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Teenagers and Keyloggers


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#1 groovicus

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 11:55 AM

Some time ago I was involved in a debate regarding the ethics of using a keylogger to monitor the activities of children while they are on the Internet. I was astonished to discover that some parents feel it is more important to respect a child's privacy than it is to try and protect them from predators and other Internet dangers.

So what is more important? Respecting privacy, or protecting your children?

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#2 Pandy

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 12:26 PM

It is definitely more important to protect my children. I monitor my kids' internet use. If I had ANY reason to think that one of my children were in any sort of involvement with bad chat rooms or bad individuals I would have absolutely NO PROBLEM using a keylogger to see what is going on. I do respect my childrens' privacy. But as long as they are children and under my roof then it is my OBLIGATION to make sure they are protected. HELLO! it's my job. My 12 year old son is not old enough to be typing to a girlfriend and I don't feel I would be invading his privacy. HA! He has none as long as he is under my watch. Yeah it can be a chore to be so watchful. Sometimes the kids give me flack about it. But that is the price I pay if I want my computer to be connected to the internet. It is like immunizations. LOL it's not pleasant but a needed precaution.

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#3 Scarlett

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 12:50 PM

I was astonished to discover that some parents feel it is more important to respect a child's privacy than it is to try and protect them from predators and other Internet dangers.

So what is more important? Respecting privacy, or protecting your children?

Respect a childs privacy? Children do not have the need for privacy. Not as far as internet usage is concerned.

There is no way to protect your children and respect thier privacy at the same time.

So if your children spend time on-line. Then do all you can to monitor thier activities.

In my opinion, I do not think that young ones need to be on-line at all. Except for maybe homework help. In this case, again they should be monitored.

They do NOT need to be using any form of instant messenger! IMHO

That is where MOST problems occur.

And if a parent, has administrative control on the family computer. Then they can not down load anything eiether.
Which also causes many problems.

If they have an e-mail account. Then the parent should have the password kept private. Then they could open the e-mail account for the child. Again a great way to monitor the child.
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#4 jgweed

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 01:47 PM

One would hesitate to make a blanket statement, I suggest, or in making the choice an either/or situation. Certainly it depends on the age and maturity level of the individual child; rules for a 12-year old might differ from a high school senior, for example.
Resulting to keylogging indicates a breakdown of parental authority, a certain bond within a family between children and parents, and an absence of teaching children what are right/wrong or appropriate/inappropriate actions.

Regards,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#5 Starbuck

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 04:27 PM

i can see what you are all saying, but.... remember that women are more protective of their children.
Scarlett you say that children don't need to use any form of messenger...... but they do!!!!!!
it's become a way of life for children and nothing will stop them.
they can get access to a computer in schools, the library or a friends home!!
At the end of the day it all boils down to Trust!!
Keep the computer in a place where you can monitor what is going on.... but give them the respect that they deserve.
At the end of the day children are individuals and they can't become individuals when someone is looking over their shoulder all the time.
Children go out to play, they need peers to communicate and grow into adults.
We're not out in the playgrounds with them, and i'm sure you'll agree, that a lot worse can happen out there!
I'd rather have them chatting to their friends on messenger, where i can see them, than being out and not knowing who they're talking too!
This is just my opinion!!

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#6 efizzer

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 05:48 PM

I have to stand on the thin line between the extremes. Keep an eye on what they do and where they go, but give them freedom to explore.
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#7 nmdamgud

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 10:13 PM

those parents who say they are "respecting their children's privacy" are usually the ones who do not want to take the time to monitor those children...they're too busy living their own. they are also usually the very FIRST to scream "abuse!" and hire a lawyer.

#8 frankie12

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 11:09 PM

I say that children should be monitored, but at the same time try and give them some privacy. You should also let them use IM but only for friends and not for just talking to random people.

#9 Pandy

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 11:18 PM

My oldest is 17. He IM's with people when he plays rpg's. Thats fine with me. My daughter does yahoo IM with a couple of school friends but not very often.. only occasionally. The youngest does not have e-mail or IM. LOL He likes to play what his big brother plays.. but not online. LOL I trust my kids tho. But I told them I didn't trust people "out there". They understand and do not mind if I eavesdrop on their IM sessions. lol We seem to manage. I like to IM myself so I understand they want to. But they know it is my job. If I didn't care I would just not bother.. they know I care because I do bother.

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#10 Starbuck

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Posted 10 June 2005 - 02:59 AM

Our children range from 13 - 19, all of them have only limited accounts on the computer and our computer is in the 'family room'.
They are so used to people being around them when they are on line that it doesn't bother them at all.
They only have their friends on their IM lists and none of them are allowed into chatrooms.
We just feel that setting a few rules is better than a total ban.

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#11 Scarlett

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Posted 10 June 2005 - 10:36 AM

MSNBC Article: For kids, danger lurks a click away

Internet activities are easier than ever to hide from parents. How can you keep out predators and pornography?

Excerpt: What can parents do?
Here's what Internet service providers and experts say:


Constantly monitor your child's online activity.  Install service provider controls and filtering software. “Pick one that's easiest for you as the parents,” said Rice Hughes.

Keep the computer with Internet access where you can see it.  “I would rather see a child’s nose bent out of joint because their parents got too intrusive, versus have something tragic happen to them,” said Lamb.

Warn your children about the dangers, and learn the lingo. When your kids communicate online you need to understand what they're saying.  “One of the common things you'll see is a/s/l. On a chat question that means age sex and location,” said Brown. “Well, an unsuspecting child will respond with truthful information.”

Never give out personal information.

And what do experts say tops the to-do list? Talk to your children.


Edited by scarlett, 10 June 2005 - 10:38 AM.

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#12 rigel

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Posted 11 June 2005 - 09:35 PM

Kids will be kids...

That is why we have to be responsible parents. If you need a keylogger to keep your child safe, then do it. Then evaluate what is happening. There has to be a foundation early that clearly states right and wrong. You break that and then you have consequences. No questions. Personal Responsibilty is manditory.

Soooooooo, under 15, no privacy whatsoever. After that, there has to be trust until it is violated.

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#13 johnnyking2007grd

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 05:55 PM

I am 18 i am still in school I am currently taking Computer Forensics I will tell you that is right to monitor your kids there are some really creepy people out there! I have done some investigations online chatting and i will tell you it gets creepy I wouldnt mind my mom still montoring me online and i am 18. I wouldnt change a thing that i do online! Remeber you never know who is on the outher end of the computer talking to your kidskeep it safe :thumbsup:

#14 raw

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 10:27 PM

I had this issue not long ago with my ex and her daughter.
If it wasn't for keylogging and IM monitoring
we would not have known that an older boy was saying some pretty bad
stuff that a 12 year old girl should not be reading.
When i called his house he thought i was playing a joke on him.
When i showed up at his door it was quite a different story.
I politely explained to his parents that i could do very bad things...including having their
internet service terminated. The parents actually installed monitoring software after this to keep an
eye on their son.
So yes monitoring is good and besides children (and parents) should not expect any
amount of privacy on the 'net.
The internet is a great resource and also a very dangerous place.
We need to protect the ones we love from the bad guys.
Like we do here @ BC :thumbsup:

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#15 yano

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 12:20 AM

I may me be a "child," however I have thought about what my kids would be like when I grow up. I was thinking that since I know more about computers than my parents, sure the bleep that my kids in the future are going to know more about computers than I will. So I think any efforts that I would try to make in the future might fail. However I would like to know what they are doing :thumbsup:

When I had AOL I use to hang out in those chat rooms, and let me tell you its like walking down a back street in New York city with a city park no more than a street away. Its nothing but whore house with some of the weirdest people you will meet. AOL chat rooms are the weirdest places to find people and personally I think they should be avoided. AOL has gone down the tube so much that its chat rooms are going with it.

Parents be warned of the AOL chatrooms. A lot of sexual explicity content is exchanged there.

My parents have trusted me a child on AOL, and gave me a "General" account there when I was younger. This was because I couldn't access any websites that were decent back then. This was before they had it where you could "ask to unblock" certain webpages.

Edited by yanowhiz, 13 June 2005 - 12:27 AM.





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