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Slipstreaming Windows XP To Create a Bootable Windows XP CD


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#1 TutorialBot

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 12:38 PM

A new tutorial titled Slipstreaming Windows XP To Create a Bootable Windows XP CD or DVD was added by Chad Mockensturm (Sneakycyber). Please use this topic to discuss any aspect of this tutorial.

A brief excerpt of the tutorial can be found here:

After a version of Windows is released, over time bugs are found or new enhancements are added by Microsoft. In order to fix these bugs and add these new enhancements, Microsoft will occassionally release a large update called a Windows service pack that contains all of bug fixes, enhancements, and new features created since Windows was released. Unfortunately, CDs that you have for Windows usually do not have these newer Service Packs already installed. This means that if you ever need to reinstall Windows with your CD, you will also have to deal with the timely task of reinstalling the service packs. To make matters worse, some of the fixes in these service packs are security related, and by not having them installed, your computer may be at risk from viruses or vulnerable to hackers. Therefore, not having these service packs installed after you install Windows could open yourself up to big security risks.

In order to resolve these types of issues it is possible to integrate the newer service packs over an an older copy of the Windows installation files. This allows you to install Windows with the service pack already installed so that you do not have to install them after the installation process. This process of integrating the newer service packs with older installation files is called slipstreaming. The goal of this tutorial is to walk you through creating a slipstreamed Windows installation CD or DVD that already contains Windows XP Service Pack 3. That way if you install Windows using this CD/DVD, your installation will already have these large updates installed, your computer will not be in as much danger, and you can just focus on installing the latest updates and the applications that you want on your computer.


We hope you find this tutorial helpful.

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