2009 - 11:28 AM

If the CPU was going bad the extra memory may have caused the CPU to try to use a part of it that is faulty.
OCZ StealthXstream 700W,Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R , E8500, Arctic Freezer Pro 7, 3GB G.Skill PC8500,Gigabyte Radeon HD 4850 OC [1GB ], Seagate 250GB SATA II X2 in RAID 0, Samsung SATA DVD burner.

#3 funnytim

funnytim
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 624 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:11:54 AM

Posted 22 May 2009 - 01:28 PM

So then it sort of triggered the problem in the CPU to occur, which made it unusable?

Was there anything in the stuff I mentioned above that I might have done wrong, or was it just due to the CPU's age?

#4 fairjoeblue

fairjoeblue

  • Members
  • 1,594 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA
  • Local time:01:54 PM

Posted 22 May 2009 - 03:09 PM

Components don't last forever.
Sometimes they just die a quick painless death & sometimes they just get sick & deteriorate slowly until they finally expire.

The most important thing when removing or installing memory is to unplug the unit & push the on button before you even open the case.
It doesn't take much of a shock to mess up a memory stick.

In your case my theory is that with the original amount of memory the CPU wasn't reaching the upper likimits .
The new memory siplty made it access a faulty transistor in the CPU .

Keep in mind this is my personal theory & I could be totally wrong as to what caused the problem.
I'm operating on expierence & logic only.
OCZ StealthXstream 700W,Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R , E8500, Arctic Freezer Pro 7, 3GB G.Skill PC8500,Gigabyte Radeon HD 4850 OC [1GB ], Seagate 250GB SATA II X2 in RAID 0, Samsung SATA DVD burner.

#5 skiplc

skiplc

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:54 AM

Posted 22 May 2009 - 03:48 PM

Reinstall the old memory and see if the machine boots. I don't see a memory module killing a cpu.

#6 fairjoeblue

fairjoeblue

  • Members
  • 1,594 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA
  • Local time:01:54 PM

Posted 22 May 2009 - 04:02 PM

According to the OP the CPU was havinging issues before the memory was installed.

I actually think it's more of a incorrect memory issue.

As in, If it was ECC memory & the motherboard doesn't support ECC memory.

The only thing that threw me there is that it worked on another unit but the other unit may have a moptherboard that supports it.
OCZ StealthXstream 700W,Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R , E8500, Arctic Freezer Pro 7, 3GB G.Skill PC8500,Gigabyte Radeon HD 4850 OC [1GB ], Seagate 250GB SATA II X2 in RAID 0, Samsung SATA DVD burner.

#7 skiplc

skiplc

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:54 AM

Posted 22 May 2009 - 04:40 PM

Thanks joe, I should've read the op more carefully.

Another problem could be that it's just a K7SEM. I've had problems with that board in the past. Both versions use 3.3v, non-ECC, unbuffered, 512Mb per slot max but his new chip could still be of a higher density than that board will deal with.

His descriptions of removing modem, freezing etc. and finally getting the thing to boot sure ring a bell. I have two in the garage and both will work with a Spitfire core Duron. Neither will work with a classic Athlon, Morgan core Duron, or Palomino core. One will work with a Tbred B and the other won't.

Maddening trying to find out what's really going on with those motherboards.

#8 funnytim

funnytim
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 624 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:11:54 AM

Posted 22 May 2009 - 07:46 PM

The most important thing when removing or installing memory is to unplug the unit & push the on button before you even open the case.
It doesn't take much of a shock to mess up a memory stick.

Sorry, could you expand on what you mean by pushing the on button? A little confused there :S

According to the OP the CPU was havinging issues before the memory was installed.

Sorry, I should have mentioned that the computer was working OK up until I installed the memory (from what I remembered).


As in, If it was ECC memory & the motherboard doesn't support ECC memory.

The only thing that threw me there is that it worked on another unit but the other unit may have a moptherboard that supports it.

Hm...but I would have thought that, while it might do something bad to the motherboard, it wouldn't kill the CPU like that. Unfortunately, I have no way of checking out the previous unit's motherboard, as it has now been donated somewhere.


And one thing that may be of interest...the CPU's clock was showing (in system properties) 1.39GHz prior to installing the memory. Afterward, (when I got the computer to boot up by removing the dialup modem, but still with the apparantely faulty CPU) it showed as 1.05GHz. As I did not set up this computer myself, I would guess that the person who set it up may have OC'd it a little? Not sure if that may have played a factor in this (besides the fact that OC may lessen a CPU's life).

Thanks again!

#9 skiplc

skiplc

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:54 AM

Posted 22 May 2009 - 08:38 PM

A 1600+ runs at 10.5x133Mhz. 1.05Ghz would indicate bios settings of 10.5x100Mhz. Somewhere during all this swapping of parts, the bios was reset to defaults. This should only happen if jumper JP-1 is moved or the motherboard battery removed.

That stick of 512Mb memory have any numbers on it?

"I have no way of checking out the previous unit's motherboard..."

Doesn't matter unless it was the exact same board as yours.

#10 fairjoeblue

fairjoeblue

  • Members
  • 1,594 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA
  • Local time:01:54 PM

Posted 22 May 2009 - 10:17 PM

"Sorry, could you expand on what you mean by pushing the on button?"

Most computers store a small amount of electricity after they are unplugged.
Pushing the on button after a computer is unplugged depleats any stored electricity.
It's just a safety precaution.

[If you have a computer open & plugged in unplug it & push the on button while watching the CPU fan.
You will usually see it try to spin as the stored electricity is used.

A tip on memory sticks.
Non ECC memory is the most common for PC's.
ECC is usually used in "servers" .

Count the total number of chips on a memory stick.
If the total is even it is non ECC
If the total is odd it is ECC
[The odd chip is for the Error Correcyion Code]
OCZ StealthXstream 700W,Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R , E8500, Arctic Freezer Pro 7, 3GB G.Skill PC8500,Gigabyte Radeon HD 4850 OC [1GB ], Seagate 250GB SATA II X2 in RAID 0, Samsung SATA DVD burner.

#11 funnytim

funnytim
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 624 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:11:54 AM

Posted 23 May 2009 - 02:09 AM

Thanks for the info...I didn't know that!!

I'm going to have to dig around in the closet to find that ram. However I will be leaving on a short trip tomorrow, so I will get back to you guys in a few days.

Thanks!

#12 funnytim

funnytim
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 624 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:11:54 AM

Posted 26 May 2009 - 09:01 PM

A 1600+ runs at 10.5x133Mhz. 1.05Ghz would indicate bios settings of 10.5x100Mhz. Somewhere during all this swapping of parts, the bios was reset to defaults. This should only happen if jumper JP-1 is moved or the motherboard battery removed.

Now that you mention it...I did have to replace the CMOS battery during that time...I guess it must've died at the same time?

That stick of 512Mb memory have any numbers on it?


Good news, I found it! First, a correction. It's actually a 256MB stick, not a 512.

And I even have the label for the ram still intact! It says "Micron PC133 256MB SDRAM 168pin CAS3".

Count the total number of chips on a memory stick.
If the total is even it is non ECC
If the total is odd it is ECC
[The odd chip is for the Error Correcyion Code]

Are the chips the black rectangles on it? If so, I counted 8, meaning non ECC.


Thanks!

#13 funnytim

funnytim
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 624 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:11:54 AM

Posted 03 June 2009 - 10:36 PM

Bump? :thumbsup:




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users