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Svcchost infection


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#1 ACanadianFan

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 11:38 AM

A few days ago my machine would only boot into safe mode. I went through the process of disabling all services and startup items through MSConfig. Then slowly bringing everything back until I found the culprit. It seems that the video drivers were causing the problem. I uninstalled the drivers, got latest, reinstalled and now things are working. But I did find a blank line in my Msconfig. That prompted me to look into the Norton history and I found the following:

1) gaopdxserv.sys modified your Windows System Settings.
Activity: loaded driver gaopdxserv.sys - I have deleted any trace of this file I could find.
2) tempo-7444468.tmp accessed your network resources.
Activity: modified resource \REGISTRY\MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcp\Parameters\Interface\{0C27E4DB-9D67-4CAF-BDCA-8A2E943AA158}\NameServer
There is an option to "Remove this Program", but I don't know what it's for, so I didn't remove it.
3) Backdoor.Tidserv!inf detected by Auto-Protect. Norton says it was fully removed. 23/02/2009 09:34:38
4) Packed.Generic.200 detected by Auto-Protect. Norton says it was fully removed. 23/02/2009 11:52:43
5) Packed.Generic.200 detected by Auto-Protect. Norton says it was fully removed. 23/02/2009 14:30:39

I looked at task manager and noticed "Svcchost.exe." running. I also noticed there was an item in my startup folder called "Svcchost.exe". After some Googling, I didn't like the looks of things, so I started down the trail of removing it.

I have since done a full Norton, Spybot and Malwarebytes Anti-Malware scan in Safe mode. I've cleaned everything that was suspect. I also deleted any trace of the "gaopdxserv.sys" file I could find. I also use CCleaner regularily and clean most everything (cookies, temporary files, etc).

I found, through Google that the backdoor trojan can be used to download other "nasties" that can be used to steal passwords etc.

My question now: Is there anything else I should do or am I clean. I am afraid something may still be lurking.

This machine is running Windows XP Pro SP3 and is connected (wired) to a router. This is the machine we use for banking, paying bills etc. Hence my concern.
The second machine is a laptop running Vista with a wireless connection to the router. We don't use this for anything critical (banking, bills, etc).

Thanks in advance.

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 11:51 AM

Scanning with MBAM in safe or normal mode will work but removal functions are not as powerful in safe mode. MBAM is designed to be at full power when malware is running so safe mode is not necessary when using it. In fact, it loses some effectiveness for detection & removal when used in safe mode because the program includes a special driver which does not work in safe mode. Further, scanning in safe mode prevents some types of malware from running so it may be missed during the detection process. For optimal removal, normal mode is recommended so it does not limit the abilities of MBAM. Doing a safe mode scan should only be done when a regular mode scan fails.

Please post the results of your MBAM scan for review.

To retrieve the MBAM scan log information, launch MBAB.
  • Click the Logs Tab at the top.
    • The log will be named by the date of scan in the following format:
      mbam-log-2009-01-12(13-35-16).txt <- your dates will be different from this example
      -- If you have previously used MBAM, there may be several logs showing in the list.
  • Click on the log name to highlight it.
  • Go to the bottom and click on Open.
  • The log should automatically open in notepad as a text file.
  • Go to Edit and choose Select all.
  • Go back to Edit and choose Copy or right-click on the highlighted text and choose copy from there.
  • Come back to this thread, click Add Reply, then right-click and choose Paste.
  • Be sure to post the complete log to include the top portion which shows MBAM's database version and your operating system.
  • Exit MBAM when done.
If you're using Windows 2000/XP, please print out and follow these instructions: "How to use SDFix". <- for Windows 2000/XP ONLY!
When using this tool, you must use the Administrator's account or an account with "Administrative rights"
  • Disconnect from the Internet and temporarily disable your anti-virus, script blocking and any real time protection programs before performing a scan.
  • Please be patient as the scan may take up to 20 minutes to complete.
  • When the process is complete, the SDFix report log will open in Notepad and automatically be saved in the SDFix folder as Report.txt.
  • If SDFix is unable to run after rebooting from Safe Mode, run SDFix in either Mode, and type F, then press Enter for it to finish the final stage and produce the report.
  • The SDFix report log (Report.txt) will open in Notepad and automatically be saved in the SDFix folder.
  • Please copy and paste the contents of Report.txt in your next reply.
  • Be sure to re-enable you anti-virus and other security programs before connecting to the Internet.
IMPORTANT NOTE: svcchost.exe was a backdoor Trojan.Sdbot. Backdoor Trojans, IRCBots and Infostealers are very dangerous because they provide a means of accessing a computer system that bypasses security mechanisms and steal sensitive information like passwords, personal and financial data which they send back to the hacker. Remote attackers use backdoor Trojans as part of an exploit to gain unauthorized access to a computer and take control of it without your knowledge. Read Danger: Remote Access Trojans.

If your computer was used for online banking, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it, all passwords should be changed immediately to include those used for banking, email, eBay, paypal and online forums. You should consider them to be compromised. They should be changed using a clean computer and not the infected one. If not, an attacker may get the new passwords and transaction information. If using a router, you need to reset it with a strong logon/password so the malware cannot gain control again. and credit card institutions should be notified of the possible security breach. Because your computer was compromised please read:Although the infection was identified and removed, your PC has likely been compromised and there is no way to be sure the computer can ever be trusted again. It is dangerous and incorrect to assume that because this malware has been removed the computer is now secure. In some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to your system that it cannot be completely cleaned or repaired. The malware may leave so many remnants behind that security tools cannot find them. Many experts in the security community believe that once infected with this type of malware, the best course of action is to wipe the drive clean, reformat and reinstall the OS. Please read:
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#3 ACanadianFan

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 12:30 PM

Given everything you said about cleaning, what concern's me is the banking portion. If it is best believed I wipe the drive and re-install, I'll do it. Even though it's a pain and a long process, I always believe better safe than sorry. So should I wipe the drive or go ahead with MBAM and SDFix?

#4 quietman7

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 12:41 PM

Your decision as to what action to take should be made by reading and asking yourself the questions presented in the "When should I re-format?" and What Do I Do? links I previously provided. As I already said, in some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to your system that it cannot be completely cleaned or repaired. Wiping your drive, reformatting, and performing a clean install of the OS or doing a factory restore with a vendor-specific Recovery Disk or Recovery Partition removes everything and is the safest action but I cannot make that decision for you.
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#5 ACanadianFan

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 01:13 PM

I think I'll sleep better if I rebuild. It's personal PC that I use for misc. stuff and games. Nothing major that I can't be without for a few days. We always do our bills and stuff on here because the laptop is wireless and I feel the wired one is more secure. In the meantime, we can use the laptop for anything we need to do. Banking passwords have been changed and I'll call credit card companies next. What's really funny about this is that last night I got an email from my brother asking me about "svohost.exe". AVG notified him about it. Guess I'll have to give him a call with the news.

One last question. My machine has two hard drives with windows installed on both. If I copy data files (music, pictures etc) from one HD to the other for backup, do you think it's safe? Or could I just be creating more problems. I will re-install on the other drive also but I'd like to be able to use it for backup first. I would also guess it doesn't make any difference which one I reformat first.

#6 quietman7

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 01:28 PM

Sometimes a reformat is the best solution.

Reformatting a hard disk deletes all data. If you decide to reformat, you can back up all your important documents, personal data files and photos. The safest practice is not to backup any executable files (*.exe), screensavers (*.scr), autorun (.ini) or HTML files because they may be infected by malware. Some types of malware may even disguise itself by adding and hiding its extension to the existing extension of files so be sure you look closely at the full file name. After reformatting, as a precaution, make sure you scan these files with your anti-virus prior to copying them back to your hard drive.

In case you need help with this, please review:These links include step-by-step instructions with screenshots:Don't forget you will have to go to Microsoft Update and apply all Windows security patches after reformatting.
Also see How to keep your Windows XP activation after clean install.

Note: If your using an IBM, HP, Compaq or Dell machine, you may not have an original XP CD Disk. By policy Microsoft no longer allows OEM manufactures to include the original Windows XP CD-ROM on computers sold with Windows preinstalled. Instead, most computers manufactured and sold by OEM vendors come with a vendor-specific Recovery Disk or Recovery Partition for performing a clean "factory restore" that will reformat your hard drive, remove all data and restore the computer to the state it was in when you first purchased it. See Technology Advisory Recovery Media

If you need additional assistance with reformatting, or have questions about multiple hard drives, you can start a new topic in the Windows XP Home and Professional forum. If you don't get a reply, please send me a PM and I will get someone to take a look.
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