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Trying to save Data from Dead computer


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#1 jtr327

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 02:30 AM

Hi, today my computer just frooze. So I powered it off but now I am having the same kind of problems as some people on this board. The computer comes on(blue power light is on), fans start going, BUT no beeps and no processor light flickering, no response from keyboard, no signal reaching the monitor (so just blank monitor), no logo screen, NADA.

-Took out the small battery to reset the cmos setting
-took out vid card, ram, sound card and replaced all<<there was no crazy beeping from the mobo

-So I am guessing it might be mobo failure, but I don't see any thing on the exterior of circuitry
-or could be power but the computer does come on, with the fans as well....
-or psu

Specs: don't know which you need but these are from outside the comp

sony vaio pcv-rs620g desktop
around 4 years old?
windows home xp edition
intel pentium 4 processor
psu speed 3ghz
800MHz FSB, 1MBL2 cache
512 mb 400Mhz DDR
ATI radeon 9200 128MB


I guess I would just like to know what the problem is and if it is easier to fix/replace or just buy a whole new comp?
But I would like to keep my data if this comp is just Dead

Sony support is CRAP


Any kind of suggestions are welcomed
thank you for time and support in advanced!

Edited by jtr327, 21 February 2009 - 02:34 AM.


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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 02:58 AM

if you plan on buying a new computer, and providing your hard drive is fine, all you should have to do when you get your new one is remove the hard drive from your old one and slave it in to the new one, pull off the files you want, and then reformat it.

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#3 dc3

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 11:57 AM

If you have the installation disk see if you can use the Recovery Console to run chkdsk /r. If you can boot from the CD this is a strong indication that this is a software problem or the hdd.

Note: You may need to change the boot order in the BIOS so that the CD-ROM is the first device in the boot order to be able to boot from the Windows installation disk.

To run the Recovery Console from the Windows XP startup disks or the Windows XP CD-ROM, follow these steps:

1. Insert the Windows XP startup disk into the floppy disk drive, or insert the Windows XP CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive, and then restart the computer.

Click to select any options that are required to start the computer from the CD-ROM drive if you are prompted.

2. When the "Welcome to Setup" screen appears, press R to start the Recovery Console.

3. If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot computer, select the installation that you must access from the]Recovery Console.

4. When you are prompted, type the Administrator password. If the administrator password is blank, just press ENTER.

5. At the command prompt, type chkdsk /r , and then press ENTER.

6. To exit the Recovery Console and restart the computer, type exit at the command prompt, and then press ENTER.

Edited by dc3, 21 February 2009 - 11:59 AM.

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#4 fairjoeblue

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 01:23 PM

If you push the power button & get nothing on the monitor, no display, period, the likely suspects are the motherboard & power suppy .
If you have an "add-in" video card it would also be suspect.

A computer should come on & show a logo , post screen, or error message if the hard drive or operating system is bad.
A motherboard can [and usually does] fail without any visible signs of failure on the actual motherboard.

The only real way to know exactly what has failed is to test stuff.
If you have a add-in video card & it has onboard video also, remove the add-in video card .
Try it with the onboard video.

The next test I would do requires having a know good "spare" power supply .
The test would be to simply hook another power supply to it & see if it comes on.
[A power supply can appear to come on & still be bad]

Some people suggest testing a power supply with a multimeter to see if the output is correct.
That will detect some really bad power supplies but the test can be misleading.
Testing using that method only gives a reading for power when the power supply has no load on it.
When a computer start it is usually under the heaviest load & takes more to initilize & startup everything.

You could try opening t5he computer & disconnecting everything that isn't neccessary for the computer to come on & try it
[Disconnect everything except the actual motherboard connections from the power supply]

If you buy a new computer & want to "rescue" foles off of the hard drive in the old computer things have changed a bit!
A lot of new computers come with SATA hard drives.
That means you can no longer "slave" a IDE hard droive to the "Master" in the new computer to get the files off of it.
The work around is simple !
Most will come with a IDE CD drive. [burner].
Simply unplug the CD drive & connect the IDE "ribbon" cable & power lead to the old hard drive.
[leave the old hard drive set as Master]

You can not save any "installed" programs/applications .
[Office, Photo shop, etc,]
All you can save & use from the3 old drive is personal folders/files, music, pictures, videos [movies] .
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#5 jtr327

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 07:18 PM

thanks for all your input

fairjoeblue: yes I also think it is a failure of a major component<<<<argh

-About the add in vid card? I am not quite sure if I have that. The vid card in the comp is the one that came with it installed, never upgraded

-Spare power supply= I have another desktop (Dell) just bought it works fine, is it possible to use that (or should I just not even mess with that)

-I disconnected everything except vid card, and supposedly when the comp turns on it should make crazy beeping noises but it did not do that. So is it mobo or psu?

-In your opinion, Should I try to replace these parts or buy a new comp? And do you have any recommendations. After this I cannot buy another SONY, its riduculous

Thank you again for your time and information

#6 fairjoeblue

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 07:37 PM

Unless BOTH are Dell don't use the Dell power supply.
Most Dell PSU's are "Proprietary" .

To know if you have a "add-in" video card look at where the monitor attaches to the computer.
If it plugs in by the other connectors it is "onboard" [built in]
If it connects below to a card in one of the slot openings it is "add-in" .

If it is a assin card it can be removed & the monitor hooked to the onboard, provided there is a onboard connector.

As for fixing vs buying, If you are able to repair it yourself, or know somebody that can, you may be better off with a new unit.
A shop will cost enough for repairs [if the motherboard is bad] that you can probably add a few $ to it & get a new computer.

I don't recommend computers as if a person happens to get a lemon & I recommended that particular unit I'd feel responsable.

Edited by fairjoeblue, 21 February 2009 - 07:52 PM.

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#7 dc3

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 03:20 AM

fairjoeblue, if the peripheral devices are plugged in when you test the rail voltages there is a load on the PSU, and it is true that Dell did use proprietorial PSUs at one time but moved away from these. If you have any question as to whether this is a ATX PSU simply google the model of the Dell and add ATX PSU.

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