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startup error after reinstall missing system32/hal.dll


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#1 mb9023

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 04:03 PM

So recently my friend's computer got badly infected, and it was recommended by users here that I wipe his hard drive. I attempted to restore from his recovery partition drive, but it encountered a fatal system error. I formatted that partition, since it wasn't working, so it would let me boot into the XP MCE 2005 with Update Rollup 2 Operating System Disc. (This is a Gateway GT5224 desktop, btw). It asks me to press 'R' once or twice, and it goes into the Windows setup screen, giving me two options of a destructive reinstall or a backup reinstall. I choose destructive, it completes, and I reboot getting the error:

Windows could not start becaue the following file is missing or corrupt:
<windows root>\system32\hal.dll.
Please re-install a copy of the above file.

I know about the recovery console and chkdsk and such, but there doesn't seem to be one?
I also have a Gateway XP Home system recovery CD which it errors on when I try to boot into.
Any help is greatly appreciated.

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#2 Budapest

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 05:13 PM

You can create your own Recovery Console disk with this file:

http://www.thecomputerparamedic.com/files/rc.iso

You must burn this file to a CD as an ISO. Post back if you need more information on how to do this.
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#3 mb9023

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 05:45 PM

Ok, well I did manage to get into recovery console with that, (after pressing F5 during setup and manually selecting Standard PC), but I run chkdsk and it says The volume appears to contain one or more unrecoverable problems.

Does this mean I'm screwed?

#4 Budapest

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 05:56 PM

Possibly. Next step is to run a diagnostic on the hard drive.
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#5 mb9023

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 05:57 PM

how would I got about doing that?

my older brother recommended making an Ultimate Boot CD so I was going to try that as well.

I would try to slave the hard drive and copy a working hal.dll on it, but my comp doesn't support SATA.

Edited by mb9023, 24 February 2009 - 06:05 PM.


#6 Budapest

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 06:05 PM

The UBCD is a good idea, as it includes the Gateway hard drive diagnostic (GWSCAN).

http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

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#7 mb9023

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 09:33 PM

The diagnostics came back with no errors from the ubcd. Is there anything I can do short of directly copying the file into the directory?

#8 Budapest

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 10:15 PM

Directly copying the file over is probably the easiest solution.
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#9 Stang777

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 11:10 PM

The diagnostics came back with no errors from the ubcd. Is there anything I can do short of directly copying the file into the directory?

If you end up doing that and if it will not let you just copy the file into that directory, I found an article that gives pretty good directions for how to do it. I hope it will work with just that Recovery Console disk that you made. The link for the article is below and the article follows.....

http://pcsupport.about.com/od/fixtheproble...storehaldll.htm

The hal.dll file is a hidden file that is used by Windows XP to communicate with your computer's hardware. Hal.dll can become damaged, corrupted or deleted for a number of reasons and is usually brought to your attention by the "missing or corrupt hal.dll" error message.

Follow these easy steps to restore the damaged/corrupted or missing hal.dll file from the Windows XP CD using the Recovery Console.

Difficulty: Easy
Time Required: Restoring hal.dll from the Windows XP CD usually takes less than 15 minutes
Here's How:
Enter Windows XP Recovery Console.

When you reach the command prompt (detailed in Step 6 in the link above), type the following and then press Enter:

expand d:\i386\hal.dl_ c:\windows\system32\hal.dll
Using the expand command as shown above, d represents the drive letter assigned to the optical drive that your Windows XP CD is currently in. While this is most often d, your system could assign a different letter. Also, c:\windows represents the drive and folder that Windows XP is currently installed on. Again, this is most often the case but your system could be different.

If you're prompted to overwrite the file, press Y.

Take out the Windows XP CD, type exit and then press Enter to restart your PC.

Assuming that a missing or corrupt hal.dll file was your only issue, Windows XP should now start normally.

Edited by Stang777, 24 February 2009 - 11:14 PM.





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