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Subnet mask


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8 replies to this topic

#1 raj29

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Posted 07 March 2009 - 03:59 AM

:thumbsup:What is subnet mask? Why people some times change their default subnet mask?
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#2 burn1337

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Posted 07 March 2009 - 06:17 PM

The subnet mask is basically what tells the network how deep a computer is in the network for one ip address... For instance your first router would give the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 the next router on the chain would give 255.255.0.0 (with both routers on the ip of 192.168.1.1)... If you change the router Ip's say first router is 192.168.1.1, the next in the chain would be 192.168.2.1, or 192.168.3.1... Then you can get around having to change the subnet mask...

#3 patbox

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Posted 07 March 2009 - 11:15 PM

The subnet mask is basically what tells the network how deep a computer is in the network for one ip address... For instance your first router would give the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 the next router on the chain would give 255.255.0.0 (with both routers on the ip of 192.168.1.1)... If you change the router Ip's say first router is 192.168.1.1, the next in the chain would be 192.168.2.1, or 192.168.3.1... Then you can get around having to change the subnet mask...


Ok, but why do we need the subnetmask at all? I understand that each PC or router has its own IP. I also understand that the gateway for my PC is my router's IP. But I also have a problem understanding what does the subnetmask stand for? Can I change it to 111.111.111.0 instead of 255.255.255.0? Can I delete it?

From your post I understood that you would need subnet mask only if you want to call 2 different routers with the same IP. But why would anyone want to do that?
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#4 raj29

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 06:05 AM

Thank you burn1337 for your valuable information. But still it is not very clear to me. As patbox- I also wanted to know the same question?
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#5 tos226

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 01:16 PM

Subnet mask controls how many bits of the IP address belong to your computer, how many to the router(s).
In a typical home setup of computers and routers, 8 bits belong to the computer (rightmost number after the dot), and remaining 24 bits belong to the network.
Mask is used to, well, mask - which is a logical AND operation (1 and 1=1, 1 and 0=0).
More here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subnetwork
and of course on our own forum is a related tutorial
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/ip-addresses-explained/

Edited by tos226, 09 March 2009 - 01:21 PM.


#6 raj29

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 02:15 AM

Thank you very much. Now it is really clear to me.
I am the Saint and the Soldier that walks in Peace. I am the Humble dust of your feet, But don't think my Spirituality makes me weak. The Heavens will roar if my Sword were to speak...

#7 patbox

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 07:00 AM

Thank you very much. Now it is really clear to me.


Tos226 is the best :thumbsup:

@raj29: there are also cool tutorial on networking here at bleepingcomputer under the tutorials tab.
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#8 Monty007

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 04:56 PM

Hi, if you want to play around with IPs ect go to this site and you can see what happends when you change settings ect. http://www.subnet-calculator.com/subnet.php?net_class=B
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#9 burn1337

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 04:03 AM

Sorry I was not here to make it more clear for you, and thank you tos for clearing it up for me.




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