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#1 Swordie

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 10:06 PM

I've been wondering for a long time; and I'd also like to know so the next time I go computer building, I'll know which one to get.
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#2 Vaerli

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 01:44 AM

DDR is the slowest, and they progress to higher speeds. Most motherboards aren't compatible with two types (like DDR2 and DDR3) Some are, but i'm pretty sure you can't mix and match the two.

Meanwhile, the PC-6400 numbers signify the speed. Also known as DDR2 800mhz ram, PC-6400 is just another way of putting it. I'm not sure exactly what it means. The higher the numbers, the faster the RAM.

So, the higher the better. I think some of the new core i7s require DDR3, or maybe its just that they recommend triple channel, i don't know for sure.

I've got DDR2 800 or PC-6400 and it runs pretty well but is one of the more bottleneck components of my build. I'd go for DDR3 if you have the budget when you make you next computer.

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#3 DaChew

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 01:52 AM

Define slow


--------[ Memory Latency ]----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Athlon64 3500+ 2250 MHz Asus A8V Deluxe K8T800Pro Dual DDR500 2.5-4-4-10 CR1 46.5 ns
Athlon64 X2 Black 6400+ 3200 MHz MSI K9N SLI Platinum nForce570SLI Dual DDR2-800 4-4-4-11 CR1 47.2 ns
Athlon64 3200+ 2000 MHz ASRock 939S56-M SiS756 Dual DDR400 2.5-3-3-8 CR2 55.2 ns
Sempron 2600+ 1600 MHz ASRock K8NF4G-SATA2 GeForce6100 Int.

DDR400 SDRAM 2.5-3-3-8 CR2 58.9 ns

With a clean boot and nothing running I can hit below 45

Edited by DaChew, 04 March 2009 - 01:55 AM.

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#4 dc3

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 02:10 AM

If the only reason that you want this information is to know what RAM to purchase for your next build then all you need to do is check out the specification for the motherboard. Here is a good example at Newegg, the specifications show the RAM that is supported by the motherboard.

The following information came from this article.

What does RAM speed mean?
14th October 2008 [PC Pro]

The next issue to consider is speed. RAM speeds can be quite confusing, as they can be expressed in several ways. Starting with the oldest DDR modules, the basic models run at an internal frequency of 100MHz, while more advanced modules increase the internal clock speed to 133MHz, 166MHz and up to 200MHz.

It might seem logical to refer to these different modules by their internal speeds but, thanks to the double data rate that gives DDR its name, a 100MHz module can carry out a theoretical maximum of 200 million transfers per second, while the 200MHz module can carry out 400 million transfers per second. For this reason, 100MHz DDR is known as DDR-200, 133MHz modules are labelled DDR-266 and so forth.

This is a fairly obvious system, but RAM transfers aren't very convenient units to work in. It's much more common to talk about data in terms of bytes. So to make DIMM speeds more easily understandable, they're also given a "PC-rating", which expresses their bandwidth in megabytes per second.

PC ratings can be calculated very simply. Each RAM transfer consists of a 64-bit word, or eight bytes. So to convert transfers-per-second into bytes-per-second, you simply multiply by eight. DDR-200 is thus equivalent to PC-1600.

DDR2 uses almost the same naming conventions, but the chips communicate with the CPU at twice the speed of DDR. The slowest DDR2 is therefore capable of 400 million transfers per second, and is designated DDR2-400, or PC2-3200. As you'd expect, DDR2 goes up to DDR2-800, also known as PC2-6400, and above this there's a high-end part, based on 266MHz chips, to give DDR2-1066. Its PC-rating is rounded down to PC2-8500 for convenience - its peak bandwidth is more like 8,533MB/sec.

DDR3 extends this process, running the I/O bus at four times the speeds of DDR - so the basic part can handle 800 million transfers per second, earning the labels DDR3-800 and PC3-6400, with faster chips being named accordingly.

The maximum standard RAM speeds approved by JEDEC - the body behind the three DDR standards - are DDR-400, DDR2-1066 and DDR3-1600. You may also hear of modules with higher speed ratings, such as DDR2-1250 and DDR3-2000, designed to run at overclocked speeds in enthusiast motherboards.

Edit: I would also suggest doing a google search for more information, remember... google is your friend.

Edited by dc3, 04 March 2009 - 02:12 AM.

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#5 audioAl

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 06:10 AM

Man, that was smooth!! I know some of the above, but, your articulation is right on! Cheers!


Edit: Edited to remove unnecessary quote. ~tg
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#6 Swordie

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 06:49 PM

Well, i'm using this is information for my next build as well as some background knowledge. Thank you both DC3 and DaChew, your information really helped me.

DDR3 PC-12500 sounds like my kind of RAM..
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#7 Vaerli

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 07:26 PM

Oh, it is if you don't mind spending lots on a computer. Once you hit a certain speed though, RAM starts getting exponentially more expensive.

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#8 Swordie

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 07:29 PM

Yeah. There's an 8GB kit (2x4) for 99.99 that is DDR3. I'm planning to get a Quad Core (probably a 2.66 GHZ if not i'll get a 2.8) or a AMD Phenom Black, so I can OC it.
I've seen 1 stick of 4GB RAM for 39.99. Those are DDR2.
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#9 dc3

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 11:18 PM

Remember... a 32-bit operating system will only see 3.0GB to 3.5GB of RAM due to the Address Space which has a total of 4GB and must use some of that space for other functions. If you are going to go with that much RAM you will need a 64-bit operating system.

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#10 Swordie

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 11:22 PM

Most definitely. And I believe that number is 3.3GB.

May I ask, what's the difference between 64 and 32 bits. It's off-topic, but I suppose it's a simple answer.
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#11 dc3

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 11:26 PM

That's not right because it depends on each system and what is being used. A 32-bit operating system has a total address space of 4GB, this address space is also used by System ROM, APIC(s), Integrated PCI devices, such as network connectors and SCSI controllers, PCI cards, Graphics cards, and PCI Express cards. So the amount will vary with each machine.

As for the rest, you really should do a search for the information, it's out there and google is your friend. :thumbsup:

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#12 Swordie

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Posted 05 March 2009 - 05:47 PM

Thanks--

And I do believe the address is 4GB, but Windows will only manage 3.3. Besides that fact, most OEM's for 32 Bit's have a set limit, generally 1 or 2GB RAM max. My old PC has a Motherboard limit of 2GB.
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#13 dc3

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 02:21 AM

And I do believe the address is 4GB, but Windows will only manage 3.3. Besides that fact, most OEM's for 32 Bit's have a set limit, generally 1 or 2GB RAM max. My old PC has a Motherboard limit of 2GB.


I've already point this out, I will reiterate... a 32-bit operating system has ]b]total[/b] Address Space of 4GB. It doesn't matter if it is a custom build or a OEM it will be the same, this is specific to the operating system. As I pointed out previously, the determining factor will be the amount of devices sharing that space. It looks like you are confusing the maximum amount of RAM that a motherboard will support, this is completely different.

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#14 DaChew

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 07:07 AM

Understanding the concept of addressable is hard, 32 bit just means 32 0's or 1's can be used in this mapping/index?

Windows 32 bit can manage 4 gigs, video memory has to be mapped, if you have a 512 meg video card you lose that much from addressable right away

Somehow this must have a limit tho, now that there are 1-2 gig video cards?

EDIT:Here's an example of what I was talking about before regarding slow/fast ram

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...-L0D-_-20231225

DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 but CAS 9

Cas is all about wait states, you speed the ram up to 1600, then slow it back down to cas 9
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