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Q's I want to find A's for


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#1 VicN

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 09:13 PM

Using a spare hard drive to defragment
Probably the best way to defragment your hard drive, if it is in your budget, is to use a spare hard drive. In order to defrag you would copy all the data off the heavily fragmented drive onto a clean spare drive. You would then delete all data on the fragmented drive, and then restore that data back from the spare drive. This will then copy all the data back to the drive in a clean contiguous manner.

What is "data" ? In other words: I only want to move data, I don't want to delete a Folder? Do I Highlight everything in a folder? Do I watch out for .BAT, .EXE,
.INI? If I'm in this type of folder, am I in the wrong place?

Edit: Moved topic from Tests and Scribbles to the more appropriate forum. ~ Animal

Edited by Animal, 22 April 2009 - 06:25 PM.


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#2 Stofzuiger

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 03:45 AM

Well lets start from the beginning,

Probably the best way to defragment your hard drive, if it is in your budget, is to use a spare hard drive. In order to defrag you would copy all the data off the heavily fragmented drive onto a clean spare drive. You would then delete all data on the fragmented drive, and then restore that data back from the spare drive. This will then copy all the data back to the drive in a clean contiguous manner.

Hm i believe that isnt quite the idea of Defragmentation: the idea of defragmentation is, that you put "fragmented (splitted)" files back together, so your system does not have to search for every bit of a file, in order to use this file. So, as you suggested, you copy everything on a HDD, reformat the HDD, and put everything back on... though if you do this, nothing has changed (other than you losing alot of time).

Also, if there's for example an OS running on the HDD, windows simply wont be able to move these files (as there in use).

One of the best solution on defragmentating, is still closing as much applications as possible (or use Smartclose if necessary), also defragmentate more than once at a time may help :thumbsup:.

Also take a look at this post:

to add to some info - you could use a 3rd party defragger running from a LiveOS... this would defeat the fact windows cant move files its using when it is running itself...

By garyT85 here




What is "data" ? In other words: I only want to move data, I don't want to delete a Folder? Do I Highlight everything in a folder? Do I watch out for .BAT, .EXE,
.INI? If I'm in this type of folder, am I in the wrong place?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_(computing)

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#3 Platypus

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 04:10 AM

You can indeed defragment a drive using this method, it is recommended by Apple for example.

To be effective, absolutely everything you wish to keep you must copy onto the second drive, and reformat the original drive. (A Quick Format is sufficient.) With a new file structure, the drive contents will be copied back from the second drive into contiguous locations, regardless of whether the original files were fragmented.

The technique is not suitable for system partitions. It also places the files on the drive in the order in which they are copied. This may not be the best sequence for performance, and it's an area where the optimization of a defragmenter may be preferable. There are various strategies for optimizing placement of files on a drive, based for example on file type, size, frequency of access etc.

It mightn't be immediately obvious, but if the second drive starts out fresh and empty, the files will be defragmented in the copy process to it. So a double copying process could be avoided by having two drives (in swappable drive caddies if it is a frequent process), and putting the second drive in place of the original each time. This also provides an automatic backup, until the next time the spare drive is given a quick format and again becomes the target to create the defragmented copies.

Edited by Platypus, 27 May 2009 - 04:16 AM.

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#4 Stofzuiger

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 04:33 AM

But... how would this go with the OS, as you cannot copy all files (those from the OS for example), as there in use? And you are still formatting your current HDD?

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#5 Platypus

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 07:16 AM

Yep, as I said, the technique isn't suitable for system drives, just a data drive or partition.
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#6 ranger72

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 05:35 PM

also with this method there may be the issue of eventual file corruption at least with images, which may have been copied too many times, unless present technology has taken that into consideration.

ranger72 :thumbsup:
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#7 OldPhil

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 11:00 PM

A tip I picked up along the way is to use Auslogic's defrag on a weekly basis and the MS defrag monthly it has kept all my machines running well and increased the speed of the MS monthly defrag quite a bit. I do not run big drives, this machine has a 160 in it Auslogic cleans it up in about 15 minutes doing it weekly. The MS time is down from maybe and hour to about 35 minutes, between the two it saves a fair bit of time. MS still does the best job bar none!

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