Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Hard drive upgrade


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 newbie in hawaii

newbie in hawaii

  • Members
  • 122 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawaii
  • Local time:07:15 AM

Posted 10 April 2009 - 11:51 AM

I've searched here and in the tutorial section for an answer to my question to no avail, can anyone please help?

Custom built system running Vista Home Premium, 32 bit
I would like to upgrade all 4 existing drives to 72k rpm units, RAID may be an option in the future.
Replacement drives are WD Caviar Black 500 gb units

How do I go about saving all my existing programs and data from my present drives and then transfer this info to the new drives?
Would I need to do this outside of the Windows environment?
I do have the original Vista installation CD if that will be needed

Can anyone refer me to a site or a forum here for step by step instructions on how to do this simply and safely?

Thanks in Advance !
"Ua mau ke ola o ke kai"

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Sterling14

Sterling14

  • Members
  • 1,842 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York
  • Local time:12:15 PM

Posted 10 April 2009 - 03:56 PM

Will you want to keep the same installation of Windows? It will be easier if you can just reinstall it. If you choose not to reinstall it, you will need to make an image of your disc which may be a bit more complicated, unless you really want to keep your installation of Windows. If you reinstall Windows, you will have to reinstall most, if not all, of your programs too.

Now for transferring your files. You can put the new drive(s) in and copy the files over. You'll need to format the new drives first, and you should format them NTFS. Then you should be able to simply copy your files over to the new drive(s).

If you need more help let us know. Now that I reread this post, it's even confusing myself a little. Let me know if you're a confused on a certain part of what I said.
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#3 newbie in hawaii

newbie in hawaii
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 122 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawaii
  • Local time:07:15 AM

Posted 10 April 2009 - 05:18 PM

Thanks for taking the time for answering Sterling
I'd rather not do a re-install of Vista, preferring to transfer data over to the replacement drive.
The replacement drives are WD Caviar 500 mb 72k SATA units which I bought as bulk items from Amazon, therefore they did not come with the software CD's
Earlier I was on the phone with WD support, would you believe that they do not offer Vista 32 bit installation support software yet? I pointed out that Vista has been released for over 2 years now, their response was indifferent, at best !
Originally I was planning to remove all 4 original drives , plug in the replacements, pop in a CD and transfer data over.
I'll figure this out on way or the other, there are other options I can explore
:thumbsup:


Edit: Edited to remove unnecessary quote. ~tg
"Ua mau ke ola o ke kai"

#4 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:01:15 PM

Posted 11 April 2009 - 02:52 PM

You can download the formatting software to format each of your drives for installation from Western Digital. You will want to download the DOS bootable CD. Install all of the drives in the computer and reboot from the cd then format each drive. As for creating an image of the Drive you will need software such as Acronis True Image which you can download a free trial version. You will need to image each drive and copy that image to the new drive. You will have to maintain each of the drive letters and make sure they are the same. Example you have 4 Drives in your current setup when you install the 4 new drives they need to be the same drive letters as your current setup. You will need to copy the image from the old drive to the new drive that is in the SAME location. If the drive letters are different Windows will not be able to locate the program files for the applications installed. If all of your applications are installed on the same drive as the operating system (Usually the C: Drive) then you will only need to make sure when you copy the image of the C: drive that its copied to the new C:drive. The other drives if the only contain Documents, pictures, and music files the drive letter is not as crucial you will only need to tell your applications where the files are now located. Such as microsoft Word for documents, Media Player for music and movies.
Chad Mockensturm 
Network Engineer
Certified CompTia Network +, A +

#5 newbie in hawaii

newbie in hawaii
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 122 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawaii
  • Local time:07:15 AM

Posted 11 April 2009 - 04:49 PM

Thanks Chad for the info, since I will be recycling at least 2 of the 4 original drives as a external, I had bought 2 Antec hard drive enclosures the same time I ordered the new WD's.
So I installed 1 of the new drives (WD Caviar Black 500 mb) into one of the enclosures, down loaded the free version of Macrium Reflect and copied my existing C,D, & E drives onto the new WD.
Now that I've read your post I am going to have to back and rename each drive like how you said, instead of X,Y & Z, as I have named them.
While on the question of drives and Windows I have another problem.
About a year and a half ago I had issues with my installed RAM, consequently I had to reload Vista again, however I did not or was not able to completely dump the original installation.
So now, after booting up, I am presented with a screen which asks me which version of Vista I would like to use, either Vista Home Premium or the 'recovered' version of it. How do I dump the 'recovered' version and eliminate having to specify which version I want to use?
Hope this makes sense to you

Thanks again !
"Ua mau ke ola o ke kai"

#6 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:01:15 PM

Posted 11 April 2009 - 04:54 PM

You will need to determine what the Partition drive letter is for that operating system. Since you likely created another partition when you re-installed vista. Then make sure there isn't anything on the old operating system partition that the new one is using (not likely unless you stored files on there and told the new installation to find them there IE: installed a program and saved it to that Partition) Then Delete it. We have a New tutorial that was written by Amazing Andrew one of our advisers on how to USE Gparted Live. Should you run into trouble finding and dealing with the offending Partition.
Chad Mockensturm 
Network Engineer
Certified CompTia Network +, A +

#7 newbie in hawaii

newbie in hawaii
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 122 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawaii
  • Local time:07:15 AM

Posted 16 April 2009 - 08:17 AM

Thanks again Chad for the information.
I looked at the Gparted tutorial and noticed that it's setup for XP, I am almost certain that the prompts used in this program should also apply to Vista, do you agree?
However I am lost as to how to determine which version of Vista it is that I want to eliminate using this program.
The particular load that I want to dump calls for a logon name of which I have forgotten, knowing this will it help in locating where this load is on my drive?
Perhaps a safer way of determining this is load date? I know that it was loaded after the original.

Comments?
"Ua mau ke ola o ke kai"

#8 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:01:15 PM

Posted 17 April 2009 - 04:36 AM

Both of which would be a good way to determine which partition it is. Just be sure to move anything you want to save off the partition first.
Chad Mockensturm 
Network Engineer
Certified CompTia Network +, A +




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users