Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

sl7e4 processor running at 203 degrees..normal is around 140


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Johnny Boy

Johnny Boy

  • Members
  • 182 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Island
  • Local time:02:02 PM

Posted 31 January 2009 - 02:03 PM

my sl7e4 processor usually runs at an idle temp of about 140F(60C)...and last night the computer shut off while i was sleeping, and when i went to turn it back on, it would boot for a few seconds and before the moniter would come on, it would shut down again. My motherboard was made to overclock(which i havent done but)...so if any vital components reach high temps, it shuts the computer down. and so i opened the case to chekc out if anything as overheating, and i could immediately feel the heat. Anyway, igot my comptuer booted and and using Everest Ultimate Edition, its now runnning between 196F(91C) and 210(98C)...This is with my fans on full(the idle temperature i gave you before, was with fans on half speed)..Anyway i was wondering if anyone could help me out and tell me whats going on, my rig is in my signature...im not sure what information you guys might need, that would be pertanent to fixing this but let me know and i will provide it.
Posted Image
Staples Easytech Associate
Staples Certified Onsite PC Technician
Computer Science Major, Stonybrook University

Society leans heavily on computers. If you have the power to take out computers, you have the power to take out society.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 31 January 2009 - 02:25 PM

This is normal. Most processors have a max temperature of 100 degrees Celsius.

#3 Johnny Boy

Johnny Boy
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 182 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Island

Posted 31 January 2009 - 02:57 PM

if it was normal, the processor would have always been like this..the 5 months i have had it..not just out of nowhere one day..its not normal. no processor should be that hot under IDLE temperatures with more than adequate circulation.
Posted Image
Staples Easytech Associate
Staples Certified Onsite PC Technician
Computer Science Major, Stonybrook University

Society leans heavily on computers. If you have the power to take out computers, you have the power to take out society.

#4 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 31 January 2009 - 03:07 PM

Idle temperature or not, Processors are allowed to heat up to 100`C

I've known quite a few I serviced, being 478 pinned, and they were up to 92`C and the other one was 101`C. I just recommended a new fan, one for a gaming board to be installed. This means that you need more cooling.

#5 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,758 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:02:02 PM

Posted 31 January 2009 - 03:49 PM

JB: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/143/6

I would remove the heatsink and try a new application of thermal compound, if that fan appears to be turning properly.

If not, I would replace the two, adding a new application of thermal compound.

Louis

#6 Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

Guest_Jay-P VIP_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 31 January 2009 - 04:14 PM

Here is a better solution, therefore adding to hamluis's post:

5.3 Heat Sink Solutions
One method of improving thermal performance is to increase the surface area of a device by attaching a metallic
heat sink. To maximize the heat transfer, the thermal resistance from the heat sink to the air can be reduced by
maximizing the airflow through the heat sink fins as well as by maximizing the surface area of the heat sink itself.
5.4 Pentium 4 processor Reference Heat Sink
Intel is enabling a reference heat sink for the Pentium® 4 processor. This active heat sink design includes a 60 mm
fan and is designed assuming a TLA of 45ºC and sufficient cross flow to maintain the local ambient temperature.
In order to maximize longevity, a heat sink consisting of folded aluminum fins brazed to a copper base has been
designed. The copper base provides increased heat spreading and the folded fins provide greater surface area for
thermal dissipation.
5.4.1 Heat Sink Weight
The heat sink attachment requires a retention mechanism. Heat sinks that attach to the reference retention
mechanism should not exceed 450 grams. These are the design limits for the motherboard components, heat sink
retention mechanism, heat sink attach clips, and 423 pin socket to withstand mechanical shock and vibration.
The test limits for vibration are 10min/axis, 3 axes over a frequency range of 5Hz to 500Hz. This results in a Power
Spectral Density (PSD) of 3.13g RMS. The system level shock design limits are 30G trapezoidal, 11 ms duration,
170 in./sec minimum velocity change applied 3 times in the + and – directions in each of 3 perpendicular axes.


This is referenced here at Intel.com

#7 Johnny Boy

Johnny Boy
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 182 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Island

Posted 31 January 2009 - 11:09 PM

yeah i get what your saying, that it CAN...but i mean...its never been like this..and i can feel the comptuer slowing down because of the heat....i applied di-electric grease(which supposably is the same as thermal grease....but i will clean it off, and re apply when the arctic silver comes in)
Posted Image
Staples Easytech Associate
Staples Certified Onsite PC Technician
Computer Science Major, Stonybrook University

Society leans heavily on computers. If you have the power to take out computers, you have the power to take out society.

#8 Johnny Boy

Johnny Boy
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 182 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Island
  • Local time:01:02 PM

Posted 01 February 2009 - 03:02 PM

and, the di electric grease brought me down to where i should be.
Posted Image
Staples Easytech Associate
Staples Certified Onsite PC Technician
Computer Science Major, Stonybrook University

Society leans heavily on computers. If you have the power to take out computers, you have the power to take out society.

#9 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,758 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX

Posted 01 February 2009 - 03:40 PM

FWIW: I don't see anywhere that dielectric grease...is assumed to be equal to thermal compound in function. I think I'd use thermal compound for thermal compound functions...and dielectric grease for dielectric grease functions. One appears to be a thermal conductive agent...while the other appears to be a moisture sealant.

For the dollars involved, I think I would go with the normal recommended solution.

http://www.dansdata.com/goop.htm

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=d...mp;aq=f&oq=

Louis




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users