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Gaming laptop


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#1 narasimhan

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 06:36 AM

hi guys,
i'm planning to buy a gaming laptop. the budget is $1300-1500. Max is $1700. purpose is gaming and some programming,downloading browsing. it must satisfactorily play crysis is medium or if possibly in high graphics mode. screen size could vary but possibly around 17 inch. it should have all other basic facilities. portability is not an issue.
i have already asked for suggestions of a gaming pc in another thread but my friends suggest a laptop. so maybe i am also considering it as my father has increased the budget from $900 to $1500. so please give your suggestions.

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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 06:05 PM

for gaming, I personally believe a laptop is a poor choice, many laptops have the mobile version of hardware installed so they can run cooler, so they cant perform as well as a desktop, and the ones that are optimized for gaming and have the full gamble, will run hotter, and will not last near as long as a desktop. and most of them cost in the area of 2-3000 dollars, and the upgradeability is severely limited. however, if you really want some gaming laptops, for a good intel/nvidia setup (see people, I dont always recomend AMD/ATI) this ASUS one might do you well: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16834220343 this would also be a good choice: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16834220483 if you want a larger screen and ddr3 this beast is nice http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16834114634 but my number one recomendation, and this is if you can talk your dad into spending around 1800 dollars, is this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16834147924. it is one of the few laptops hooked up with a quad core CPU. this is an EXTREME rarity among laptops, due to cooling reasons, and its a very low end quad at that. If you want the most power from a quad core CPU you will have to build a desktop Im afraid. but HP makes excellent quality laptops, this one does have a quad, albiet a low end one, it also has 4 gigs of ram, a 500 gig hard drive, and the nvidia 9600. not the best graphics out there but it will run modern games decently well.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 DJBPace07

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 11:45 PM

Gaming on a laptop is, at best slow. A desktop replacement, or gaming laptop, will be heavy, expensive, slower than a desktop, and go obsolete faster. A desktop is a far more enjoyable experience when running games. Desktop PC's have more powerful and cost-effective hardware. A $1500 desktop will get you a very powerful computer. This Acer laptop has a desktop quad core processor and a dedicated graphics card, but is about $100 beyond your price range.

Edited by DJBPace07, 14 March 2009 - 11:45 PM.

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#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 12:56 AM

I tend to avoid acer laptops, with the exception of their ferrari series, because Acer is notorious for putting in cheap, ball bearing fans over the CPU, and the ball bearings often arnt greased properly and can actually over time overheat and cause problems. Ive seen so many acer laptops with fried motherboards/CPUs because of this. perhaps with a 1600 dollar laptop like this they put in a higher dollar fan, but If it was me I wouldnt risk the money, but thats just my personal opinion. especially since a 1000 dollar desktop will smoke this laptop, or any of the laptops I suggested, and be far more upgradeable for the future.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#5 fairjoeblue

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 02:27 AM

Dell XPS, since Dell bought Alienware the XPS is a "rebranded" Alienware.
It is available with an actual nvidia video card.
I "customized" one for my neice , which was intended to play "Age Of Conan" & it came to right ay $1,400.
OCZ StealthXstream 700W,Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R , E8500, Arctic Freezer Pro 7, 3GB G.Skill PC8500,Gigabyte Radeon HD 4850 OC [1GB ], Seagate 250GB SATA II X2 in RAID 0, Samsung SATA DVD burner.

#6 narasimhan

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 06:51 AM

the laptops that u guys have suggested have a low graphics( as 9600 or 9700), which i suppose will not play games like crysis in full graphics. what do u think of
MSI GT 725 which has 4850 graphics card MSI GT 725 or
gateway P 7811 FX which has 9800mGT card Geteway P 7811 FX
? both come under $1500 (without blueray and just dvd writer)

here's a comparison of all notebook graphics cards laptop graphics card comparison

#7 the_patriot11

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 02:09 PM

I have had huge issues with MSI motherboards in the past and generally avoid all of their products at all costs. Gateway is notorious for using low end motherboards like ECS as well, I am not a huge fan. And even with a 4850 on board, you may have issues running Crysis anyway, since Crysis is not solely video card dependent-it also requires a LOT of CPU power and memory as well. the 9700 will run Crysis decent at mid to high settings. Personally, I think the 4850 is a better video card, but I hesitate with the brands. For laptops, gaming wise, I think you would be best served quality/performance wise with either a high end HP, Dell XPS, or ASUS laptops

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#8 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 04:15 PM

Keep in mind, also, friends...buying from a department store is much worse than buying online from a company.

Buying from a store is like buying cheap parts altogether. You want computers that have part providers such as Ricoh, Intel, etc.

#9 DJBPace07

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 05:01 PM

No laptop has desktop graphics cards. All laptops have mobility editions of graphics cards, the MSI one does as well. It has a mobility Radeon, as it says at their site. The Gateway laptop also has a mobility chip as indicated with the "M" at the end of 9800M. Mobility cards are usually stripped down and underpowered offshoots of a desktop card, also bear in mind, that most mobility cards do not use standard drivers. You typically have to get them from the laptop maker or use something like Omega drivers. Can you imagine the heat and noise of the thing if it had a non-mobility 4850 or a GTX 280. You're not going to be able to run Crysis, or some other intensive game, on a laptop with a decent framerate and plenty of eye candy. It's as simple as that. Light gaming, such as running games from 2004 or so will work well, but not most of the newer stuff.

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#10 the_patriot11

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 06:29 PM

Keep in mind, also, friends...buying from a department store is much worse than buying online from a company.

Buying from a store is like buying cheap parts altogether. You want computers that have part providers such as Ricoh, Intel, etc.


ummmm even the cheap ones buy parts from intel and AMD-they are after all the two main CPU companies out there. Sure, theres VIA CPUs, but who games with those? and some times you can get decent quality from department stores, ive seen some beautiful HPs at my local office depot, but overall your right often department stores either have the stripped down, poor quality stuff or their so out of date its not funny. Though I wasnt talking department stores when I was complaining about Acers having cooling problems with their laptops, that was as a whole, I read that a lot about them. just the laptops though, their desktops normally work well and so do their LCD monitors. But generally, laptops are not what most hardcore gamers would use. even the best out there will run crysis at medium settings, but I doubt your gonna get 50-60 fps at maxed out settings with it. where as 900 dollars in a desktop will get you a system that will play crysis with high settings and a playable framerate.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#11 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 10:56 PM

Processors are a given! Processors are what a lot of buyers look at! If the beautiful PCs at department stores were so good, how is it that out of all the users that I have helped, it seemed like they had a hardware issue. When I asked them if they had support by the manufacturer, they say NO I bought this in a store.

#12 the_patriot11

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 11:09 PM

well, that doessnt always mean anything, most store bought laptops and computers come with a manufacturers warranty and the manufacturer often will help them with that, just most people dont realize this because they assume since they bought it in a store there is no help out their for them and just throw away the paperwork. It is a common misconception that store bought computers come with no warranties. some stores even have a warranty on their products on top of the manufacturer warranty.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#13 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 12:44 AM

What about complete care, extended support and warranties, or live help?

Warranties are always done in Dept. Stores. No brainer, right?

I am talking about extended support, the stuff you can count on!

#14 DJBPace07

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 03:25 AM

Just because you get a warranty doesn't mean it's a good one. When Dell started their Dell Connect service, the techs were always off-shore and insisted on connecting with your PC to help you, even for hardware issues. Unfortunately, the latency and various network settings often caused a slow down and made the service difficult to use. You could always skip the laptop and Dell and simply build your own. That would guarantee the quality of parts and really make your money go farther.

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#15 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 03:59 AM

Building is a whole different level, and I completely like the idea as well!




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