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Laptop spontaneously shuts down


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#1 Captain Carrot

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 02:45 PM

I have a five year old laptop running windows XP SP2 that spontaneously shut down in the middle of normal operation yesterday. Subsequent attempts to re-start it resulted in it shutting down at the windows logo. I waited a half-hour or so, tried again, and this time it allowed me to log on for about three minutes before shutting down.

I thought that it might be a hard drive issue, so I tried a non-destructive system restore. (As the manufacturer did not provide me with an XP disk, I had to use the system restore disks that the PC came with) However, halfway through this process, the PC shut itself down again. It took several tries before the machine stayed on long enough for the process to finish, only now the registry for Windows has become corrupted. I could fix this if I could just get the computer to stay on long enough to let me do so!

I haven't noticed any symptoms of a serious problem. My screen has been flickering, but the same problem two years ago turned out to be the result of a faulty back light, so I decided to ignore it in favor of coaxing as much life from the light as I could. My computer has also been running a bit slower lately, but I chalked that up to the fact that I run Photoshop and several other programs simultaneously. Also, I haven't installed any new hardware/software or contracted any viruses recently.

EDIT: Also, since the crash the battery has been in a constant state of recharge despite the fact that I have the machine plugged into AC power. Without the battery, the computer won't start at all. This is the same outlet that I've had the PC plugged into for the last six months, and none of the other items plugged into it (monitor, phone, hard drive, etc) showed any signs of going kaput.

Edited by Captain Carrot, 15 March 2009 - 02:47 PM.


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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 06:43 PM

It could be a heating issue, have you tried putting a fan underneath it and then turning it on to see how long it runs? being 5 years old, Its possible your motherboard is going bad as well, laptops can't cool as well as desktops do, and often over time the motherboards will overheat and fry.

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#3 Captain Carrot

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 09:08 PM

If it is a motherboard issue, would it be more cost effective to get a new laptop rather than trying to fix it? Though I'm loathe to drop 700 bucks on a new machine right now, the fact is that software these days is suck up a lot more resources, and my laptop can no longer compete. Also, is there any way to help prevent this sort of thing in the future? My laptop has always been excessively hot-- I can count on one hand the number of times it actually ever resided in my lap-- but if there's a way to help keep them cool, I'd like to know.

#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 11:07 PM

You could take it in to a computer shop and get an estimate on how much it would cost, but its likely to be expensive. One trick to increase the length of a laptop is to buy those fans for them at wal-mart. you can find them in the electronics section, their flat, about the size and width of a laptop and have cooling fans to cool the bottom of the laptop.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.





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