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Info Needed! Software supply chain!


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#1 warwickphil

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 05:21 AM

Hi,

I'm newly registered on these forums, and I'm hoping that someone can help me out. I think this is a fairly basic question.

I'm doing a final year university module, and I'm speaking about how the supply chain for IT software has changed in the last few years (ie. companies like Microsoft now allow applications inc. windows to be downloaded direct from their website).

What I'm trying to figure out, though, is what is the traditional supply chain in the software industry?

I figure it's something like:
Programmer > Tester > CD manufacturer > Distributer > Retailer > Consumer

but I'm really just basing that on an assumption. If there is a diagram or something that someone has, then that would be massively useful.

I have obviously spent quite a bit of time googling this, but it is a tricky search due to the amount of 'supply chain management software' on the market!

Thank you for any advice,
Phil



EDIT:Moved to a more appropriate forum (I think)

Edited by garmanma, 05 April 2009 - 09:16 AM.


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#2 jgweed

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 09:55 AM

Strictly speaking, supply chain management software applies to the process of securing merchandise and putting it where it will sell in an speedy and orderly manner through the allocation or replenishment of merchandise. I think what you are asking is more about IT project management (the development of an application from conception to writing code to testing to final release and production) and then how that release is marketed and distributed.
Much like the distribution of games or music (to answer the second part), there is a marked shift from the traditional one of putting the application on disk and selling it in a brick and morter store towards offering the release as an internet download (which has benefits for the consumer as well as the maker). While too early to really tell, there also seems to be a move towards (thanks to cloud computing) users "renting" the application as opposed to actually owning it, but the business process for this is not vary clear.
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#3 warwickphil

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 10:04 AM

Thanks John, you're right, I'm referring to IT project management, as opposed to supply chain management tools which are increasingly being adopted by firms in all industries. Also, I'm aware of cloud computing, and will be discussing this to some extent.

I've managed to ascertain some more information regarding the change in the supply chain, but would like some information on the effect Electronic Software Fulfillment is having on the actual programming companies/teams. Increased profits? Faster response times in certain areas?

Thanks,
Phil.

#4 jgweed

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 10:19 AM

ESF is more a downstream thing. For the most part,if I understand what you are asking, the life-cycle of a project (upstream) has not changed that much, although there are additional tools and analysis methods and procedures available for many of the traditional steps.
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