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megabytes and gigabytes


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#1 abx

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 03:02 PM

Can someone tell me how many megabytes are there in one gigabyte? Thank you very much abx

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#2 JohnWho

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 03:14 PM

Some will say 1000

and somw will say 1024.


I'm OK with either.


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#3 Elise

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 03:17 PM

Your computer will say that 1 Gb is 1024 Mb.
We merely humans tend to dispute this, because one might conclude that the difference between mega and giga is three zero's and so 1 Gb would be 1000 Mb.

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#4 fairjoeblue

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 03:25 PM

If you are a hard drive manufacturer 1,000MB = 1GB .
That's why your hard drive "loses" capacity when it is formatted.

If you are a person that actually understands the measurements 1,024MB = 1GB .
[Which is actually correct]

Edited by fairjoeblue, 18 April 2009 - 03:29 PM.

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#5 Romeo29

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 05:50 PM

In binary computing world we count in powers of two, 2n where n can be any integer starting from 0

1 kiloByte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes

1 MegaByte = 220 bytes = 1,048,576 bytes

1 GigaByte = 230 bytes = 1,073,741,824 bytes

Using simple mathematics, you can find out that:

1 GB = 210 MB = 1024 MB

People usually get confused by prefixes like kilo, mega, giga commonly used by SI system in which we use powers of 10:
kilo = 103 = 1,000
mega = 106 = 1,000,000
giga = 109 = 1,000,000,000


Edited by Romeo29, 18 April 2009 - 05:56 PM.


#6 Platypus

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 12:40 AM

The industry is increasingly using the terms specifically defined for binary based storage capacities:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_prefix

What used to be called a Gigabyte (2^30 bytes) is a Gibibyte:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibibyte

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