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XP and Vista at THE SAME TIME


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#1 patbox

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 05:28 PM

I am quite not an expert. I run a pc with XP. My question is can I keep my XP and still install Windows 7? Like keep XP on the C and istall 7 on the D drive? and then book 7 or XP based some options? Does anybody have experience with this? Patbox
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#2 usasma

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 06:34 PM

Yes, as long as you isolate each OS on it's own partition it should be just fine.

I upgraded a 64 bit Vista Ultimate installation to Win7, then installed Vista Ultimate on the second partition without any issues.
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#3 patbox

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 06:38 PM

and how do I actually do that? install stuff on different partitions, and how do I tell the system which partition to boot? thanks a lot
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#4 usasma

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 06:53 PM

You first have to determine if you've got room for 2 OS's on your current hard drive(s). Use the Disk Management tool to check that.
Then, when you install WIN7, be very careful to ensure that you're putting it on it's own partition - and that it's not going on the XP partition.

If all goes well, you'll be able to choose which OS to boot from as the OS begins to boot. If not, make sure that you have access to the internet on another system. Testing beta software is riskly - it doesn't always work the way that it should.

Be sure to backup anything important also - you never know when a glitch can erase everything (or make it unbootable).
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#5 czhang

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 07:16 AM

patbox: I think you should allocate at least 30 GB each for XP and Windows 7. The minimum could be lower (like about 20 GB), but I allocated 80 GB for XP pro and 100 GB for 7 Beta 64 bit ultimate.

The disk management tool referred to in the previous post is a partition manager to be more specific. I use 7 Tools Partition Manager, which can partition the disk, make raw copy (/clone) of a hard drive (including the OS and all installed programs and data), and many other functions. It costs about $30: http://www.brothersoft.com/7tools-partitio...ager-23227.html. There is a trial version of this software: http://www.soft32.com/download_227515.html. If you don't want to keep it, you can just use it to partition your disk and then after the trial period is over, uninstall it.

I suppose you already have XP installed. Then you can create a partition of adequate size, and install Windows 7 Beta on the new partition. Windows 7 Beta should detect your original OS. Then when the computer is restarted, it will give you a choice to boot into either "Earlier version of Windows" or "Windows 7".

Edited by czhang, 07 February 2009 - 07:17 AM.


#6 thedon57

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 07:14 AM

Yes I did the above annd when you first start up you are asked which system you would like to use.
Like mine comes up Vista Home Premium or Windows 7, I just press enter on whatever one I want to use, and away it goes.
Now installed Microsoft Security Essencials on my Tower with Windows Home Premium 32bit and Toshiba Satellite Pro Laptop with Windows Home Premium 64bit

#7 patbox

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 02:45 AM

Well, I would not like to put my XP instalation into danger by doing something wrong. Could I install the Win 7 on the D: drive? I have plenty of room on D: drive.

Btw. What are particions? :thumbsup:

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#8 czhang

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 03:55 AM

If a hard drive is a house, then a partition is one of the rooms in the house. You will need to use a partition manager to create more than one partition on a physical hard drive (see my previous post for a partition manager that you can use).

If you have a separate D: (whether it is a different hard drive than C: or a different partition but on the same hard drive with C:), then you should be able to select it to install Win 7. But please make sure that you don't have anything that you can't lose on D: drive. If you have important data on D: drive, backup the data first before you start installing Win 7 on it.

#9 patbox

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 04:31 AM

Ok that should do. Finally, do you know where I could download this windows 7?

If I understand it correctly I just download win 7 and install it on d drive and that will do? Or do I still need to particion d drive? (or is the d drive already the partition)

btw. if everything goes right, i should not loose my d drive data in cas there is enough space? or if everything goes right I will loose all the data? would it be safe to move the data from d drive to c drive for the time beiing?
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#10 czhang

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 05:06 AM

I am sorry to inform you that it is now too late to download Windows 7 Beta, i.e., Win 7 Beta is no longer available for download. The download period officially ended on Feb. 10, 2009. I thought you had downloaded Win 7 Beta and made an installation disk.

One addition to my previous post: The D: will have to be a primary partition to install an OS.

If you install an OS on D:, it will erase everything on it, i.e., you will lose data if you don't backup the data first, even if you have lots and lots of space on D:.

Edited by czhang, 14 February 2009 - 05:11 AM.


#11 patbox

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 05:22 AM

Oh sorry to hear that I cant install Win 7 anymore. At least now I do not have to worry about messing it up :-) But I could say, can I install Linux on my PC at the same time as windows (just kidding) :thumbsup:
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#12 czhang

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 11:41 AM

Yes, you can install Linux alongside Windows OS(es). But later updates of MS OS(es) might mess up GRUB and make your system unbootable. I heard that GRUB can be repaired and your system will become bootable again, but I don't know how to do that yet. So I would not recommend installing Linux on the same drive as Windows OS(es), and when you do install Linux, make sure that you install it on a separate and isolated hard drive (i.e., do not connect another hard drive at the same time when you install Linux on one hard drive).

Edited by czhang, 14 February 2009 - 11:42 AM.


#13 Chappy333

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 10:45 PM

Hi Pat

Before you do anything with dual booting, now or in the future, we need to know if this is a home built or a purchased machine like HP?
If it's the latter, your D: drive is most likely your Recovery partition and should NOT be touched! If you delete that partition and it is the OEM recovery partition, you will not be able to restore your current XP install back to it's factory state.
I would tend to think that this is the case for you here, so I recommend learning more about this before you attempt it, especially about your Recovery partition and what it means.
Allot of folks here can help with that so just ask away whenever you need help

Dave

#14 patbox

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 05:49 PM

Hi Pat

Before you do anything with dual booting, now or in the future, we need to know if this is a home built or a purchased machine like HP?
If it's the latter, your D: drive is most likely your Recovery partition and should NOT be touched! If you delete that partition and it is the OEM recovery partition, you will not be able to restore your current XP install back to it's factory state.
I would tend to think that this is the case for you here, so I recommend learning more about this before you attempt it, especially about your Recovery partition and what it means.
Allot of folks here can help with that so just ask away whenever you need help

Dave


Hi Dave, it sounds more complicated that I realized. I better don't touch it and stick which my XP (which I found is quite a good operating system). I still don't know exactly what is a partition and why is it so special...
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#15 usasma

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 06:56 PM

A partition is just a section of your hard drive. In general you can only have 4 partitions on a drive. Each partition will be assigned a drive letter (this is where the confusion sets in) once it's formatted (and recognized by the Operating System).

The computer boots and looks for the Master Boot Record (MBR) on the hard drive. The MBR does a bit of stuff, then it looks for information in the boot sectors of each partition. When it finds the one that's bootable, it boots from that. So, without partitions, your system wouldn't boot!
My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.




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