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Some of the file captions have turned blue


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#1 terrbear

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 06:18 PM

When I open "My Computer" I noticed that the "Local Disk C" is blue, all the others are in black. When I Open up the C drive one out five folders is in blue, the rest are in black. When I open up my other disk drive (G) and open up the "My Pictures" folder about half of the captions under the photos are in blue the rest in black. Everthing works like it should when I open files and folders up that are blue, just not sure how they got the way. Is ther a reason for why they are blue :thumbsup:

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#2 Romeo29

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 08:09 PM

In Windows XP, by default, a compressed folder/item is shown with BLUE font color. Also an encrypted folder/item is shown in GREEN color.

To change compression settings:
Right-click on a folder, select Properties, Click on Adavnced and a dialog would pop-up in which you can set whether you want to compress the folder or you want to encrypt it.

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#3 terrbear

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 08:28 PM

Wow, that was easy. So it's ok to leave them and just compress the larger files?

#4 Romeo29

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 08:46 PM

To execute/access compressed items, Windows consumes more CPU. So compression is not recommended on older or slower systems. Also Microsoft susggests avoiding compression if you have considerable free hard disk space.

#5 terrbear

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 08:53 PM

Thanks for the explanation, I do have an older pc. I'll stay away from compressing files.
Should I uncompress the ones that are commpressed?

#6 Romeo29

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 09:01 PM

If your computer is running fine and you dont see any sluggish behaviour then let it stay as it is. Typically, you would compress files and folders that are accessed not so often like photo collection, backups or even mp3s. And stay away from compressing program and system files which Windows executes so often.

You can do hit-and-trial with this, see if compressing slows your PC down, if yes un-compress, if not enjoy :thumbsup:

#7 terrbear

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 09:08 PM

Will do, thanks for the advice. :thumbsup: :flowers:




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