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Beginner needing memory upgrade help


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Leprechaun

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 12:54 PM

*Hopes this is the right sub-forum*

Greetings all. I have a very nice PC, and all is working well with it. However, I wish to upgrade my memory. But I've never done that before.

So, my questions are:-

* How do I find out what I need, or rather, what will work with my PC?
* Having done that, how much information do I need to give a store to make sure I get something useable?
* Can you recommend any cheap yet good suppliers (in the UK)?
* Does this seem like a good deal?
Fetch me another plaything, this one seems to have broken.

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#2 P3-450

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 01:21 PM

Hi

First off all I would not recommend purchasing from Ebuyer, although they are cheap they are not very reputable. When things go wrong they really go wrong.


I have always used Crucial Memory and have never had a problem.

On their website you can select the model of your motherboard/pc and it will give you the correct ram for it.

To find out what model your motherboard is download Everest and this will tell you all you need to know about your computer.
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#3 junkdk

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Posted 27 May 2005 - 08:44 PM

Dear Lepre,

P3 recommends Crucial Technology (Micron) memory. Its ok. One of my computers has Micron memory but their customer service and lifetime warranty are questionable.

Go with Corsair memory. I never had a problem with the memory. They also have a web-page that matches your mother board with the proper memory.

It's called the ram guy.

At the very least it deserves checking out.

Let us know,

junkdk :thumbsup:
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#4 tg1911

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Posted 27 May 2005 - 10:56 PM

Don't buy cheap RAM.
This is one area where the saying, "You get what you pay for.", definitely applies.

I would buy RAM from one of these three companys:
(just plug in your specs, they'll give you options)

Crucial

Kingston

Corsair

Also, check out the info on their sites. There's a lot of good info about RAM, definitely worth the read.

Some additional info on RAM:

There are such things as cheap , ninety day , or generic RAM, which is actually sold,
and doesn't meet the minimum standards of the JEDEC (Joint Electron Device Engineering Council), for use in computers. But it is still sold, and un-informed people, still buy it.

RAM can generally be divided into a few classes:
(Excepting Performance or Overclockers RAM, which is made to the highest tolerances)

Premium or Lifetime Warranty: This RAM is made from Identical chips, all tested
and meeting the assemblers standards, all from the same chip manufacturer and lot.
The capacitors and resistors are of the highest standard, and exceed the JEDEC
standard, and all are installed on a circuit board which is thicker than required . The
final product is tested to confirm that it is stable at the rated speed.

One Year Warranty: Very close, but may include memory chips from different batches,
although still the same manufacturer. The circuit board tends to be at least one ply
thinner, and the resistors and capacitors may have more variance. These still meet the
JEDEC standards, and are tested to make sure they are stable at the specified speed.

OEM: These are intended for sale to a manufacturer, not for resale, although they
often are sold retail. Often if you buy two sticks, you will find that they have memory
chips from different manufacturers. They still meet standards (the chips are certified to
meet the manufacturers specifications), but are often yet another ply thinner, and once
again, may have more variance in the tolerance of resistors and capacitors, and may
use fewer, than on higher quality RAM.

Generic or 90 Day RAM: This is the lowest quality you will generally encounter.
Often these are made of leftover chips; ones salvaged from returned and failed RAM,
RAM designed to run at a higher speed which failed and became unstable. They are
put on really thin boards, which do not meet the JEDEC standard. They rarely have
even the minimum number, and quality of resistors and capacitors, recomended by the
JEDEC .

Also, if you touch the RAM anywhere except the edges, you should know that the oils
and salts in your skin are corrosive, and will eventually damage the ram. And if you
touch it without observing anti-static precautions, you can cause damage, which may
show up immediately, or somewhere down the line.

This is why I always recommend that you spend the extra money to buy Quality Name
Brand RAM
with a lifetime warranty. I also prefer to buy all RAM at one time when
possible, and at a minimum, make sure it has identical specifications (easiest method,
make sure it is same manufacturer and model).
MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P, CPU: Phenom II X4 955 Deneb BE, HS/F: CoolerMaster V8, RAM: 2 x 1G Kingston HyperX DDR2 800, VGA: ECS GeForce Black GTX 560, PSU: Antec TruePower Modular 750W, Soundcard: Asus Xonar D1, Case: CoolerMaster COSMOS 1000, Storage: Internal - 2 x Seagate 250GB SATA, 2 x WD 1TB SATA; External - Seagate 500GB USB, WD 640GB eSATA, 3 x WD 1TB eSATA

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#5 Leprechaun

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 12:36 PM

Thank you all, the help is appreciated :thumbsup:
Fetch me another plaything, this one seems to have broken.

#6 tg1911

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 02:11 PM

You're quite welcome, Leprechaun.
Glad to be of help.
MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P, CPU: Phenom II X4 955 Deneb BE, HS/F: CoolerMaster V8, RAM: 2 x 1G Kingston HyperX DDR2 800, VGA: ECS GeForce Black GTX 560, PSU: Antec TruePower Modular 750W, Soundcard: Asus Xonar D1, Case: CoolerMaster COSMOS 1000, Storage: Internal - 2 x Seagate 250GB SATA, 2 x WD 1TB SATA; External - Seagate 500GB USB, WD 640GB eSATA, 3 x WD 1TB eSATA

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#7 Herk

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Posted 28 May 2005 - 07:31 PM

Just for the record, be very careful when handling memory and touching things inside your computer. ESD or Electrical Static Discharge, can destroy the memory or any other electronic part instantly. It only takes 30 volts to destroy a chip, and your body can easily store 30,000 volts.

Leave the memory in the package until you're ready to use it. Don't open it and carry it around. Once you're ready to install, either wear a grounding strap attached to bare metal on your computer or some other good ground like a metal desk. At least touch bare metal with your fingers before handling anything.

Older AT computers don't have power to the motherboard when they're turned off, but newer ATX computers do! The conventional wisdom used to be to turn off the computer and leave the power cord plugged in so that it would have a good earth ground. However, if you do that with an ATX or other new motherboard style, you'll have a hot motherboard and you can short things and fry them.

So, turn your computer off; take off the side panel; sit down and touch the metal frame; pull the power cord, open the memory and install it. (Or uninstall the old and install the new - whichever order.) Once you've done, you can leave the side off long enough to see if it works when you plug it back in and turn it on. If you have to handle it again, repeat the previous procedure. And handle the memory by the edges as much as possible.

Make sure you get the notch in the memory at the correct end of the slot. Make sure the latches are fully secured, indicating that the memory is completely seated.




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