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Crime Czar for a day


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#1 groovicus

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Posted 10 June 2005 - 10:04 AM

If you were crime Czar for a day, what would you do to fix the criminal justice system (irrespective of what country you may be in.. they all have problems)

Personally, I would put humiliation back into the process. I get a little tired of criminals who get upset when their crimes are made public. Too bad. I saw this article on http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20050603/od_nm/...kland_dc/nc:757

The city of 400,000 across the bay from San Francisco started putting up billboards on Wednesday showing men arrested for soliciting sex.

[...]Critics say the technique -- which De La Fuente said has been used in Texas -- recalls medieval public humiliations.


Hmmm...not that I would care to see medeival punishments revived, but I think they were on track with the public humiliation part of it. Remember Michael Fay and his public caning in Singapore? Rock on.. Not only are we not going to keep your crime a secret, we're going to whip you in front of all of your friends. Think about that next time you pull the fire alarm on a whim.

It's obvious that tougher sentencing laws are doing nothing but costing the taxpayers more money, clogging prisons, and not really doing anything to stem the tide. And this isn't just an issue in the United States.....

So what would you do?

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#2 Pandy

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Posted 10 June 2005 - 03:52 PM

If I was a crime czar for a day... I would make it a point to find virus writers and publicly humiliate them in some way. I would make it a point to find them and punish them. Making them pay restitution would be very good. Mess up my computer and you can buy me a new one. I think these writers pretty much do as they please and don't really worry about repercussions.

And speaking of school. My kids have had many and frequent bomb threats at their school over this past year. I would take those offenders and publish their stunt on the AP and Rueters LOL
Seriously I would. The problem with that it is usually minors. They are protected. But I think if a minor commits a federal offense then they should be treated like an adult.

I won't even go on about I would have done to sexual offenders. No need to be that strident I think. here on a public forum.

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#3 catweazle

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 11:08 AM

Naming and shaming the offender or criminal may work, it could make them stop and think twice about committing crimes.I'd also like to see the punishment fit the crime, if a criminal gets life that's what he should get, not out in 15 or 20 for good behaviour.

#4 Heretic Monkey

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 04:37 PM

I'm all for public punishment. Back in medieval days, the criminals were locked in the stocks and ridiculed/pelted with food. That seems to be a lot more affective than giving them a prison cell, a stable place to sleep, 3 meals a day, and time to joke/talk to other prisoners.

Either that, or just talk to the dudes over in Japan. I think they have like the lowest crime rate in the world....

#5 efizzer

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Posted 14 June 2005 - 08:26 AM

And the highest population..... weird eh? I agree, i'd learn from China and japan, in one year they may have 10 violent crimes, while we have over 100 (i'm being nice) in one month. Caning sounds good, heck, i'd think twice about committing a crime if i knew i'd get struck in my back with a bamboo cane. I'm all for the Death Penalty for serious crimes, because it costs a lot to keep a killer alive, but a mere fraction for a bullet or a length of rope. Forget the electric chair or lethal injection..... too nice. Chemical castration for sex offenders. Corrupt politicians? I'd give them a special gift. :thumbsup:
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We're going to make the merry-go-round go faster, so everyone needs to hang on tighter-just to keep from being thrown to the wolves.

#6 jgweed

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Posted 14 June 2005 - 08:45 AM

To argue that Oriental societies have less serious crime because of public punishment is to ignore the historically defined values of both societies, in which the individual is less important than the state, or decorous order. The unfortunate mainland Chinese live in a police state, where even the word "democracy" or "freedom" is banned from blogs, and countless individuals have been sacrificed- - - as late as Chairman Mao's "great leap forward" and Tianenmen Square- - - to the collective good.
I certainly hope the civilised world does not revert to the barbarism of public executions, and leaves those to fundamentalist moslem countries, where there, too, is a disregard for the individual and for the fundamental liberties which should be the heritage of every human being.
Regards,
John

Edited by jgweed, 14 June 2005 - 09:41 AM.

Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#7 Heretic Monkey

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Posted 14 June 2005 - 11:50 AM

To argue that Oriental societies have less serious crime because of public punishment is to ignore the historically defined values of both societies, in which the individual is less important than the state, or decorous order. The unfortunate mainland Chinese live in a police state, where even the word "democracy" or "freedom" is banned from blogs, and countless individuals have been sacrificed- - - as late as Chairman Mao's "great leap forward" and Tianenmen Square- - - to the collective good.
I certainly hope the civilised world does not revert to the barbarism of public executions, and leaves those to fundamentalist moslem countries, where there, too, is a disregard for the individual and for the fundamental liberties which should be the heritage of every human being.
Regards,
John

It's not just the history of crime/punishment that still has effects today. Does China still carry out public sentences, or have they moved on to more "popular" throw-a-guy-to-rot-in-a-cell?

Japan isn't a police state society. Aren't they full democratic? They are able to keep the crime rate extremely low, while avoiding public embarrassements and punishments.

#8 jgweed

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Posted 14 June 2005 - 11:57 AM

The point I was trying to make was that the low crime rate in many oriental societies is caused by a tradition of subsuming the individual to the collective and in addition, to the lack of freedom in some (but not all) oriental nations, rather to any crime/punishment actions by authority.
Regards,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#9 lulabelle

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Posted 14 June 2005 - 03:33 PM

Another common feature of societies in which there is a very low crime rate, is that the family unit hasn't disintegrated. In countries such as mine (the UK) it is perfectly acceptable (positively encouraged, some would say) to bring up children as single parents, to divorce on a whim, to leave the state to care for those unwilling to work and also to care for old or infirm family members.

Here there is a whole generation growing up who have no idea of the relationship between work, taxation and welfare. It is now accepted that in the first instance we should look towards the state as the means to support and care for us - be it in sickness, in terms of education, for unemployment benefit - indeed for just about everything. Individual responsibility is no longer an issue. "'They' should help us," I hear over and over again. (I am a teacher and constantly hear teenagers saying that 'they' should be providing x,y and z. When pressed the more articulate manage to turn 'they' into 'the Government')

Living with such expections as these (together with the lack of a true sense of personal responsiblity) it is easy to understand why so many turn to crime when they have no sense of responsiblity to provide for family or be part of a wider community. In a society increasinly obsessed by material wealth the gap continues to widen between the haves and have-nots. Sadly some of the have-nots will take/steal/destroy property which they see as being denied them - even though they have not labored for it.

Depressing eh?




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