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Is C# good to start with?


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#1 Steve_Irwin

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 06:26 PM

Is C# good to start programming with? I'm still debating with C and C#, most people say C. Please say why and why not. Seems like most people learn C or C++ first instead of C#, why is that? :thumbsup:
Thanks!

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#2 groovicus

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 06:44 PM

It depends. What do you want to be able to do? If you are interested in doing embedded systems, then C would be perfect. If not, then C++ or C# would be fine. Personally, I prefer C# because it is a very regular (which will mean nothing to you at this point), and easy to read. C++, not so much. C can be difficult to read.

most people say C.

Most people where? I am in an academic setting where I work with many developers from around the nation, and virtually none would say C.

And if by "good" you mean easy, I am afraid that you are going to be disappointed. No language is "easy." Some languages have features which make them easier, but not easy.

#3 Steve_Irwin

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 07:23 PM

It depends. What do you want to be able to do? If you are interested in doing embedded systems, then C would be perfect. If not, then C++ or C# would be fine. Personally, I prefer C# because it is a very regular (which will mean nothing to you at this point), and easy to read. C++, not so much. C can be difficult to read.

most people say C.

Most people where? I am in an academic setting where I work with many developers from around the nation, and virtually none would say C.

And if by "good" you mean easy, I am afraid that you are going to be disappointed. No language is "easy." Some languages have features which make them easier, but not easy.


That's interesting. Thanks for the quick response. Well I think I'll start with C# since I already have a book for it. I don't know if I want to learn C, because it seems I don't see much C programming in forums compared to C++/C#. Why do people learn C++ instead of C# first even though C# is newer? xD
Thanks very much. :thumbsup:

#4 Uraiser

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 03:54 PM

Different functions. I'm new to C# myself.

Groovicus is right about no programming language being "easy". You have to be a logical thinker in order to get anything done, it's not just throwing a couple of words in and sitting back. You have to have structure, "If this wont work, then will this?". I've learned so much by starting with VB.NET, then moving to C#. They're both very different, but the logic is the same. So, I'd suggest start thinking logically about everything, that will help a lot.

By the way, any time Groov offers any kind of advice, take it. The man is great.

#5 groovicus

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 08:32 PM

:thumbsup:

I don't know about that, but thanks for the vote of confidence. I do try to share the best of my experience with everyone (whether they want to hear it or not).

#6 pheonix

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 07:06 PM

C# is a very broad language. Like groovicus said, it depends what you actually want to do. There is no point learning a powerful language if all you want to do is write a few console apps that take some user input and add it together (an extreme example im sure :thumbsup:)

Anyway, in order to learn C# I think you should first try to research "object oriented" and understand things like objects, properties and members. C# is based on C, so if you have never learnt about object oriented programming, I would suggest that you learn the basics of the C programming language first.

That way when you move onto learning C#, you can focus on how objects interelate rather then worrying about how to call functions and setup variables.

Dave

#7 cliffdodger

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 01:18 PM

Like the others have said, it really depends on what you're wanting to do. Unless you feel like learning 7-12 languages you may also want to give a bit of thought as to what types of applications you see yourself developing.

Embedded apps, controlling server's, cnc machines, etc... Assembly or C.
Most business software you're going to be using C# or VB.NET - advantage with C# is that xbox has released a free development kit for C# to publish games on the xbox. (not that that makes it easy)

C++ is great to know. Even if you don't end up using it in the work place PHP, Perl, Python, C#, Actionscript (Flash's OOP extension) and more were all modeled after C++ in some way.

PHP is actually a GREAT C++ based starting language. One of the things I found slowing me down when learning to code was the interface development (but then I wasn't using vb) You can keep your interfaces pretty simple in html while you're learning to write good php. Best part is you can do it anywhere and don't need a compiler. You just need access to a webserver or a hosting account and many free hosts allow use of php. You may find it's limited support with the free one's and might want to pay a few $ a month for a cheaper host. Fyi though the cheapo hosts tend to have lots of hidden fees and aren't as cheap as they advertise.

Also if you're more of a scientist and like to know how things work.. learn C/C++.
If you want to see results in your work and feel like you're getting somewhere and develop windows or internet applications... go with something else. I'd say start with PHP - can't go wrong there. Once you're comfortable with that tackle C# if that's what you're interested in most. And if you really want to know how stuff works without learning C you can still read about it and get the basic idea. IMO
Cliff,
Better results through elearning

#8 ryan_w_quick

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 09:17 AM

i've only used c and pascal. from what ive been told, and to some extent ive seen it, C is very free form and there are many things that you can do. for example in C, any statement other than zero is true. this adds a lot of flexibility in if and for and while statements. however, this also makes many compilers frustrating when you've made some small indistinguishable error. im happy with where i am as far as programming, and enjoy working on embedded systems and microcontrollers, but i do have to say i wish i had started somewhere else, or picked up more along the way, if not just for a different flavor
"To do less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." Steve Prefontaine

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"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same god who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." Galileo

#9 groovicus

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 09:37 AM

for example in C, any statement other than zero is true. this adds a lot of flexibility


That is the same for all programming languages, and doesn't say anything about C at all.




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