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Requesting a build.


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#1 ComputerNoob_

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 06:27 PM

Hi everyone, I would like a computer with a budget of 700-750 that is future proof.

Please try and match these specs:
Quad core processor
6-8 gigs ram
An "OK" video card, even a 60 dollar one would do. (I do not plan on SLIing or Crossfiring.)
Vista 64 bit of course
320-500 GB hard drive
Is that possible for my price range? (Please don't choose too expensive of a part like a $100 case please :thumbsup: )

I plan on playing Crysis, and some other games, but I do not need a hard core gaming machine, just a decent computer would do fine.

P.S. I have a monitor, keyboard, and a mouse already. Thank you for helping. :huh:

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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 07:39 PM

I plan on playing Crysis, and some other games, but I do not need a hard core gaming machine.............


Bit of a contradiction there. I don't know of any $60 cards that will run Crysis well and do a quad core justice.

Edited by dpunisher, 19 March 2009 - 07:40 PM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#3 the_patriot11

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 09:57 PM

a build similar to this may be able to do just that.

Gigabyte MA86GUD3 Motherboard (think thats the right one) micro ATX motherboard. about 80 bucks
a decent phenom (2.4-2.6ghz) 100-140 bucks
4 gigs of patriot Viper DDR2 50 bucks before rebate
640 gb samsung Hard drive around 60 bucks
Samsung DVD/RW writer, around 25 bucks
ATI 4670 video card, around 70 bucks
Computer case, around 30-40 bucks
decent Power supply, 600-650 watts (antec, OCZ, corsair, or coolermaster) around 100 bucks
Windows vista premium 64 bit 140 bucks

this comes out at around 700 bucks. It wont provide stellar gaming capabilities, but should be able to handle crysis on around medium settings. the motherboard will not suport crossfire or SLI, but you should be able to upgrade everything else pretty decent in the future if need be.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 01:25 AM

You may not be able to stay within your price range if you're aiming for something that can smoothly run Crysis with higher settings. Here is a suggested configuration.

Case: Sunbeam Transformer IC-TR-US-BA-WOPSU Black Steel ATX Full Tower - You need something to put your components into. A full ATX tower has the depth to accommodate the largest GPU's. $75

Motherboard: ASRock A780GXE/128M AM2+/AM2 AMD 780G ATX AMD Motherboard - A solid board that supports the newest AMD processors. This is a standard ATX board and I don't suggest getting a micro-ATX board due to cooling issues. $80

Video Card: HIS Hightech H487FN512P Radeon HD 4870 512MB - There are a number of options here, but since you're wanting to run Crysis at a reasonable framerate, this card will do. $164 (Before $10 Rebate)

Power Supply: hec X-Power Pro 600 600W - This is a relatively inexpensive PSU that gets good ratings. It also has enough power to use Crossfire or the more energy intensive cards. $50

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 920 2.8GHz - This is one of AMD's newest processors. You will need all the horsepower you can get for Crysis. The Phenom II is more efficient and runs cooler than the original Phenom. $194

RAM: OCZ Fatal1ty Edition 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 1066 - The motherboard needs DDR2-1066 RAM. In order to meet your requested RAM amount, you will need two of these kits. $43 per kit (Before $15 mail-in rebate per kit)

Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Black WD6401AALS 640GB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - I know you said you only needed a 500GB drive, but this one is only about $5 more expensive. $80

Optical Drive: Lite-on combo drive - A simple SATA drive that will read and burn most media. $22

Operating System: Windows Vista Home Premium SP1 64-bit OEM - As per your request. $99

Total Cost: $852 (Includes two RAM kits)
Total Rebates: $40 (Two rebates for two RAM kits.)

Since you're over your budget here are some things you can cut or reduce in power if you choose.

Video Card: The original selection will run Crysis well, but is expensive and requires at least a 500W power supply. You can get the SAPPHIRE 100265HDMI Radeon HD 4830 which is a step down from the 4870 but costs $90 and has a $15 rebate.

Power Supplies: Corsair makes excellent PSU's, but they are expensive. If you want to save some cash, you can get the APEVIA ATX-AS520W-BK 520W for $60 or the Rosewill RP550-2 550W for $50. If you get either of these, you will not be able to use Crossfire with the 4870's and only the Rosewill has enough power to Crossfire the 4830.

CPU: I strongly advise against reducing the CPU to a lesser model. You will need the power in the future and its easier to swap out GPU's than it is CPU's. Nevertheless, if you really want to downgrade there are options. You can downgrade to the AMD Phenom 9850 BLACK EDITION 2.5GHz for $140 if you want to stay with a quad and futureproof. Or, if you want a dual core, the AMD Athlon 64 X2 7750 Kuma 2.7GHz is available for $65.

Of all these options, I say reduce the graphics card down to a 4830 and go for the Rosewill power supply. You may have to dial down the eye candy in Crysis a little, but you'll still have a powerful PC that is more in line with your budget.

Edited by DJBPace07, 20 March 2009 - 01:31 AM.

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#5 the_patriot11

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 01:31 AM

thats a good setup there. Although, in reality micro atx boards only create heating issues when paired with a micro atx case lol.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#6 DJBPace07

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 01:33 AM

Nevertheless, the pricing is the same and having components compressed tightly together in a micro-ATX board can create thermal issues especially with hot chipsets.

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#7 ComputerNoob_

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 07:05 PM

Would this case work: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16811156098
Or this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16811144222 ?
I think I will keep the build you gave exept the PSU/case and use the second video card. Thank you :thumbsup:

BTW, I need a wireless card, are those expensive? The router is not that far away from me so I don't need those expensive ones. Thank you xD

Edit: Can I slim it down 50-100 more with the wireless card? :X

Edited by ComputerNoob_, 20 March 2009 - 07:19 PM.


#8 DJBPace07

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 12:31 AM

Use caution when purchasing mid-tower cases with large graphics cards, there may not be enough room and it is possible you may need to send the case back if you cannot fit the card. Also, many cases that come with power supplies don't have good PSU's, some do however. Some of the reviewers with the Raidmax case say the PSU will choke on even a 9800GTX, let alone a Radeon 4830. The Apevia has the same issue with the power supply and users are reporting problems with cooling the case. In order for a case/PSU combo to be more cost effective than the one in my build, the combo should not cost more than $120. The RAIDMAX SMILODON ATX-612WBP may work for $90, though it could have a better power supply.

Edit: Can I slim it down 50-100 more with the wireless card? :X - I'm a little confused at this remark, if you buy a wireless card, you will be increasing the price.

As for wireless cards, they are generally inexpensive.
D-Link WDA-1320 - I have this one.
LINKSYS WMP54GS

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#9 ComputerNoob_

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 01:54 AM

Is overclocked video card and GGDDR5 good? Sorry but I'm a noob xD http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16814130445

Would that fit in my case and will the case's 500W power supply work? Also isn't the Raidmax case you said the same as this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16811156098 (but it has a slightly different price and color)

Also, because of financial reasons, I'm going to have to slim it down to 650-700, any suggestions to mod it out? Current build:

Mother board: ASRock A780GXE/128M AM2+/AM2 AMD 780G ATX AMD Motherboard

Video Card: SAPPHIRE 100265HDMI Radeon HD 4830

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 920 2.8GHz

RAM: OCZ Fatal1ty Edition 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 1066 X2

Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Black WD6401AALS 640GB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive

Optical Drive: Lite-on combo drive

Operating System: Windows Vista Home Premium SP1 64-bit OEM

Case: RAIDMAX SMILODON ATX-612WBP

Wireless Card: D-Link WDA-1320 (Can this be slimmed down, or is the money worth it, because I think I have seen cheaper at electronic stores xD)

I need to cut out around 100 dollars... What would be the least noticeable performance downgrade?
Also would everything fit in the case, and not blow up? Thank you :thumbsup:

Edit: I also plan on using dual monitor, would that work with the video card?

Edited by ComputerNoob_, 21 March 2009 - 01:58 AM.


#10 DJBPace07

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 02:45 AM

GDDR5 is a faster form of graphics card memory. The 9600GT you selected is nowhere near as good as the 4830, I suggest keeping the 4830. Unfortunately, given your budget situation, you may need to cut down on the processor. The question is how much are you willing to cut. Swapping out a CPU once it is installed, is a little more involved than swapping out video cards but is doable. You can get a dual core CPU (the 7750 Kuma I listed earlier), that is all you really need now anyway, and get the quad core when the price drops or you have more money. Most current games are not designed from the ground up to use a quad, though some are and many upcoming games will make use of all four cores. The cases are different and one has a better mail-in rebate. By downgrading the CPU and going for a case/PSU combo, you should be closer to your budget.

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#11 ComputerNoob_

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 03:26 AM

Would this be ok? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819103249
Is there a really big difference in Phenom I and Phenom II? BTW is the heat sink in Phenom good? xD
Oh, and how are they different? the details look the same. Thanks again. (Oh, and would it be possible to overclock it to 3.0 ghz on that?)

Edited by ComputerNoob_, 21 March 2009 - 03:32 AM.


#12 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 06:09 PM

huge difference, phenom II is a far better core. But if you really want to save money, the 7750 Kuma is a good CPU, I used it in a build for my dad. Its based on the phenom architecture with 3 levels of cache, very fast running dual core will run any of the games on the market today.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#13 DJBPace07

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 06:39 PM

The Phenom II uses a different 45nm core than the regular Phenom. This core is more efficient, cooler, and consumes less energy than the original Phenom. The Kuma is not a bad processor at all and, as patriot said, runs on the same core as the regular Phenom. Given your budget restrictions, the Kuma may be the better option. As for heatsinks, the Phenom II has a slightly better one. If you're planning to overclock, you may want to get an aftermarket heatsink. However, since you're going for a mid-ATX tower case, the really good ones might be too large.

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#14 ComputerNoob_

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 11:04 PM

Ok, I've decided to get a Phenom II 2.8 ghz X4, because there's a march madness for AMD (lol) , theres like combo savings. I got the combo with the video card, so it fits my price range pretty good since it's like 100 dollars off with a video card.

MSI R4830-T2D512 Radeon HD 4830 512MB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready Video Card - Retail

Is this the same as the Sapphire one you gave me? I think I am about to seal the deal. :thumbsup:

Oh, and I heard that Asrock is bad, is that true, and should I get another motherboard instead?

I read the reviews of the case, and it seems like the PSU is bad, but some people said it was good... 500W seems a lot for my build, since I won't be running SLI, Crossfire, or multiple Hard drives... Is it recommended to buy another power supply? I think it's a waste to get a case/PSU and then buy a aftermarket PSU xD.


Edit: Edited to remove unnecessary quote. ~tg

#15 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 11:17 PM

I have never used ASrock myself, but I have read a lot of good reviews and several members here swear by them. I dont use them, because many ASRock boards a bit pricey and I dont like the RAM placement on most of them (on a lot of them they put it above the CPU not beside it, I much prefer having the ram on the side but this is a personal preference) but I would not be afraid to buy one. I typically use gigabyte boards myself. as far as the video card, I would avoid MSI video cards like the plague. especially that one, that heatsink over the GPU looks rather sad and MSI is rather low on the list of ATI chipset manufacturers. this saphire card http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...=saphire%204830 is actually 10 dollars cheaper and comes with combo savings with a saphire power supply if your interested, along with better reviews. Saphire is the number one rated ATI company out there for a reason, I use their cards in all my builds. I would put money on that saphire card being of higher quality and lasting longer then that MSI card, and at 10 dollars less, a much wiser choice.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.





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