Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Computer Not Recognizing RAM


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Klickinater

Klickinater

  • Members
  • 14 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:44 AM

Posted 02 March 2009 - 12:31 AM

I built my first computer with speed in mind. I felt that if I was going to spend so much money and time to build a computer it better be worth it. So I got an Intel Quad Core processor and 4 gigs of RAM (in two cards) to put in. Now, even though everything works, when I go to the "System" window from the Control Panel, it says I only have 2.75 gigs of RAM. My question is, where did that 1.25 gigs of RAM go? Is it being used and just doesn't show up? With a Quad Core I should be able to run up to 8 Gigs.

Thanks,
Klickinater

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:44 AM

Posted 02 March 2009 - 01:47 AM

Is your operating system 64 or 32 bit? If you have a 64-bit operating system, you can see and use 4GB or more of RAM. Otherwise, portions of memory will be used for addressing, among other things, and will be unavailable.

3939.png

 


#3 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,489 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:08:44 AM

Posted 02 March 2009 - 02:21 AM

Just to expand on what DJBPace07 posted, a 32-bit operating system has a total address space of 4GB, this address space is also used by System ROM, APIC(s), Integrated PCI devices, such as network connectors and SCSI controllers, PCI cards, Graphics cards, and PCI Express cards. Because these are taking up address space a full 4GB of Ram cannot be utilized.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 Klickinater

Klickinater
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 14 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:44 AM

Posted 02 March 2009 - 06:26 PM

Does that mean for my computer to recognize more RAM than what it does now, I will have to get another operating system despite having a Quad Core Processor? Is there anyway for XP to utilize 4+ gigs of RAM?

#5 fairjoeblue

fairjoeblue

  • Members
  • 1,594 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA
  • Local time:10:44 AM

Posted 02 March 2009 - 06:48 PM

A 32 bit version of Windows is limited to how much memory it ca "see" .

In order to use 4 GB of memory & Windows "see" all of it you will need a 64 bit version of Windows.

How many cores a CPU has doesn't matter when it comes to memory.

It' a matter of what the motherboard can handle & how much the operating system will recognize as being there.
OCZ StealthXstream 700W,Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R , E8500, Arctic Freezer Pro 7, 3GB G.Skill PC8500,Gigabyte Radeon HD 4850 OC [1GB ], Seagate 250GB SATA II X2 in RAID 0, Samsung SATA DVD burner.

#6 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:44 AM

Posted 02 March 2009 - 07:01 PM

Nope. To make your situation more complex, XP 64-bit is not very good and you should consider Vista 64-bit if you choose to upgrade, XP Pro 64-bit is actually more expensive than Vista Home Premium 64-bit. But why bother if Windows 7 will be out in a few months when you can upgrade then. The amount of memory supported is not determined solely by the CPU but by the motherboard. For example, you could have a single or dual core CPU installed in a board that can take up to 8GB of RAM. The CPU must support 64-bit in order to run the 64-bit operating system which will run with more than 4GB of RAM. Almost all modern CPU's support 64-bit processing. My suggestion is to stick with what you've got for now and upgrade to Windows 7 64-bit when it is released. Note that to upgrade to a 64-bit platform you will need to do a clean install, also, the upgrade process from XP to Windows 7 requires a clean install regardless of whether or not it is 64-bit.

Further Reading:
Wikipedia - X86-64
Wikipedia - 64-bit
Microsoft - 32-bit and 64-bit Windows: frequently asked questions

Edited by DJBPace07, 02 March 2009 - 07:08 PM.

3939.png

 


#7 Klickinater

Klickinater
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 14 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:44 AM

Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:10 PM

By clean install, you mean wiping my hard drive? And thanks for the info, I will look into it.

#8 Swordie

Swordie

  • Members
  • 792 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Miami, Florida
  • Local time:10:44 AM

Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:48 PM

By clean install, you mean wiping my hard drive? And thanks for the info, I will look into it.


Yes. It's like starting over. Straight out of the box.
Just back up all your info and it will be a snap. W7 won't be out for another 8 months or so, you have some time to think.
Who said I couldn't have everything?




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users