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HP a410n Power Supply LED Blinking


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#1 Mike Moore

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 04:37 PM

I recently moved to a new house and upon hooking up my computer I found that it wouldn't turn on. I noticed the power button on the front was blinking along with the green LED on the back. So I went to the HP website and followed the instructions for power supply troubleshooting (located here: http://tinyurl.com/dbtm94). I found that the LED only blinks when it is plugged into the motherboard. I don't know what to do from this point on. Any help would be greatly appreciated. The computer stats are as follows:

HP a410n
512 mb memory
120 gb hard drive
2.8 Ghz Intel Celeron Processor
The computer is completely stock, I haven't changed any components, except for the CD Drive which was replaced about 3 or 4 years ago.

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#2 Sterling14

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 05:00 PM

Welcome to bleepingcomputer Mike Moore (I have a friend named Mike Moore, what a coincidence :thumbsup: )

Did you follow all of the directions in that link you posted? Also, after moving the computer around, I would check to make sure all of the connections inside are secured. Make sure the 20(or 24) pin power motherboard connection is in, along with the 4-pin cpu power cable. I would also make sure the processor heatsink fan is on securely.

If after following all of the directions in that document, and what I recommended to you, I would say the power supply is dead and you'll need a replacement. Hp, Dell, Gateway, etc. are known to use cheap power supplies, that fail frequently.
"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." - Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM, 1943

#3 dc3

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 09:29 PM

You test the PSU using the method outlined below.

The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test the PSU.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

At this point you can use a DC Voltage meter to read the different rail Voltages. You will want to insert the black probe into any of the Black (-) sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the five different colored sockets, one at a time. Below are the five different colors and their corresponding rail voltages. The Voltages should be within about ten percent plus or minus of the given values.

Yellow +12VDC

Blue -12VDC

Red +5VDC

White -5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.

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#4 Mike Moore

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 10:29 AM

Thanks for the test procedure dc3. Here are the results of the test:

-When I jumped the connector and plugged in the PSU the fan and the LED on the PSU started right up.
-I checked the voltages that you stated above and all checked out good within .02 of the standards you gave.
-I plugged the connector back into the motherboard after I completed the test and the problem occurred again. The LED on the PSU started blinking and the computer wouldn't start up. It only does this when the 20 pin connector is connected, not the 4 pin.

Where do I go from here?

#5 dc3

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 12:32 PM

My first thought is that you have a short somewhere either on the motherboard or with one of the peripheral devices plugged into it. Look inside the case and see if there is anything out of place. Have you added any hardware inside the case recently?

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#6 Mike Moore

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 04:32 PM

No, I haven't done anything to the computer at all. The first time I ever opened up the case was when this problem occurred.

#7 the_patriot11

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 04:32 AM

its possible that during the moving some static electricity or similar build up shorted something, or that one of the wires inside came loose. double check the wires leading connecting the power button to the motherboard. I sincerely doubt thats the problem but it wont hurt to check.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#8 dc3

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 04:50 AM

I read in the HP forums that you should press and hold the power button for thirty seconds.

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#9 Mike Moore

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 08:54 PM

I checked all the wires and the internal components. Nothing seems loose or out of whack. What else could I check?




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