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Best Motherboard ... Fast & Stable


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#1 Nicholas7

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 08:11 PM

Okay, well, I am 14 years old and have a budget as I don't make a lot of money :huh: . So for the question, I'm wanting to have a Stable system, in which i can probably have 80 or so processes running on it in which...it seems to not have them running :huh: (common issue). I'm wanting to start a small hosting service for myself and some fellow online friends, and also do some java coding & testing, and maybe even some good ol gamin...nothing extreme like CoD5...Maximum is CoD4, but that relies mostly on the GFX card. So, the system will need to be on Quite Often (Overheating comes into effect). I'm willing to spend 200-250 dollars on this motherboard.

I've been just a P3 / P4 man, but now days, Duo or Quad is the new thing. I no longer kept up to date on these, and now am lost on the things i need to know about them, like whats best :D. So, I'm basically asking someone with either A. long computer hardware history, or B. someone who reads and knows their cpus and mobos. I've heard a few things about Asus PSKC...definitely it is in my price range, just don't know about it's processor support.

So i have about 2 questions in all, What is the most stable motherboard, that can take heat, and can have a very nice cpu speed, and then what's the best CPU now days, under $150...and for extra long leg, whats the main difference between the good ol' 3.2 extreme P4, Duo Core..unknown speed, and the Quad Core..unknown speed.

Hopefully i made this post understandable as this is a major topic many people probably have wondered about and can't explain it in the right words.

--Thanks for taking your time to Read and maybe even post :thumbsup:

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#2 fairjoeblue

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 09:38 PM

It's actually hard for somebody to recommend a motherboard & guarantee it will be "fast & stable."
Since motherboards are mass produce one person may get a certain model that "screams" & has no issues.
Another person may buy the same model & get a real lemon.

With that said, If I were looking for components in your price range I would get a ,

Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3P

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16813128358

I do not own one [yet] but from all I have read [not just on newegg] it is one of the better boards.
The one caveat is it has NO onboard video so a card is required.
[As far as I'm concerned that is actually a +]

For a CPU I'd go with a Core2Duo E8400

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819115037

It's a little over your $150, mark but since the motherboard is less then your $200. budget...

Edited by fairjoeblue, 22 February 2009 - 09:38 PM.

OCZ StealthXstream 700W,Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R , E8500, Arctic Freezer Pro 7, 3GB G.Skill PC8500,Gigabyte Radeon HD 4850 OC [1GB ], Seagate 250GB SATA II X2 in RAID 0, Samsung SATA DVD burner.

#3 Nicholas7

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 10:42 PM

Thank's for taking your time to reply. I will look into that, i just spent all night...well 4 hours looking and ran across and started to like a Gigabyte GA-E7AUM I curerntly am running a Gigabyte on this computer...love it, just figured Gigabyte was out of date, but they have came back in style

#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 11:09 PM

There are a number of differences between a single, dual, tri, and quad core. A CPU has cores that handle processing, the more cores, the faster the CPU can be. However, if a program is not designed for multi-core processing, it cannot take full advantage of the other cores and is thus limited by clock speed. Most recent games are able to use at least two cores. Also, the CPU's architecture has a great deal to do with speed. For instance, a P4 and a Core 2 running a single-core-only application at the same clock speed will have differing performance, most likely the victor would be the Core 2 with its newer, more efficient design. As fairjoeblue pointed out, boards are mass produced so quality, and thus stability, fluctuates a bit. Below are some suggested CPU/Motherboard combination's.

AMD - Will usually cost less than an Intel combination, but the technology is not as bleeding edge.
Motherboard: ASUS M4A78T-E AM3 DDR3 AMD 790GX ATX AMD Motherboard - According to professional reviews, the board is very stable and supports the latest generation of AM3 processors. Because of this, it is a little more expensive than an AM2/AM2+ only board. This board will take Crossfire not SLI. $139

Motherboard: ASUS M3N72-D AM2+/AM2 NVIDIA nForce 750a SLI ATX AMD Motherboard - Similar to the previous motherboard, but offers SLI. You can use AM3 processors with this board if you update to the most recent BIOS. $129

CPU: AMD Phenom II X3 720 2.8GHz 3 x 512KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache Socket AM3 95W Triple-Core Black Processor - One of AMD's newest processors. This is a triple core processor, so it would be more cost effective than a quad. Neither AMD nor Intel offer quads below $150 at a decent clock speed. Intel does not yet offer triple core processors. This processor is also Black Edition meaning that it has unlocked multipliers and can be easily overclocked. The Phenom II series is meant to compete with Intel's mid-range processors and is not intended to beat an i7 or anything above a Q9550. $149

Intel - You will pay more, but the technology is a little newer.
Motherboard: ASUS P5Q Pro LGA 775 Intel P45 ATX Intel Motherboard - This is a solid motherboard that supports Core 2 processors and allows for Crossfire. $129

Motherboard: ASUS P5N-D LGA 775 NVIDIA nForce 750i SLI ATX Intel Motherboard - Similar to the previous Asus board, but has SLI instead of Crossfire. $134

CPU: Go with the one fairjoeblue suggested, its one of the best dual core CPU's around.

Edited by DJBPace07, 23 February 2009 - 01:17 AM.

3939.png

 


#5 Vaerli

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 12:30 AM

Core 2 duo/ Core 2 quads are like 2 or 4 processors stacked into one. So, with my Q6600 its like i've got 4 2.4ghz processors running, which is almost like 9.6 ghz of power. Also, if one program hangs up your processor, others can let you still manuver around on your OS.

I can't quite hit under 150$ for processors, but the E8400 is pretty close, and the Q6600 is worth it in my opinion of doubling your cores(from a core 2 duo) and getting so much more power out of it.

Links - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819115037

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819115017

Oh, wait heres one under 150$ - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819115056


I didn't have good luck with my P5N-D asus motherboard, but it wasn't a huge selling model. I still can't get my 3.5mm microphone jack to work, but its alright with a USB headset.

After a little browsing on newegg, i'm throwing this out here- http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16813138118

Its got quite a few slots, nice memory, good expansion slots, 6 USB ports, and has a good rating on newegg.

Q6600, 4GB g-skill, 8800GT, P5N-D motherboard
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#6 the_patriot11

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 12:47 AM

Honestly, if its not really for anything high end, a dual core CPU will do you just fine, either a core2 duo, or I don't know if youd be willing to be willing to consider AMD or not, but their generally cheaper then intel and offer (in my opinion) comparable performance to intel in most areas. For what your doing right now, I think a quad is overkill, but if you want to plan ahead for the future it might not be a bad investment, I dunno, I can't make that decision for you, however for motherboards I generally recomend Gigabyte, ASUS, or if your on a tight budget, Biostar motherboards, I use these brands in all my builds for myself and customers, and never had issues with them, they have all ran well for me.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#7 DJBPace07

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 01:18 AM

You posted a duplicate in the Internal Hardware forum, but I'll put my post here as well.

There are a number of differences between a single, dual, tri, and quad core. A CPU has cores that handle processing, the more cores, the faster the CPU can be. However, if a program is not designed for multi-core processing, it cannot take full advantage of the other cores and is thus limited by clock speed. Most recent games are able to use at least two cores. Also, the CPU's architecture has a great deal to do with speed. For instance, a P4 and a Core 2 running a single-core-only application at the same clock speed will have differing performance, most likely the victor would be the Core 2 with its newer, more efficient design. As fairjoeblue pointed out, boards are mass produced so quality, and thus stability, fluctuates a bit. Below are some suggested CPU/Motherboard combination's.

AMD - Will usually cost less than an Intel combination, but the technology is not as bleeding edge.
Motherboard: ASUS M4A78T-E AM3 DDR3 AMD 790GX ATX AMD Motherboard - According to professional reviews, the board is very stable and supports the latest generation of AM3 processors. Because of this, it is a little more expensive than an AM2/AM2+ only board. This board will take Crossfire not SLI. $139

Motherboard: ASUS M3N72-D AM2+/AM2 NVIDIA nForce 750a SLI ATX AMD Motherboard - Similar to the previous motherboard, but offers SLI. You can use AM3 processors with this board if you update to the most recent BIOS. $129

CPU: AMD Phenom II X3 720 2.8GHz 3 x 512KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache Socket AM3 95W Triple-Core Black Processor - One of AMD's newest processors. This is a triple core processor, so it would be more cost effective than a quad. Neither AMD nor Intel offer quads below $150 at a decent clock speed. Intel does not yet offer triple core processors. This processor is also Black Edition meaning that it has unlocked multipliers and can be easily overclocked. The Phenom II series is meant to compete with Intel's mid-range processors and is not intended to beat an i7 or anything above a Q9550. $149

Intel - You will pay more, but the technology is a little newer.
Motherboard: ASUS P5Q Pro LGA 775 Intel P45 ATX Intel Motherboard - This is a solid motherboard that supports Core 2 processors and allows for Crossfire. $129

Motherboard: ASUS P5N-D LGA 775 NVIDIA nForce 750i SLI ATX Intel Motherboard - Similar to the previous Asus board, but has SLI instead of Crossfire. $134

CPU: Go with the one fairjoeblue suggested, the Core2Duo E8400, its one of the best dual core CPU's around.

Edited by DJBPace07, 23 February 2009 - 01:19 AM.

3939.png

 


#8 boopme

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 01:31 AM

Hello Nicholas7;
I merged the last topic you started,with your original topic.
Starting 2 topics, about the same problem, is called double posting, and is not allowed on this board.
Please keep all of your replies in this one topic.
The members helping you, will be looking for your responses to their questions, in the topic they replied to.
Posting it elsewhere, will cause a delay in the help you receive, and neither one of us, wants that. smile.gif
When you start several topics, for the same problem, it becomes very confusing to follow, for all of those involved.

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to PM me.
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#9 Nicholas7

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 05:57 PM

Wow thanks for the replies guys...love the people here...and you all love NewEgg i see Lol.

--
boopme
I posted this and then saw the other area which was this and went ahead and posted here realizing my mistake...i couldnt delete my other post so i just left it.

#10 hamluis

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 06:17 PM

It's not that we love Newegg or hate Newegg (although there is a discount for forum members, I believe).

It's plain and simple supply and demand.

There are two vendors (Newegg and Tiger Direct) that offer a larger supply of computer components than just about any other source...cheaper, more current, deeper.

For those who also want to go shopping at www.pricewatch (where you can occasionally find better pricing on certain objects) or who want to use the www.bizrate site...I suggest doing so. But most don't want to expend that much time/energy checking prices and specs at various websites.

The only negative recommendation I would make: Don't buy computers or computer parts on eBay (unless you are an experienced shopper/technician).

Louis

Edited by hamluis, 23 February 2009 - 06:19 PM.


#11 Vaerli

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 06:56 PM

Wow thanks for the replies guys...love the people here...and you all love NewEgg i see Lol.

--
boopme
I posted this and then saw the other area which was this and went ahead and posted here realizing my mistake...i couldnt delete my other post so i just left it.


well, i like newegg because it allows easy sorting for what i want, its got a large selection, and good prices. The layout is what draws me in the most.

Its also my fault for posting in the other duplicate thread, because i should have noticed it was a double post. Sorry, i just wasn't looking around much in the board.

Q6600, 4GB g-skill, 8800GT, P5N-D motherboard
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