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Connectivity Problems


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#1 Cirdan

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 02:11 PM

I had some problems sharing (files & printer) on the LAN which I have been using for years with no major problems. Some details were posted in another forum on this site. (Perhaps these topics can be merged.)

I have recently purchased a used Sony VAIO V505DC1P notebook and a used wireless Belkin 54g router model F5D 7230-4 version 7001. I have set up the router and was able to hook two of the desktops to the router with no problems: both now have internet access through the router and can share resources through the router.

The ethernet connection to the third desktop and both connections to the notebook (wired and wireless) show limited or no connectivity. Belkin support indicates that the problem is with the network adapters, but, following troubleshooting steps provided by Sony on the VAIO notebook lead to no solution.

I have additional information about what I have tried and I will be glad to provide it, if needed.

I am hoping that fresh eyes and a new tack will lead to resolution of the connectivity problems and am ready to follow the steps required.

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#2 doresy

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 03:46 PM

Novice here.......could it be a firewall issue? Are all the ip address set as trusted?
Windows XP Home....Netgear DG834G wireless modem/router....ISP- AOL.

#3 Cirdan

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 04:50 PM

OK. Let's start with the firewalls. On the firewall of the desktop that will not connect, the router IP address is set as trusted.

Before I went into the other room to check the firewall settings on that nonconnecting desktop, I viewed the computers in the workgroup that I had established for the Belkin router. Wonder of wonders,-- the nonconnecting desktop was in the list, and,... I was able to do a file transfer to another desktop. (This is after two days of not seeing that computer in the workgroup.) I had done nothing that I hadn't done before, things like disconnect all of the ethernet cables from the router so that I could hook internet directly to the notebook, then reseat all the cables,...

From the now partially connected desktop, I can ping the router, but not an address on the internet.

As for the notebook, there is only Windows XP Pro firewall. With the firewall off, I tried to connect to the LAN wirelessly and got an error when the notebook was acquiring a network address. (That is where the process has been timing out.) The result: limited or no connectivity once again.

Edited by ragergle, 15 February 2009 - 04:51 PM.


#4 Desion

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 06:03 PM

OK. Let's start with the firewalls. On the firewall of the desktop that will not connect, the router IP address is set as trusted.

Before I went into the other room to check the firewall settings on that nonconnecting desktop, I viewed the computers in the workgroup that I had established for the Belkin router. Wonder of wonders,-- the nonconnecting desktop was in the list, and,... I was able to do a file transfer to another desktop. (This is after two days of not seeing that computer in the workgroup.) I had done nothing that I hadn't done before, things like disconnect all of the ethernet cables from the router so that I could hook internet directly to the notebook, then reseat all the cables,...

From the now partially connected desktop, I can ping the router, but not an address on the internet.

As for the notebook, there is only Windows XP Pro firewall. With the firewall off, I tried to connect to the LAN wirelessly and got an error when the notebook was acquiring a network address. (That is where the process has been timing out.) The result: limited or no connectivity once again.


It appears you may be having problems with your DHCP and DNS servers.
  • Your DHCP server is responsible for automatically assigning you a IP address, Subnet Mask, and Default gate based on your settings from your router.
  • Your DNS server is basically responsible for connecting you to the internet, which is usually assigned by your ISP (such as Hughesnet, Roadrunner, etc).

Proceed with the following steps to began troubleshooting your problems:

Troubleshoot DHCP server - Set a static IP address
1. Do the following steps: Goto Start>Control Panel>Classic View>Network Connections
2. In the network connections screen, find the LAN connection you are using to connect to internet through.
3. Right click that connection, and select properties. In the properties window, use the scroll down (if needed) and select "Internet Protocol TCP\IP".
4. Once TCP\IP is selected, click Properties below it. Check "use the following ip address" (the text boxes should be enabled).
5. Type your ROUTER IP Address in the default gateway text box (usually its 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1, by default)
6. For the IP Address text box, type a compatible IP. For example, for a router with a ip address 192.168.1.1, use an ip address of 192.168.1.[2 or higher].
7. Click in the subnet mask text box, it should be automatically completed now, if nothing is displayed when you click it, try typing 255.255.255.0.
8. Proceed to step 9 (do not exit the properties window yet)


Troubleshoot DNS server - Set a static DNS server address
NOTE:You need to know what your DNS server addresses are, if not contact your ISP for them.
9. Make sure you completed steps 1-7 above, and you should still be in the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) properties window.
10. In the preferred DNS server text box, type the address that applies to you. For example, 67.676.676.67
11. In the secondary DNS server text box, type the other addesss that applies to you. For example, 76.767.767.76.
12. Click OK twice


After doing the above steps in order, you should beable to connect to the internet sucessfully without any disruptions. If you still have problems, check your ethernet cables are securely connected. Please let me know of your results. :thumbsup:
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#5 Cirdan

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 09:16 PM

On my desktop, I found that the DHCP settings were already static, that the computer was correctly named, and that the router address was correct (192.168.2.1 with subnet mask 255.255.255.0). I found that the DNS server primary address was set to 4.2.2.1 and the secondary to 4.2.2.2.

My ISP, however, said that there was no static address for their servers. This explains to me why I could join the workgroup and could share files, yet not connect to the internet and view web pages.

I surmise that the static addresses had been set by Cisco's Network Magic, a program I downloaded and installed on all three desktop computers. Anyway, I uninstalled Network Magic on this desktop, set the DHCP and DNS to "find automatically", then rebooted the computer. Everything came up right on the desktop!

Next, I went to the notebook and found that the DHCP was set to static address 192.168.2.1 with subnet mask 255.255.255.0 and the DNS primary and secondary addresses were blank. I set DHCP to "find automatically", enabled the Windows firewall, turned off the wireless LAN, hooked up an ethernet cable and rebooted. After running the network wizard (again) and enabling the LAN connection, I was up and running. Now I am updating the AVG antivirus and Windows is performing automatic updates.

I know what I want to put on the notebook: Mozilla Firefox browser, Thunderbird mail program, Spybot, and Online Armor firewall,... But, before I get too carried away, I would like to save the current state of my newly acquired notebook. Do you have a recommendation on how to do so? For example, Do you know of free programs that will capture the state and burn onto a DVD?

I'm thinking that I would like to get what I can from the internet while I actually have access, then go about testing the wireless connection, or is it safe to test the wireless connection now?

Thank you so much for your help so far. I could not have done it without you!!!

#6 Desion

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 10:56 PM

...............................[skipped]...............................

I know what I want to put on the notebook: Mozilla Firefox browser, Thunderbird mail program, Spybot, and Online Armor firewall,... But, before I get too carried away, I would like to save the current state of my newly acquired notebook. Do you have a recommendation on how to do so? For example, Do you know of free programs that will capture the state and burn onto a DVD?

I'm thinking that I would like to get what I can from the internet while I actually have access, then go about testing the wireless connection, or is it safe to test the wireless connection now?

Thank you so much for your help so far. I could not have done it without you!!!



If i understand correctly, you want to create a restore point for your computer, so that in the future you may always go back to that current state it was at. This can be done using the windows utility, System Restore.

Use the following steps to create a restore point:
1. Open System Restore
Start>All Programs>Accessories>System Tools>System Restore
2. Click the "Create a restore point" option, select next.
3. Type a description for your restore point.
Note:Its best to use a detailed description so that you know which restore point you wish to return to in the future. (Example, "Installed AIM 2/15/09")
4. Finally, click create.
A system restore point will then be created, allowing you to restore to it in the future, if needed.

If your planning on creating alot of restore point(s) in your computer, it would be best to take the following action to allow more disk space for System Restore:
1. Open System Restore
Start>All Programs>Accessories>System Tools>System Restore
2. In the left pane of the System Restore window, click "System Restore Settings"
System Properties Dialog box will appear.
3. Click the drive you will be using system restore on, most likely your local disk (C:).
NOTE:It is recommended that you keep system restore kept "On" for all drives, unless stated otherwise.
4. Select settings, adjust the Lever based on your personal needs. Increase it to allow even more system restore points on your computer at a time.
5. Click "Ok" twice.


And for your question about the wireless connection, it is only as safe as you make it. But, certainly create a system restore point before messing with your connections. Also note, in the event your system restore point cannot be restored, it would be to your advantage to keep regular backups of your pc on an external hard drive, DVD, or other storage device. If you would wish to create a backup of your PC, use the following procedures:

Creating a Backup
1. Insert the storage device you wish to use for creating backup on. Do this First.
2. Open the Backup utility
Start>All Programs>Accessories>System Tools>Backup
This will open the Back or Restore Wizard.

3. Click next, choose "Back up files and settings"
4. Choose whichever backup type you want. In our case, full system backup would be preferred.
5. Choose the save location to be stored on storage device, and choose a well-descriptive name.
6. Click Next and continue following the prompts until finished backing up.


I hope this guide helped you, feel free to ask whatever questions may arise.
Desion
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#7 Cirdan

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 11:47 PM

I was actually looking for something more than system restore. System restore points go away over time, because only so many are held in storage. I have a clean computer now-- just the OS, drivers, and a couple of useful programs, so I am going to do a full backup using the Acronis True Image software I found on eBay for just $32. Should work great.

Also, after disabling the ethernet LAN, I was able to connect to the Wireless LAN with no problem.

Thank you so much for your help, Desion. It is a credit to your insight that I was able to resolve my connectivity issues so quickly. You identified the problem right out of the gate!! I can't thank you enough.

Edited by ragergle, 16 February 2009 - 01:59 AM.


#8 Desion

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 12:42 PM

your welcome

Edited by Desion, 16 February 2009 - 01:09 PM.

Interesting Links:
Softpedia - Online downloads encyclopedia
W3Schools - Website Programming Tutorials
PC World - Everything about technology
Wikipedia - Online Encyclopedia
Photobucket - Free Image Hosting

"I don't support network bridges, they support me."




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