Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

WINDOWS XP


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 nonna

nonna

  • Members
  • 71 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:02:02 AM

Posted 20 May 2009 - 02:37 AM

Hello to All :trumpet:

Can anyone help me with this one please.

I bought my computer near 6 years ago and the company that I bought it from doesn't exit anymore.

I have a few issues with the computer and I tried to go into setup but when I entered there was a red screen asking for a password. I tried every password that I have ever used but to no avail. The only thing I can think of is that it was entered by the company I bought the computer from to ensure nobody fooled around with it while it was under warranty.

My question is: :thumbsup: is there anywhere that I can go on my computer where it will show me any passwords stored?

Much appreciated to anyone who can help me with the query.

Cheers

Nonna

:flowers:

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Stang777

Stang777

    Just Hoping To Help


  • Members
  • 1,821 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:10:32 AM

Posted 20 May 2009 - 02:39 AM

Hi Nonna

Did you try just leaving it blank?

Is this the BIOS you are trying to get into?

If it is, I assume you are following the directions Queen Evie gave in your other thread.

I do not know of anywhere on the computer that this would be stored but there are some free programs that might be able to get that for you although I do not know the names of them. Someone else here probably does though. I am pretty sure that there are programs that will give the passwords for most things, I am just not sure those things include the BIOS.

I have read that if you remove the CMOS battery for several minutes that will delete the BIOS password BUT I am not equiped to advise how to do that. It involves removing the battery from inside your case and I am not one to mess around with things inside the case.

Btw, I am only giving this information because I truly believe this is YOUR computer and you are NOT trying to bypass any security that you do not have the authority to. Bleeping Computer has a rule against any attempt to bypass security measures but I believe in this case, you have a legitimate right to get into the things in this system as it is YOURS, not another persons or company.

Edited by Stang777, 20 May 2009 - 03:01 AM.


#3 nonna

nonna
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 71 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:02:02 AM

Posted 20 May 2009 - 04:48 AM

Hello Stang777 :inlove:

How you doing today. Yes I am trying to do what Queen Evie advised in her post, and no I haven't tried just entering but I will do that.

You can rest assured that I am not trying to bypass any security that I do NOT have the authority to do so. This is my computer. To tell you the honest truth I didn't even realise when I posted that it could have been perceived by anybody in that way :cool:

I think I asked that question because I read somewhere that you can access the passwords that are stored on ones computer. As you know I am having all these problems and I have read literally hundreds of posts and information over the last few days.

I'm actually a little bit :) about the company that I bought the computer from for putting that password screen there and not letting me know. I think they did it to make sure if I had a problem I had to take it back to them and now 6 years later they're not even there for me to do that :trumpet:

So as you can see and understand I have no choice but to try to solve the problem myself. :thumbsup:

Cheers once again for responding to my post, and you make sure you get to bed early tonight :P


Nonna

:flowers:

Edited by nonna, 20 May 2009 - 04:49 AM.


#4 Fat2000

Fat2000

  • Members
  • 55 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairburn, GA
  • Local time:12:32 PM

Posted 23 May 2009 - 12:53 AM

Hi Nonna,

Now is your old computer a custom built machine that you bought from a computer shop near you or is it an old proprietary computer from an old defunct computer manufacturer? There are 2 ways to get rid of a BIOS password assuming that is what you've got there, first way is what Stang777 has stated earlier;

I have read that if you remove the CMOS battery for several minutes that will delete the BIOS password BUT I am not equiped to advise how to do that. It involves removing the battery from inside your case and I am not one to mess around with things inside the case.


The other way is to turn on or off the Dip switch on your motherboard, of course those two processes require that you open your computer case and access the innards in order to get to either of the two. (Battery or Dip Switches). This only assuming that this is a BIOS password that you've got going on there.

As for other passwords there are many ways to get rid or change those particular passwords. Here is a link that can help you with a couple simple solutions in this regards; :flowers:

Removed rule breaking link


So, I hope this is helpful and just keep in mind that you will probably have to hack or open your computer. Have a good day and good luck. :thumbsup:

Edited by The weatherman, 23 May 2009 - 01:27 AM.
See above~TW

"I wear my TUX to LAN parties!"


#5 nonna

nonna
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 71 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:02:02 AM

Posted 23 May 2009 - 01:25 AM

Thankyou Fat2000 for responding,

The computer was bought from a computer shop that has now gone out of business.

I will keep in mind your suggestions and thanks once again for responding.

Cheers

Nonna

#6 bluesjunior

bluesjunior

  • Members
  • 761 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:32 PM

Posted 23 May 2009 - 04:01 AM

I alsp bought a PC from a company who later went bust. I remember having a similar problem getting into BIOS to set the boot sequence for a System reinstall and was asked for a passport my son said try the number 1 and it worked. I don't know if this is some sort of repairman thing but it worked for me and is worth a try. If not good luck with the other suggestions.
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-MA770T-UD3, CPU: AMD Athlon II X3 450 Processor, Memory: OCZ 4GB (2x2GB) DDR3 1333MHz,Graphics: PowerColor HD 5750 1GB GDDR5,
PSU: Corsair 430W CX PSU 4x SATA 1x PCI-E, Hard Drive:Samsung SpinPoint F3 500GB Hard Drive SATAII 7200rpm 16MB Cache.

#7 nonna

nonna
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 71 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:02:02 AM

Posted 23 May 2009 - 08:20 AM

Thanks bluesjunior for responding.


Anything is worth a try, thanks for letting me know, I will try on next startup.

Cheers

Nonna

#8 garmanma

garmanma

    Computer Masochist


  • Members
  • 27,809 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cleveland, Ohio
  • Local time:12:32 PM

Posted 23 May 2009 - 08:26 AM

The other way is to turn on or off the Dip switch on your motherboard,


They quit using DIP switches over 9-10 years ago.
Standard is 3 pins with a 2 pin jumper that is switched out to reset the CMOS
Mark
Posted Image
why won't my laptop work?

Having grandkids is God's way of giving you a 2nd chance because you were too busy working your butt off the 1st time around
Do not send me PMs with problems that should be posted in the forums. Keep it in the forums, so everyone benefits
Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook and Twitter

#9 Fat2000

Fat2000

  • Members
  • 55 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairburn, GA
  • Local time:12:32 PM

Posted 31 May 2009 - 01:48 AM

They quit using DIP switches over 9-10 years ago.
Standard is 3 pins with a 2 pin jumper that is switched out to reset the CMOS

:thumbsup:

You know, you are right but she stated that this is an old computer and I have seen that alot of people are still using some of the old computers out there. I myself have not gotten rid of my old P3 even though I have a new oops wait old Athlon 64 3500+. Now that one has the jumper switches that you mentioned and you are 100% correct when you state that DIP switches are over 9 years ago. I just simply move the jumper to the opposite of the default setting and Voila! the deed is done. Back then when we reset DIP switches it was a very tedious task and I am glad those days are gone. :flowers:

"I wear my TUX to LAN parties!"


#10 joseibarra

joseibarra

  • Members
  • 1,238 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Downstairs
  • Local time:12:32 PM

Posted 31 May 2009 - 05:57 AM

If you are trying to enter "setup" I hope you mean the BIOS setup.

The BIOS is a program that runs from your motherboard before your operating system starts. Once the BIOS is setup, the configuration is stored on the motherboard in CMOS (volatile RAM) memory. Your MB battery will keep this alive for several years.

On most motherboards/BIOS programs, it is possible to password protect access to the BIOS. Most home users would not, but if you bought it from a shop, they are trying to keep you from hurting yourself. They didn't do this to be mean or keep you from doing things, but probably from their experience with other users that fiddled with their BIOS and broke their system.

The red screen is another strong hint - it is not from XP.

The reset/clear CMOS jumper (or switch) will allow you to clear any information that was entered when the BIOS was setup and saved to the CMOS. This especially includes BIOS passwords and is really the only way to clear it if you don't know it. It will clear the CMOS memory some other things might need to be changed and saved later.

You will have to open the computer and determine the method based on the motherboard manufacturer. Usually, there are three pins and two of them are connected with a jumper. It may be labeled on your MB (CLR, CMOS, etc.), so look for three pins sticking straight up with a jumper on twp pins and one pin is bare.

The manual for my MB says to power off (important), move the jumper to the other two pins, wait a couple seconds and then move the jumper back to the normal position and power up. Another way to clear the CMOS is to remove the usually round disk like CMOS battery from your MB and then reinstall it. The battery keeps the CMOS alive.

When you see your red screen or when the system is booting, you might need to note the BIOS and MB manufacturer to go online and get a manual to learn how to reset it. You should get a manual anyway in case there are other settings that need to be changed later once you get in.

Edited by joseibarra, 31 May 2009 - 07:14 PM.

The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates.


#11 Fat2000

Fat2000

  • Members
  • 55 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairburn, GA
  • Local time:12:32 PM

Posted 02 June 2009 - 12:15 AM

If you are trying to enter "setup" I hope you mean the BIOS setup.

The BIOS is a program that runs from your motherboard before your operating system starts. Once the BIOS is setup, the configuration is stored on the motherboard in CMOS (volatile RAM) memory. Your MB battery will keep this alive for several years.

On most motherboards/BIOS programs, it is possible to password protect access to the BIOS. Most home users would not, but if you bought it from a shop, they are trying to keep you from hurting yourself. They didn't do this to be mean or keep you from doing things, but probably from their experience with other users that fiddled with their BIOS and broke their system.

The red screen is another strong hint - it is not from XP.


Jose has a point, I myself am notorious at putting a password into the CMOS so that my kids or wife will not tamper with it. And I also agree on his recomendation below;

When you see your red screen or when the system is booting, you might need to note the BIOS and MB manufacturer to go online and get a manual to learn how to reset it. You should get a manual anyway in case there are other settings that need to be changed later once you get in.


I hope this is helpful for you and I am glad that we can put our heads together on this. Great job guys and thank you. :thumbsup:

"I wear my TUX to LAN parties!"





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users