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Someone keeps accessing my wireless


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7 replies to this topic

#1 theeboredone

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 11:26 AM

Hello all, I come with a very dire problem. For God knows what reason, someone has always managed to access our family's wireless. I don't know why, considering I have a firewall, an extremely complicated password, and static IPs/DNS addresses, and you cannot access the wireless without those. With that being said, could someone potentially explain how someone could access our network? This has happened multiple times, and I'm almost positive it's from the same person, as we've changed our IP information each time. The only solution I would have would to decrease the range on the wireless, as I don't have any more methods of security without all of them overlapping on each other and creating a problem in itself. Thanks for any advice/tips.

And one more quick question: could this potentially be caused by a virus/keylogger/whatever? I'll send in HiJacker logs if I have to :thumbsup:.

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#2 RavenPhoenix

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 01:04 PM

welllll, they could be "Aircracking" you, which means they are hacking into your network by sampling packets that are sent out and cracking your password. What password protection are you using? WPA? WPA-2? WPSK?
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#3 theeboredone

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 01:20 PM

Using WPA-2. At this point, I'm just going to consider using MAC filtering to prevent any more problems. Still, it bothers me that someone in this neighborhood could potentially have enough skill and knowledge to do something like this.

#4 RavenPhoenix

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 01:55 PM

Have you tried selecting the passphrase option?

Edited by RavenPhoenix, 20 May 2009 - 01:56 PM.

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#5 dpunisher

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 06:17 AM

Gotta ask.......How do you know someone else is on your network?

How long does it take them to access your network after a key change?

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#6 x43

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 01:25 PM

Try setting up MAC address filtering. ;)
x43

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#7 MadDawg

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 03:53 PM

Using WPA-2. At this point, I'm just going to consider using MAC filtering to prevent any more problems. Still, it bothers me that someone in this neighborhood could potentially have enough skill and knowledge to do something like this.


Highly recommended.

Gotta ask.......How do you know someone else is on your network?


If the attacker is using DHCP, then you can look up the clients list and see if there's an extra entry. If you have a Linksys router, you can use the EasyLink Adviser software to view who's on the LAN. I'm sure there are other ways as well.

Edited by MadDawg, 22 May 2009 - 03:55 PM.

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#8 DaffyKantReed

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 10:21 AM

Using WPA-2. At this point, I'm just going to consider using MAC filtering to prevent any more problems. Still, it bothers me that someone in this neighborhood could potentially have enough skill and knowledge to do something like this.


Enable MAC filtering if you wish, but don't bother disabling ESSID broadcast. (Bypassing MAC address filtering is trivial btw)

Why Non-broadcast Networks are not a Security Feature
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library...26942.aspx#EDAA

Also, limit the number of DHCP addresses assigned by the AP/wireless router.




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