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Running two antiviruses?


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13 replies to this topic

#1 funnytim

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 04:22 AM

Hey all,

Currently I'm using avast! free edition antivirus on my computer. Because of the lack of ability to schedule scans, I'm thinking maybe I should get a antivirus program that can do this, so I can run scans weekly at night when i'm not using the computer, etc.

I understand that I shouldn't have two antivirus programs running, as the real-time scanning may conflict. However, if I get a on-demand only scanner (which can schedule tasks in my case), such as http://www.bitdefender.com/PRODUCT-14-en--...ee-Edition.html , would that be 'OK'?


I've also used Antivir before, but don't like the ads that pop up each time I update.


Thanks!

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#2 Aqibkhan

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 08:20 AM

Spybot search & destroy is a good program to delete viruses before i has lots of pop up and with spybot search & destroy you can delete viruses and malware ect

#3 JamesFrance

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 10:28 AM

MOD EDIT HERE....

Many would say that even installing 2 avs can cause problems. I have used Avira free without installing the guard alongside Comodo av when it first came out as beta. I and others didn't notice any problems with that, although I now only use Comodo Internet Security. None of the antivirus or anti-spyware programs have ever found anything on the computer I am posting this with, which has had Comodo firewall with Defense+ installed since I removed Norton on the day it arrived.

Edited by usasma, 09 February 2009 - 08:25 AM.
Removed EULA violation

James

#4 danjmilos

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 02:49 PM

Avast Home can be set up to scan whenever your screensaver activates and will scan. Go to your screensaver and make it avast anti-virus and your set.

#5 Queen-Evie

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 07:50 PM

Spybot search & destroy is a good program to delete viruses before i has lots of pop up and with spybot search & destroy you can delete viruses and malware ect


Spybot is not meant to catch viruses. It's for spyware-which is different from viruses.
It may catch a limited number of viruses or keyloggers, but don't depend on it for virus detection.
Use a good antivirus program in addition to whatever malware scanners you use.

#6 danjmilos

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 09:49 PM

funnytim,
Make sure you go to www.avast.com and read or download the pdf for avast home free, there is a lot of information about the anti-virus program that can help you make decisions about what you can do.

#7 jgweed

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 08:34 AM

With all the free, on-line AV scans available, having more than one resident AV is not really needed, even if you are extremely careful to have only one providing real-time AV protection. Not only to you need to keep both definitions current, but you must carefully review the candidates after a scan to be sure you are not deleting the other AV's definition files that it found.
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#8 brianpog

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 09:02 AM

Its more adviceable to use only 1 antivirus , putting 2 antivirus at a time will cause conflict and eventually issues with your computer. I use Mcafee , for free anti-virus I use AVG

#9 quietman7

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 02:44 PM

The primary concern with using more than one anti-virus program is due to conflicts that can arise when they are running in real-time mode simultaneously. However, even when one of them is disabled for use as a stand-alone scanner, it can affect the other. Anti-virus software components insert themselves into the operating systems core and using more than one can cause instability, crash your computer, slow performance and waste system resources. When actively running in the background while connected to the Internet, they both may try to update their definition databases at the same time. As the programs compete for resources required to download the necessary files this often can result in sluggish system performance or unresponsive behavior.

Each anti-virus will often interpret the activity of the other as a virus and there is a greater chance of them alerting you to a "False Positive". If one finds a virus and then the other also finds the same virus, both programs will be competing over exclusive rights on dealing with that virus. Each anti-virus will attempt to remove the offending file and quarantine it. If one finds and quarantines the file before the other one does, then you encounter the problem of both wanting to scan each other's zipped or archived files and each reporting the other's quarantined contents. This can lead to a repetitive cycle of endless alerts that continually warn you that a virus has been found when that is not the case.

Anti-virus scanners use virus definitions to check for viruses and these can include a fragment of the virus code which may be recognized by other anti-virus programs as the virus itself. Because of this, most anti-virus programs encrypt their definitions so that they do not trigger a false alarm when scanned by other security programs. However, some anti-virus vendors do not encrypt their definitions and will trigger false alarms if used while another resident anti-virus program is active.

To avoid these problems, use only one anti-virus solution.
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#10 funnytim

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 07:16 PM

Thanks everyone. I'll stick with only one anti-virus.

Because the free version of avast! doesn't support scheduling, I've downloaded a trial version of the professional edition, which is supposed to be able to schedule scans at a specified time. While I'm able to find that option, I can't see to find something which would make it shutdown the computer when the scan is finished. Does anyone know how to do that?

Thanks again.

#11 crzyallday0514

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 07:23 PM

:thumbsup: Everytime I come to this site I realize just how much I don't know. Learned recently about dangers of running 2 AV programs. Disabled one and was planning on running one continuously and using the other for a weekly scan. But, now after reading this topic find out that even having 2 on my system might be a problem even if 1 is disabled. I have McAfee for free through my cable co. I just recently installed Avast 4.8 Home Edition and it caught something that McAfee didn't. Plus the fact that McAfee doesn't let you know about everything it does, find it very confusing to learn (and I confuse easily), & someone told me it's a resource hog. Don't really understand how you tell if a program is a resource hog but it sure doesn't sound good. Would prefer just to use Avast and go to McAfee's site to find out how to uninstall it. Anybody have some advice or suggestions?

#12 boopme

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 08:00 PM

Hi Andrew, Resource hogs can cause an entire computer system to operate more slowly and experience system crashes more often by useing most of the memory, data, or other processes. I prefer Avira myself.
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#13 quietman7

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 10:41 PM

Choosing an anti-virus is a matter of personal preference, your technical ability and experience, features offered, the amount of resources utilized, how it may affect system performance and what will work best for your system. A particular anti-virus that works well for one person may not work as well for another. You may need to experiment and find the one most suitable for your use. Another factor to consider is whether you want to use a paid for product or free alternative.
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#14 Kevin Lee

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 11:38 PM

Personally, I use A^2 Antivirus and McAfee Security Center, and it seems to work just fine.




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