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Fatal Exception - Windows 98 SE


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#1 MrHyDe

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 12:25 AM

Argh! I am oh so tired of my computer not working. I have tried reformatting and reinstalling windows...I've even tried a different hard drive and that doesnt work. Basically if windows 98 (se) does install, after about a minute or two, during my "re-setting up" of the computer I get this message on a blue screen:

Windows

A fatal exception OE has occurred at 0167:BFF76FB3. The current
application will be terminated.


Im basically forced to restart my computer and I wont be able to get it into windows again unless I use safe mode...pretty much it will either A - act like its going to load windows and then remain on a blank screen with the blinking line in the top left corner, B - get to the blank screen and then restart its self, C - tell me that there was a windows protection error and my computer must be restarted or D - get past the blank screen and load up the blue screen error again.
I havent taken notice of whether the numbers on the blue screen error change because ive just been so frustrated it isnt working and only just wrote it down on the last attempt.

Oh also...several times during my reinstallation attempts of windows 98 I've gotten a msg saying that "msgsrv32 has performed an illegal operation". This would occur usually after the first restart that windows 98 se does during installation. I managed to install windows 98 without getting that error but now im just getting blue screen errors...previously there was a combination of both errors.

HELP!!! I am soo bloody tired of not having my computer work.

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#2 tg1911

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 01:07 AM

See if this might help:
Bad RAM Causes Fatal Exception Errors Running Windows 95/98
MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P, CPU: Phenom II X4 955 Deneb BE, HS/F: CoolerMaster V8, RAM: 2 x 1G Kingston HyperX DDR2 800, VGA: ECS GeForce Black GTX 560, PSU: Antec TruePower Modular 750W, Soundcard: Asus Xonar D1, Case: CoolerMaster COSMOS 1000, Storage: Internal - 2 x Seagate 250GB SATA, 2 x WD 1TB SATA; External - Seagate 500GB USB, WD 640GB eSATA, 3 x WD 1TB eSATA

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#3 MrHyDe

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 06:23 PM

Sorry but what does that site say cause this stupid old computer isnt opening the page. Its almost as useless as my actual computer at the moment.

#4 tg1911

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 07:57 PM

It's a Microsoft Knowledge Base article:

This article was previously published under Q138788

If this article does not describe the error message that you are receiving, view the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article to view more articles that describe error messages:

315854 Windows 98 and Windows Me Error Message Resource Center

If this article does not describe your hardware-related issue, please see the following Microsoft Web site to view more articles about hardware:

http://support.microsoft.com/support/windo.../hwddresctr.asp

On this page
SYMPTOMS
CAUSE
RESOLUTION
MORE INFORMATION
APPLIES T0

SYMPTOMS
Windows reports a random "Fatal Exception 0x has occurred at xxxx:xxxxxxx" error message even though your previous version of Windows or Windows for Workgroups did not.

CAUSE
A common cause for this error messages is faulty physical memory (RAM) on the computer. The following are reasons why your previous version of Windows may appear to run smoothly while Windows may report a random "Fatal Exception 0x has occurred at xxxx:xxxxxxx" error message:

•All operating systems use memory differently. In Windows 3.1, the "bad" memory may be used for holding rarely used data. In Windows, the "bad" memory is used for holding frequently run program information.

•Windows 3.1 contains comparatively little 32-bit code. Windows uses much more 32-bit code. Furthermore, there are subtle differences between the way memory is accessed if it is being accessed for code or if it being accessed for data. Because Windows runs much more 32-bit code, these subtle errors show up more often.

In particular, all the 32-bit code in Windows 3.1 resides in one place: at the low-end of physical memory. If the first 4 megabytes (MB) of memory can handle 32-bit code, Windows 3.1 works without errors. This is true even if the topmost physical memory cannot run 32-bit code because Windows 3.1 does not run 32-bit code outside the first 4 MB of RAM.

Windows runs 32-bit code in all portions of memory. Therefore, when Windows runs 32-bit code in a section of RAM that cannot run 32-bit code well, you may receive "Fatal Exception Error 0x:xxxxxxxx" error messages.

•Windows interacts with hardware differently than previous versions of Windows. This is due partly to Plug and Play and partly to new drivers that take advantage of the additional capabilities of interface adapters. These features may uncover anomalies in the hardware that never appeared in previous versions of Windows because earlier versions did not attempt to exploit these features.

•Many new computers do not have memory chips that perform parity checking; therefore, you may have been encountering parity errors in Windows 3.1 without realizing it because the errors were in relatively harmless sections of memory. For example, in a Microsoft Word for Windows document, the word "the" is changed to "tie."

RESOLUTION
To resolve these errors, it is often necessary to replace the RAM and/or system board (motherboard). In some circumstances it may be possible to alter CMOS settings, such as Memory Wait States, to run Windows successfully. In other cases, disabling the motherboard L2 cache allows Windows to run. For information about how to edit CMOS settings, please view your computer documentation or contact your hardware manufacturer.

For additional information about how to identify if your issue is faulty RAM, click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

181862Specifying Amount of RAM Available to Windows Using MaxPhysPage

134503Parity Error Messages May Indicate Bad Memory

Note that you may want to restart Windows in Safe mode to see if the errors persist. If they do not, the problem may be a software or driver problem, in which case the information above may not apply. For additional information about how to troubleshoot fatal exception errors, click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

192926 How to Perform Clean-Boot Troubleshooting for Windows 98

156126 Troubleshooting Windows 95 Using Safe Mode

MORE INFORMATION
Fatal exception errors are similar to EMM386 exception errors. For example, fatal exception error 0C is generally equivalent to EMM386 exception error 12 or a stack fault.

APPLIES TO
•Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition
•Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition
•Microsoft Windows 98 Standard Edition
•Microsoft Windows 95 Service Pack 1

Keywords:
kbdiskmemory kberrmsg kbfatalexerr0d kbfatalexerr0e kbhardware kbprb KB138788


Edited by tg1911, 28 May 2005 - 07:58 PM.

MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P, CPU: Phenom II X4 955 Deneb BE, HS/F: CoolerMaster V8, RAM: 2 x 1G Kingston HyperX DDR2 800, VGA: ECS GeForce Black GTX 560, PSU: Antec TruePower Modular 750W, Soundcard: Asus Xonar D1, Case: CoolerMaster COSMOS 1000, Storage: Internal - 2 x Seagate 250GB SATA, 2 x WD 1TB SATA; External - Seagate 500GB USB, WD 640GB eSATA, 3 x WD 1TB eSATA

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#5 MrHyDe

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Posted 29 May 2005 - 12:50 AM

Thanks! So just to be clear, this error could have occured after a change from windows 98 to windows 98 2nd Edition?

#6 tg1911

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Posted 30 May 2005 - 04:44 PM

Looks like it could be a RAM or Motherboard problem.

RESOLUTION
To resolve these errors, it is often necessary to replace the RAM and/or system board (motherboard). In some circumstances it may be possible to alter CMOS settings, such as Memory Wait States, to run Windows successfully. In other cases, disabling the motherboard L2 cache allows Windows to run. For information about how to edit CMOS settings, please view your computer documentation or contact your hardware manufacturer.


MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P, CPU: Phenom II X4 955 Deneb BE, HS/F: CoolerMaster V8, RAM: 2 x 1G Kingston HyperX DDR2 800, VGA: ECS GeForce Black GTX 560, PSU: Antec TruePower Modular 750W, Soundcard: Asus Xonar D1, Case: CoolerMaster COSMOS 1000, Storage: Internal - 2 x Seagate 250GB SATA, 2 x WD 1TB SATA; External - Seagate 500GB USB, WD 640GB eSATA, 3 x WD 1TB eSATA

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